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Articles 151 - 166 of 166

Full-Text Articles in Evidence

Nociones Generales De Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva Jan 1966

Nociones Generales De Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva

Edward Ivan Cueva

No abstract provided.


Fundamentos Del Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva Dec 1957

Fundamentos Del Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva

Edward Ivan Cueva

No abstract provided.


Pennsylvania's Clarifying Amendment For Declaratory Judgments, Edwin Borchard Jan 1944

Pennsylvania's Clarifying Amendment For Declaratory Judgments, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

On May 26 1943, the Pennsylvania legislature adopted the following amendment to Section 6 of the Uniform Declaratory Judgments Act, originally enacted in 1923:1 Sec. 6: Relief by declaratory judgment or decree may be granted in all civil cases where an actual controversy exists between contending parties, or where the court is satisfied that antagonistic claims are present between the parties involved which indicate imminent and inevitable litigation, or where in any such case the court is satisfied' that a party asserts a legal relation, status, right, or privilege in which he has a concrete interest and that there ...


Shall The Executive Agreement Replace The Treaty, Edwin Borchard Jan 1944

Shall The Executive Agreement Replace The Treaty, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In recent years many political leaders and publicists have sought to prove that the treaty-making process, requiring the "undemocratic." valid and desirable preferably without congressional approval or, by a majority of Congress. 1300 executive agreements have been concluded history, as contrasted 900 i8 that up to 1928 only 15 for good reasons; treaties have been amended by have benefited the nation.

BASES OF THE PROPOSALS FOR CHANGE

The recent proposals for a change in the Constitution, either with or without benefit of a constitutional amendment, have their origin in several grievances and are said to derive moral support from several ...


State Indemnity For Errors Of Criminal Justice, Edwin Borchard Jan 1941

State Indemnity For Errors Of Criminal Justice, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

All too frequently the public is shocked by the news that Federal or State authorities have convicted and imprisoned a person subsequently proved to have been innocent of any crime. These accidents in the administration of the criminal law happen either through an unfortunate concurrence of circumstances or perjured testimony or are the result of mistaken identity, the conviction having been obtained by zealous prosecuting attorneys on circumstantial evidence. In an earnest effort to compensate in some measure the victims of these miscarriages of justice, Congress in May 1938 enacted a law "to grant relief to persons erroneously convicted in ...


Recent Developments In Declaratory Relief, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

Recent Developments In Declaratory Relief, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The way of the reformer, like that of the transgressor, is hard. It will be recalled that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, after an excellent start in 1925 in the application of the procedure for a declaratory judgment in Karihey's Petition had fallen into regrettable error in a number of later cases by assuming that a declaratory judgment could· not be sought or granted when any other "established" remedy was available. This was in direct conflict with the express words of the Declaratory Judgments Act to the effect that declaratory judgments may be rendered "whether or not further relief is ...


An Indiana Declaratory Judgment, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

An Indiana Declaratory Judgment, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

It is an aphorism that the greatest enemies of law reform, and particularly of procedural reform, are the lawyers. A striking exemplification of the axiom may be found in Brindley v. Meara, decided by the Supreme Court of Indiana, November 18, 1935, 198 N. E. 301. That was the second of two appearances before the Supreme Court of the members of the advisory board of North Township, Lake County. They had already successfully brought an action for a declaratory judgment, construing a statute which determined that they and not the defendant, township trustee, had the power to select the persons ...


Justiciability, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

Justiciability, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

It might be supposed that justiciability, the very foundation of the judicial function, would be a matter on which courts could hardly differ. Yet there seems to be the greatest confusion among the courts as to when an issue is and is not susceptible of judicial decision. This is largely due to a devotion to phrases and symbols which make historical investigation and theoretical analysis seem an unnecessary encroachment on the judicial prerogative. The very system of stare decisis invites courts to relieve themselves of the necessity of thinking through again ostensible propositions which seem to have once received the ...


Federal Declaratory Judgments Act, Edwin Borchard Jan 1934

Federal Declaratory Judgments Act, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

It is especially appropriate to publish in the Virginia Law Review the first extensive commentary on the Federal Declaratory Judgments Act. The credit for its enactment falls largely to ex-Governor, now Representative, Andrew J. Montague, of Virginia, who piloted the Act through the House of Representatives on four separate occasions. His persistence over a period of many years was finally rewarded when on June 14, 1934, President Roosevelt signed the Act (Pub. 343) giving the Federal Courts power to render such judgments.


