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The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

2004

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

“Shamnesty” Vs. Amnesty: Can The Riaa Grant Immunity To File-Sharers From Copyright Infringement Lawsuits?, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 279 (2004), Natosha Cuyler-Sherman Jan 2004

“Shamnesty” Vs. Amnesty: Can The Riaa Grant Immunity To File-Sharers From Copyright Infringement Lawsuits?, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 279 (2004), Natosha Cuyler-Sherman

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is the industry trade association for sound and music recordings and represents various music companies, songwriters, and music artists. One of the main functions of the RIAA is to enforce its members’ copyrights. The RIAA is currently representing members in copyright infringement lawsuits. As an alternative to being sued, the RIAA announced that it would grant amnesty to file sharers who voluntarily identified themselves and promised to stop illegally sharing music. In reality, non-RIAA members and even RIAA members themselves can still sue file sharers because the organization itself does not have the ...


“Intellectual Alchemy”: Securitization Of Intellectual Property As An Innovative Form Of Alternative Financing, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 307 (2004), John M. Gabala Jr. Jan 2004

“Intellectual Alchemy”: Securitization Of Intellectual Property As An Innovative Form Of Alternative Financing, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 307 (2004), John M. Gabala Jr.

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

While asset-securitization has been around since the early 1980’s, prior to the now widely known structuring of musician David Bowie’s music catalogue into saleable bonds in 1997, music royalties and copyrights were never before used in a securitization. At the time, Bowie’s catalogue had a proven royalty track record; however, the valuation of the actual bonds remained untested in the illegal music-downloading era of today. This comment explores the benefits of intellectual property-based securitizations and their common valuation approaches. In addition, it is argued that appropriate credit enhancements should be employed to protect future Bowie bond style ...


Football's Intellectual Side: The Nfl Versus Super Bowl Parties And The Story Of The Fifty-Five Inch Television, 4 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 125 (2004), Michael M. Fenwick Jan 2004

Football's Intellectual Side: The Nfl Versus Super Bowl Parties And The Story Of The Fifty-Five Inch Television, 4 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 125 (2004), Michael M. Fenwick

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The increasing popularity of the National Football League’s Super Bowl Championship has spawned an increasing number of private parties, some that employ projection-screen televisions measuring up to twenty feet diagonally. Only days before the 2004 Super Bowl, the NFL sent cease-and-desist letters to a number of business proprietors claiming display of the broadcast on televisions larger than fifty-five inches diagonally violated the NFL’s rights under 17 U.S.C. § 110(5). This Comment will show that because 17 U.S.C. § 110(5) was written to protect authors within the music industry, its application to broadcast television fails ...