Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Law As Design: Objects, Concepts And Digital Things, Michael J. Madison Apr 2005

Law As Design: Objects, Concepts And Digital Things, Michael J. Madison

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

This Article initiates an account of “things” in the law, including both conceptual things and material things. Human relationships matter to the design of law. Yet things matter too. To an increasing extent, and particularly via the advent of digital technology, those relationships are not only considered ex post by the law but are designed into things, ex ante, by their producers. This development has a number of important dimensions. Some are familiar, such as the reification of conceptual things as material things, so that computer software is treated as a good. Others are new, such as the characterization of ...


Antitrust And Inefficient Joint Ventures: Why Sports Leagues Should Look More Like Mcdonald’S And Less Like The United Nations, Stephen F. Ross Mar 2005

Antitrust And Inefficient Joint Ventures: Why Sports Leagues Should Look More Like Mcdonald’S And Less Like The United Nations, Stephen F. Ross

ExpressO

Antitrust law generally favors joint ventures that allow separate firms to integrate economic functions while continuing to compete as independent entities. In evaluating the risks to competition that joint ventures could pose, insufficient attention has been paid to the risk that joint ventures with market power may be structured so that the parties, acting in their independent self-interest, will prevent the venture from providing innovative goods and services responsive to consumer demand. In these cases, it may be better if a single firm provided services rather than having them provided jointly.

We illustrate this problem by challenging the conventional wisdom ...