Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2003

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Protecting The Rights Of Indigenous Cultures Under The Current Intellectual Property System: Is It A Good Idea?, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 88 (2003), Juan Andrés Fuentes Jan 2003

Protecting The Rights Of Indigenous Cultures Under The Current Intellectual Property System: Is It A Good Idea?, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 88 (2003), Juan Andrés Fuentes

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Globalization and digital communication trends have provided new avenues and incentives for the commercial use of the folkloric artwork of indigenous peoples. Such commercial uses, however, have occurred largely without any creative control or financial benefit inuring to the original creators, people, or tribe of whom the artistic works form an integral part of their culture. Since much of the works are owned by a community as a whole, as opposed to being owned by individuals, it is difficult to fit such works into an intellectual property regime that is based on laws formed around Western notions of art and ...


No-Copy Technology And The Copyright Act: Has The Music Industry Been Allowed To Go Too Far In Diminishing The Consumers’ Personal Use Rights In The Digital World?, 2 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 337 (2003), Kevin C. Earle Jan 2003

No-Copy Technology And The Copyright Act: Has The Music Industry Been Allowed To Go Too Far In Diminishing The Consumers’ Personal Use Rights In The Digital World?, 2 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 337 (2003), Kevin C. Earle

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Record companies have in recent years begun production of compact discs containing “no-copy” technology. These CDs appear to be classic CDs but are alleged to have poorer sound quality and often will not play in computers. The recording industryhas used this and other methods to stem the increasing popularity of CD copying and unauthorized music file distribution online. While the right of copyright owners to protect their intellectual property is well established, it is arguable that the methoddescribed herein interferes with a consumer’s right to make personal use of legally purchased content. Such right is alleged to stem from ...