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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Essay – The Author's Name As A Trademark: A Perverse Perspective On The Moral Right Of «Paternity»?, Jane C. Ginsburg Jan 2005

Essay – The Author's Name As A Trademark: A Perverse Perspective On The Moral Right Of «Paternity»?, Jane C. Ginsburg

Faculty Scholarship

The US Supreme Court in its 2003 decision in Dastar v. Twentieth Century Fox, construing the Lanham Federal Trademarks Act, deprived authors of their principal legal means to enforce attribution rights in the US. I have elsewhere criticized the Dastar Court's analysis, and have urged amending the Copyright Act to provide express recognition of the attribution right. This time, however, I propose to reconsider the foundation for the attribution right; I draw on literary and historical sources to supplement legal arguments concerning the meaning of the author's name. I will suggest that, contrary to the usual characterization of ...


Hands Off Policy: Equal Protection And The Contact Sports Exemption Of Title Ix, Jamal Greene Jan 2005

Hands Off Policy: Equal Protection And The Contact Sports Exemption Of Title Ix, Jamal Greene

Faculty Scholarship

Before becoming a poster child for gender equity in athletics, Heather Sue Mercer was an all-state place kicker at Yorktown Heights High School in Yorktown Heights, New York (pop. 7,972). She enrolled at Duke University in the fall of 1994 and decided to become the first woman ever to try out for the Duke football team. Initially she failed to make the team as a walk-on, but the following spring she was invited by the seniors on the team to play in the annual Blue-White scrimmage. She ended up kicking a game-winning twenty-eight-yard field goal. Afterwards, Duke head coach ...


Featuring The Three Tenors In La Triviata, Victor P. Goldberg Jan 2005

Featuring The Three Tenors In La Triviata, Victor P. Goldberg

Faculty Scholarship

In the "Three Tenors" case the FTC found an agreement a violation of the antitrust law despite the fact that there was no way it could be anticompetitive. The Commission failed to heed the lessons of Coase's classic paper on the nature of the firm, making a sharp distinction between activities within a firm (legal) and across firm boundaries (not legal). Analytically, there should be no distinction. The decision to integrate activities by contract rather than ownership is a matter of relative transactions costs. Since the boundaries of the firm are, ultimately, an economic decision reflecting the costs and ...