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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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2003

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll Sep 2003

Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll

Working Paper Series

Many participants in the music industry consider unauthorized downloading of music files over the Internet to be “theft” of their “property.” Many Internet users who exchange music files reject that characterization. Prompted by this dispute, this Article explores how those who create and distribute music first came to look upon music as their property and when in Western history the law first supported this view. By analyzing the economic and legal structures governing musicmaking in Western Europe from the classical period in Greece through the Renaissance, the Article shows that the law first granted some exclusive rights in the Middle ...


I Say It's Spinach: Charitable Trusts To Remedy Market Failures In The Performing Arts, Jeffrey G. Sherman Mar 2003

I Say It's Spinach: Charitable Trusts To Remedy Market Failures In The Performing Arts, Jeffrey G. Sherman

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


On The Wagon Train To Afghanistan: Limitations On Star Trek's Prime Directive, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Jan 2003

On The Wagon Train To Afghanistan: Limitations On Star Trek's Prime Directive, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Faculty Publications

Part II of this article acquaints the reader with the Star Trek universe, both as a mirror of Western cultural development for the last three and a half decades, and conversely as a force that has had a remarkable impact on contemporary Western culture. This acquaintance provides a foundation to understand how and to what extent the Prime Directive, a product of science fiction, can be useful in understanding future intercultural contacts right here on Earth. Part III of this article reviews specifically the appearance of the Prime Directive in Star Trek lore, for the most part with reference to ...


Big Picture, Fine Print: The Intersection Of Art And Tax, Anne-Marie E. Rhodes Jan 2003

Big Picture, Fine Print: The Intersection Of Art And Tax, Anne-Marie E. Rhodes

Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


Coaches' Liability For Athletes' Injuries And Deaths, Thomas R. Hurst, James N. Knight Jan 2003

Coaches' Liability For Athletes' Injuries And Deaths, Thomas R. Hurst, James N. Knight

UF Law Faculty Publications

In the brutally hot summer of 2001, three prominent athletes lost their lives on playing fields across the country. Football players Korey Stringer of the Minnesota Vikings,' Rashidi Wheeler of Northwestern University, and Eraste Autin of the University Florida collapsed and died in summer practices. These practices are an annual rite that has preceded each football season since the sport was conceived approximately ninety years ago. While these deaths are tragic, they are certainly not uncommon. Since 1995, eighteen high school and collegiate football players have died while participating in practices or games. In America's litigious society, these deaths ...


A Primer On U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Applicable To Music Information Retrieval Systems, Michael W. Carroll Jan 2003

A Primer On U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Applicable To Music Information Retrieval Systems, Michael W. Carroll

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Digital technology has had a significant impact on the ways in which music information can be stored, transmitted, and used. Within the information sciences, music information retrieval has become an increasingly important and complex field. This brief article is addressed primarily to those involved in the design and implementation of systems for storing and retrieving digital files containing musical notation, recorded music, and relevant metadata – hereinafter referred to as a Music Information Retrieval System (“MIRS”). In particular, this group includes information specialists, software engineers, and the attorneys who advise them. Although peer-to-peer computer applications, such as Napster’s MusicShare or ...


The Copyright Divide, Peter K. Yu Jan 2003

The Copyright Divide, Peter K. Yu

Faculty Scholarship

Most recently, the recording industry filed 261 lawsuits against individuals who illegally downloaded and distributed a large amount of music via peer-to-peer file-sharing networks, such as KaZaA, Grokster, iMesh, and Gnutella. Although the industry's recent approach was controversial and resulted in major criticisms from legislators, academics, civil libertarians, consumer advocates, and university officials, the copyright holders' aggressive tactics are not new.

In fact, copyright holders have been known for using, or encouraging their government to use, coercive power to protect their creative works. Only a decade ago, the U.S. copyright industries have lobbied their government to use strong-armed ...


Shielding The Unmedia: Using The Process Of Journalism To Protect The Journalist's Privilege In An Infinite Universe Of Publication, Linda L. Berger Jan 2003

Shielding The Unmedia: Using The Process Of Journalism To Protect The Journalist's Privilege In An Infinite Universe Of Publication, Linda L. Berger

Scholarly Works

When a computer and a connection to the Internet allow almost anyone to claim to be a journalist, the question of who should be covered by media shield laws becomes especially difficult. Based on the premise that it is important to preserve the journalist's privilege and to accommodate the "unmedia" if that can be done without undermining journalism's values, this article suggests that the best way to limit the journalist's privilege is not to define "who is a journalist?" or "what is news?" Instead, the privilege should extend protection to anyone who is engaged in the work ...


Balancing As Art: Justice White And The Separation Of Powers, William J. Wagner Jan 2003

Balancing As Art: Justice White And The Separation Of Powers, William J. Wagner

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

In more than one key opinion, Justice Byron White cited Justice Robert H. Jackson's concept of the "art of governing" as the cornerstone of his own approach to separation-of-powers problems.' In Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer, Justice Jackson had written:

The actual art of governing under our Constitution does not and cannot conform to judicial definitions of the power of any of its branches based on isolated clauses or even single Articles torn from context. While the Constitution diffuses power the better to secure liberty, it also contemplates that practice will integrate the dispersed powers into a workable ...


A Few Thoughts About Using Visual Images In Latcrit, Jo Carrillo Jan 2003

A Few Thoughts About Using Visual Images In Latcrit, Jo Carrillo

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


One Inspiring Jury, Phoebe C. Ellsworth Jan 2003

One Inspiring Jury, Phoebe C. Ellsworth

Reviews

Americans love to complain about the jury. They complain about being called for jury duty. They complain about jury verdicts in highly publicized cases. They are outraged by the failure to convict "obviously guilty" criminals, such as the police officers in the cases of Rodney King and Amadou Diallo, the Menendez brothers in their first trial, and of course O.J. Simpson. In civil cases, they are appalled when plaintiffs win huge damage awards in "obviously frivolous" lawsuits. Juries are ignorant and uneducated, juries are gullible, juries are swayed by passion and prejudice rather than reason. Criticizing jury verdicts allows ...


Homicide On Holiday: Prosecutorial Discretion, Popular Culture, And The Boundaries Of The Criminal Law, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2003

Homicide On Holiday: Prosecutorial Discretion, Popular Culture, And The Boundaries Of The Criminal Law, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

This article discusses prosecutors' discretion to press criminal charges against individuals who cause death during recreational activities. Based on newspaper sources, published opinions, and unpublished materials from cases that resulted in plea bargains, Homicide on Holiday continues the author's exploration of the relationship between the American public, criminal prosecutors, and the nature of the prosecutors' public role. It shows that, despite popular culture's glorification of risk and a nationwide trend in tort law toward sheltering sports co-participants from civil negligence liability, an exhilarating trip down a ski slope is increasingly likely to land a skier in jail if ...