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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

2008

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Copyright Misuses, Fair Use, And Abuse: How Sports And Media Companies Are Overreaching Their Copyright Protections, 7 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 621 (2008), Cory Tadlock Jan 2008

Copyright Misuses, Fair Use, And Abuse: How Sports And Media Companies Are Overreaching Their Copyright Protections, 7 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 621 (2008), Cory Tadlock

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

A recent FTC complaint has generated questions about the legality and effects of blanket copyright warnings issued by large sports and media companies. Copyright warnings from the NFL, MLB, and major motion picture studios often assert that no use whatsoever of their materials can be made without express permission, contrary to several provisions of U.S. copyright law. This comment proposes limiting the content and language of such warnings so consumers have a clearer view of what copyright law allows, and are not intimidated into foregoing their rights to use protected works. Exceptions like fair use and the idea-expression dichotomy ...


Honoring Trademarks: The Battle To Preserve Native American Imagery In The National Collegiate Athletic Association, 7 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 735 (2008), Ian Botnick Jan 2008

Honoring Trademarks: The Battle To Preserve Native American Imagery In The National Collegiate Athletic Association, 7 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 735 (2008), Ian Botnick

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

On August 5, 2005, the National Collegiate Athletic Association introduced its plan to end the use of Native American mascots, nicknames and imagery. Schools were required to change their offensive nicknames and mascots and were forced to stop using trademarks bearing Native American imagery. The NCAA ban presents the question of whether schools affected by the ban can bring a trademark action against the NCAA. One interpretation of trademark law provides a school with no redress because the NCAA has not created a competing mark. However, the other interpretation of trademark law provides a school with a valid trademark claim ...