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The Death Of Judicial Independence In Turkey: A Lesson For Others, Edwin L. Felter Jr., Oyku Didem Aydin Sep 2018

The Death Of Judicial Independence In Turkey: A Lesson For Others, Edwin L. Felter Jr., Oyku Didem Aydin

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Mining For Gold: The Constitutional Court Of South Africa's Experience With Comparative Constitutional Law, Ursula Bentele Oct 2014

Mining For Gold: The Constitutional Court Of South Africa's Experience With Comparative Constitutional Law, Ursula Bentele

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Japanese Constitution As Law And The Legitimacy Of The Supreme Court’S Constitutional Decisions: A Response To Matsui, Craig Martin Jan 2011

The Japanese Constitution As Law And The Legitimacy Of The Supreme Court’S Constitutional Decisions: A Response To Matsui, Craig Martin

Craig Martin

This article, from a conference at Washington University School of Law on the Supreme Court of Japan, responds to an article by Shigenori Matsui, “Why is the Japanese Supreme Court is so conservative?” Professor Matsui’s article makes the argument that a significant factor is the extent to which the judges fail to view the Constitution as positive law requiring judicial enforcement. It is novel in its emphasis on an explanation grounded in law, and the decision-making process, rather than the political, institutional, and cultural explanations that are so often offered. In this article, Borrowing from Kermit Roosevelt’s arguments ...


The Supreme Court Of Japan: Commentary On The Recent Work Of Scholars In The United States, Tokiyasu Fujita Jan 2011

The Supreme Court Of Japan: Commentary On The Recent Work Of Scholars In The United States, Tokiyasu Fujita

Washington University Law Review

In this Article, the author discusses the issues involving the Supreme Court of Japan (SCJ). It outlines the scholarly works of American law professors John O. Haley and David S. Law which focuses on the Japanese fiduciary. It stresses the gap between the perceived image and the reality of the Japanese fiduciary.


Why Is The Japanese Supreme Court So Conservative?, Shigenori Matsui Jan 2011

Why Is The Japanese Supreme Court So Conservative?, Shigenori Matsui

Washington University Law Review

The Article explores the development of a conservative constitutional jurisprudence by the Japanese Supreme Court. It describes the process and the power of judicial review in the country. It stresses the reluctance of Japanese judges to consider the Constitution of Japan as a source of positive law to be enforced by the judiciary.


From Inquisitorial To Accusatory: Colombia And Guatemala's Legal Transition, Andrés Torres Jan 2007

From Inquisitorial To Accusatory: Colombia And Guatemala's Legal Transition, Andrés Torres

Law and Justice in the Americas Working Paper Series

No abstract provided.


Reforming The Brazilian Supreme Federal Court: A Comparative Approach, Maria Angela Jardim De Santa Cruz Oliveira Jan 2006

Reforming The Brazilian Supreme Federal Court: A Comparative Approach, Maria Angela Jardim De Santa Cruz Oliveira

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

This Article defends giving the SFC power to issue provisional measures to stay the proceedings of identical cases in lower courts when the constitutional controversy has already been presented before the SFC.


Sovereignty And The American Courts At The Cocktail Party Of International Law: The Dangers Of Domestic Invocations Of Foreign And International Law, Donald J. Kochan Dec 2005

Sovereignty And The American Courts At The Cocktail Party Of International Law: The Dangers Of Domestic Invocations Of Foreign And International Law, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

With increasing frequency and heightened debate, United States courts have been citing foreign and “international” law as authority for domestic decisions. This trend is inappropriate, undemocratic, and dangerous. The trend touches on fundamental concepts of sovereignty, democracy, the judicial role, and overall issues of effective governance. There are multiple problems with the judiciary’s reliance on extraterritorial and extra-constitutional foreign or international sources to guide their decisions. Perhaps the most fundamental flaw is its interference with rule of law values. To borrow from Judge Harold Levanthal, the use of international sources in judicial decision-making might be described as “the equivalent ...


Judicial Activism In A Violent Context: The Origin, Role, And Impact Of The Colombian Constitutional Court, Manuel José Cepeda-Espinosa Jan 2004

Judicial Activism In A Violent Context: The Origin, Role, And Impact Of The Colombian Constitutional Court, Manuel José Cepeda-Espinosa

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

My intention in this overview is to describe generally the origins and impact of the Constitutional Court and its main decisions. I will also provide a general overview of its role within the Colombian system-a comprehensive assessment that has not been fully carried out to date and that obviously requires much more space and time than is available for this specific presentation.


Comparing Judicial Selection Systems, Lee Epstein, Jack Knight, Olga Shvetsova Jan 2001

Comparing Judicial Selection Systems, Lee Epstein, Jack Knight, Olga Shvetsova

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


An American Perspective On Environmental Impact Assessment In Australia, Mark Squillace Jan 1995

An American Perspective On Environmental Impact Assessment In Australia, Mark Squillace

Articles

No abstract provided.