Declaratory Judgments In Administrative Law, Edwin Borchard Jan 1933

Declaratory Judgments In Administrative Law, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The declaratory judgment, now adopted in thirty-three American states and territories, has demonstrated its value in the speedy and effective determination of numerous controversies involving status, contracts and other written instruments, and property relations. Its utility in the adjudication of conflicting claims between the citizen and the administration, however, a field of litigation to which it is admirably suited, has not been fully appreciated. It is not merely its speed, inexpensiveness, and efficiency which commend the judicial declaration of rights in administrative law, nor yet the fact that it enables disputes to be determined in their incipiency before they have ...


Judicial Relief For Insecurity, Edwin Borchard Jan 1933

Judicial Relief For Insecurity, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In an earlier article' an attempt was made to criticize the narrowness of view which has limited the concept of "wrongs" and "cause of action” to committed delicts, and the concept of the judicial process, to their redress. This superficial view of legal relations and of the judicial function has obscured realization of the fact that harm is done and rights are impaired or jeopardized by mere dispute or challenge before and without any physical attack. The mere existence of an instrument, the denial of a right, the assertion of an unfounded claim, the existence of conflicting claims to the ...


Declaratory Judgments In New Jersey, Edwin Borchard Jan 1932

Declaratory Judgments In New Jersey, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

New Jersey was the State which, by the statute of 1915 and the case of In re Ungaro’s Will, began the current movement for the introduction of the declaratory judgment into American procedure. Appreciation of its beneficent effect is attested by the fact that thirty-one American jurisdictions have now adopted it as an aid in the solution of contested issues of law, before one party or the other has incurred the risk of loss or damage by acting upon his own interpretation of his rights under a contract, will, statute, or other legal instrument or relation. Its history in ...


Judicial Relief For Peril And Insecurity, Edwin Borchard Jan 1932

Judicial Relief For Peril And Insecurity, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In the United States, we are not accustomed to consider the theory of procedure as of profound importance. Possibly the extraordinary technicality of American procedure by reason of which substantive issues are so often relegated to practical oblivion by procedural tactics is in part responsible. At all events, the unsystematic and empirical method of embarking upon and concluding litigation seems to have developed a frame of mind somewhat indifferent to the theoretical function of the judicial process. For example, down to very recent days Justices of the United States Supreme Court gave expression to the view, now happily repudiated, that ...


Declaratory Judgment In The United States, Edwin Borchard Jan 1931

Declaratory Judgment In The United States, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The common law and other legal systems long professed the assumption that it was necessary to commit physical damage or injury (a wrong) or to threaten an immediate injury, before the protection of the courts could be invoked by the person requiring

judicial protection. It was apparently not sufficiently realized that rights may be impaired and disturbed and injuries suffered by the mere assertion of claims which throw rights into doubt, uncertainty, and jeopardy. So the mere unfounded assertion that a person is married or unmarried, illegitimate, insane; the mere fact that title to property is challenged; the mere fact ...


Government Liability In Tort, Edwin Borchard Jan 1925

Government Liability In Tort, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Probably no function of a municipal corporation is more “governmental" in character than the care of its highways, streets and bridges. In theory, therefore, the city should be immune from responsibility for negligence in such matters; and such was the common law. Precisely the opposite result, however, constitutes the weight of judicial authority in this country, even in the absence of statue, on the commonly advanced ground that the duty of taking care of the public highways is ministerial in character. The conclusion deserves approval, though not necessarily the ground on which it is based. More difficult to support is ...


Jurisprudence In Germany, Edwin Borchard Jan 1912

Jurisprudence In Germany, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Library of Congress is now undertaking the publication of a series of guides to foreign law. One of the objects of the enterprise is to acquaint the practitioner and the legislator with the legal institutions of foreign countries. Another of its objects is to show the evolution and present development of juristic thought abroad, and the extent to which a virile philosophy of law and a sound conception of the relation between law and social science have succeeded in creating a jurisprudence which has proved far more efficient than the common law in responding to the needs of present ...