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Boston College Law School

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The Face-Off Between Data Privacy And Discovery: Why U.S. Courts Should Respect Eu Data Privacy Law When Considering The Production Of Protected Information, Samantha Cutler Apr 2018

The Face-Off Between Data Privacy And Discovery: Why U.S. Courts Should Respect Eu Data Privacy Law When Considering The Production Of Protected Information, Samantha Cutler

Boston College Law Review

When foreign parties involved in U.S. litigation are ordered to produce information that is protected by EU data privacy law, they are caught in an unfortunate “Catch-22.” Historically, U.S. courts have pointed to the unlikelihood of sanctions for data privacy law violations to justify these orders. EU data privacy law, however, has recently undergone several shifts in favor of tougher rules and significantly increased sanctions. Additionally, EU regulators are now more vigilant and active in enforcing these laws. These developments, combined with the benefits of international judicial respect and the intrinsic value of privacy, mean that U.S ...


Technological Opacity & Procedural Injustice, Seth Katsuya Endo Mar 2018

Technological Opacity & Procedural Injustice, Seth Katsuya Endo

Boston College Law Review

From Google’s auto-correction of spelling errors to Netflix’s movie suggestions, machine-learning systems are a part of our everyday life. Both private and state actors increasingly employ such systems to make decisions that implicate individuals’ substantive rights, such as with credit scoring, government-benefit eligibility decisions, national security screening, and criminal sentencing. In turn, the rising use of machine-learning systems has led to questioning about whether they are sufficiently accurate, fair, and transparent. This Article builds on that work, focusing on how opaque technologies can subtly erode the due process norm of participation. To illuminate this issue, this Article examines ...


The Search For A Limited Search: The First Circuit Denies The Search Of Cell Phones Incident To Arrest In United States V. Wurie, Evan O'Connor Feb 2014

The Search For A Limited Search: The First Circuit Denies The Search Of Cell Phones Incident To Arrest In United States V. Wurie, Evan O'Connor

Boston College Law Review

On May 17, 2013, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in United States v. Wurie held that the warrantless search of a cell phone was not justified by the search-incident-to-arrest exception to the Fourth Amendment and was thus an illegal search. In doing so, the court declined to agree with other federal appeals court solutions regarding this issue; most notably, the Fifth Circuit’s 2007 decision in United States v. Finley and the Seventh Circuit’s 2012 decision in United States v. Flores-Lopez. This Comment argues that the approaches taken by courts on both sides of ...


Whether You "Like" It Or Not: The Inclusion Of Social Media Evidence In Sexual Harassment Cases And How Courts Can Effectively Control It, Laura E. Diss Sep 2013

Whether You "Like" It Or Not: The Inclusion Of Social Media Evidence In Sexual Harassment Cases And How Courts Can Effectively Control It, Laura E. Diss

Boston College Law Review

The increasing use of social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Myspace in social interactions has led to a corresponding increase in the use of social media evidence in litigation. Social media sites provide attorneys with easily accessible, up-to-date information about individuals, making such sites highly desirable sources of evidence. Although recent case law indicates that social media evidence is largely discoverable and often admissible, allowing broad discovery of social media evidence in sexual harassment cases could be highly problematic for plaintiffs because it often produces irrelevant and prejudicial evidence that only serves to embarrass plaintiffs and dissuade them from ...