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Altruism Trumping Privacy Hipaa, Privacy, Big Data Set Benefits, Douglas J. Henderson Oct 2012

Altruism Trumping Privacy Hipaa, Privacy, Big Data Set Benefits, Douglas J. Henderson

DOUGLAS J HENDERSON

The United States Government must administer a publicly held cloud networked Big Data Set of Private Health Information (PHI) in order to utilize Big Data Analytics and allow free data mining of such PHI so that the health care industry can operate most cost effectively while also meeting the health care needs of the aging United States populace with the highest quality of care.


Judicial Review And The Exclusionary Rule, Morgan Cloud Oct 2012

Judicial Review And The Exclusionary Rule, Morgan Cloud

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Christian Executioner: Reconciling “An Eye For An Eye” With “Turn The Other Cheek”, Jill Jones Oct 2012

The Christian Executioner: Reconciling “An Eye For An Eye” With “Turn The Other Cheek”, Jill Jones

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Pardon Me - The Need For A Fair And Impartial Judiciary, Jim Rosenblatt Jul 2012

Pardon Me - The Need For A Fair And Impartial Judiciary, Jim Rosenblatt

Journal Articles

The pardons issued by former Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour shortly before he left office created a swirl of controversy in Mississippi that played out in the national media. The Governor's Mansion, the Hinds County Courthouse, the State Capitol, and the Gartin Justice Building were frequent backdrops for media stories that took place over a two-month period reporting on "Pardongate." Several elements combined to make these pardons controversial and to make the issue such good fodder for the media.


Something Smells Rotten: The Practical Consequences Of Bad Epistemology In The Context Of Drug Sniffing Dogs., George Souri Jan 2012

Something Smells Rotten: The Practical Consequences Of Bad Epistemology In The Context Of Drug Sniffing Dogs., George Souri

George Souri

This paper examines the practical consequences of most courts' rational, rather than empirical, epistemology in the context of drug-sniffing dogs. Using the case of Florida v. Harris, this paper criticizes the unscientific attitude of many courts, and argues that, by employing a purely rational epistemology to justify the use of drug-sniffing dogs to establish probable cause, the Court impedes the Constitution's skepticism of, and protection from, arbitrary government intrusions. The paper concludes by proposing a new empirical standard based on the Daubert factors.


Media Influence In The Ghailani Trial: Have We Seen This Before? The Ever-Growing Importance Of An Independent Judiciary, Michael Perich Jan 2012

Media Influence In The Ghailani Trial: Have We Seen This Before? The Ever-Growing Importance Of An Independent Judiciary, Michael Perich

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Note will demonstrate that the extensive media coverage in the Ghailaini trial affected the final decision reached in the case. Using the attitudinal model of judicial decision making as a lens, I will demonstrate that the judge‘s decision was ultimately influenced by a variety of external factors. Specifically, this is because the media, rather than the courts, seemed to decide the ultimate outcome. The possibility that outside factors swayed the decisions of Judge Kaplan calls into question the independence of the judiciary, which ultimately affects the sense of justice created by Ghailani‘s prosecution. To look at the ...


Reimagining Criminal Prosecution: Toward A Color-Conscious Professional Ethic For Prosecutors, Justin Murray Jan 2012

Reimagining Criminal Prosecution: Toward A Color-Conscious Professional Ethic For Prosecutors, Justin Murray

Articles & Chapters

Prosecutors, like mostAmericans, view the criminal-justice system asfundamentally race neutral. They are aware that blacks are stopped, searched, arrested, and locked up in numbers that are vastly out of proportion to their fraction of the overall population. Yet, they generally assume that this outcome is justified because it reflects the sad reality that blacks commit a disproportionate share of crime in America. They are unable to detect the ways in which their own discretionary choices-and those of other actors in the criminal-justice system, such as legislators, police officers, and jurors-contribute to the staggering and disproportionate incarceration of black Americans. In ...


New Law, Old Cases, Fair Outcomes: Why The Illinois Supreme Court Must Overrule People V Flowers, 43 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 727 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill Jan 2012

New Law, Old Cases, Fair Outcomes: Why The Illinois Supreme Court Must Overrule People V Flowers, 43 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 727 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Understanding The United States' Incarceration Rate, William T. Pizzi Jan 2012

Understanding The United States' Incarceration Rate, William T. Pizzi

Articles

What has caused prison sentences to climb so sharply and consistently in the last four decades?


Bringing Nuremberg Home: Justice Jackson's Path Back To Buffalo, October 4, 1946, John Q. Barrett Jan 2012

Bringing Nuremberg Home: Justice Jackson's Path Back To Buffalo, October 4, 1946, John Q. Barrett

Faculty Publications

During one permanently consequential decade in the history of the United States and the world, United States Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson delivered three major lectures at the University of Buffalo. The last of these was Jackson's May 9, 1951, James McCormick Mitchell Lecture, "Wartime Security and Liberty under Law," which inaugurated this distinguished lecture series. Justice Jackson's first formal lecture at the University of Buffalo occurred on February 23, 1942, halfway through his first year as a Supreme Court Justice and just twelve weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into World ...


Veterans Court: Towards The Implementation Of A Collaborative Justice Model In San Luis Obispo County, Daniel Smee Jan 2012

Veterans Court: Towards The Implementation Of A Collaborative Justice Model In San Luis Obispo County, Daniel Smee

Continuing Education (CAPSTONE)

Veterans’ treatment courts represent an emerging trend across the country of collaborative justice designed to deal with criminal justice issues stemming from problems linked to military service. This approach places the veteran in VA (Veterans Affairs) treatment programs as a diversion from incarceration. There are few such courts in California (nine) largely in non-rural counties. This study investigated two rural counties, Tulare and Santa Barbara with Veterans courts to develop a model for such a court in San Luis Obispo County. Early recidivism data at the one-year point for Tulare County showed a zero percent rate of criminal behavior (12 ...


Decarceration Courts: Possibilities And Perils Of A Shifting Criminal Law, Allegra M. Mcleod Jan 2012

Decarceration Courts: Possibilities And Perils Of A Shifting Criminal Law, Allegra M. Mcleod

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

A widely decried crisis confronts U.S. criminal law. Jails and prisons are overcrowded and violence plagued. Additional causes for alarm include the rate of increase of incarcerated populations, their historically and internationally unprecedented size, their racial disproportionality, and exorbitant associated costs. Although disagreement remains over the precise degree by which incarceration ought to be reduced, there is a growing consensus that some measure of decarceration is desirable.

With hopes of reducing reliance on conventional criminal supervision and incarceration, specialized criminal courts proliferated dramatically over the past two decades. There are approximately 3,000 specialized criminal courts in the United ...