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The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

The Ambush At Rio, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 350 (2017), Adam Epstein Jan 2017

The Ambush At Rio, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 350 (2017), Adam Epstein

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The purpose of this article is to explore the role of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) codified marketing policy known as Rule 40 which emerged to prevent ambush marketing of its biennial events. Rule 40 has quickly evolved into a controversial rule for athletes, coaches and sponsors alike who are involved in the Olympic Movement. The IOC believes that social media is a ubiquitous threat to its intellectual property during the Olympic Games akin to traditional print and television ambush marketing campaigns. As a result, the 2016 Rio De Janeiro (Rio) Summer Olympic Games represented the most intense clash ...


If It's In The Game: Is There Liability For User-Generated Characters' Likeness?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 291 (2017), Jason Zenor Jan 2017

If It's In The Game: Is There Liability For User-Generated Characters' Likeness?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 291 (2017), Jason Zenor

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

In cases like Keller and No Doubt v. Activision, the federal courts held that the use of celebrity's likeness was a violation of the right of publicity. In response, EA Sports suspended production of college sports games. But most games still allow for gamers to create their own avatars. With game systems now being connected, gamers can download user-created content many of which will have the likeness of famous people, thus circumventing the holdings in Keller and No Doubt. Accordingly, this article examines how this type of user generated content fits within the law of appropriation. First, this article ...


Restoring Rogers: Video Games, False Association Claims, And The “Explicitly Misleading” Use Of Trademarks, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 306 (2017), William K. Ford Jan 2017

Restoring Rogers: Video Games, False Association Claims, And The “Explicitly Misleading” Use Of Trademarks, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 306 (2017), William K. Ford

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Courts have long struggled with how to balance false association claims brought under the Lanham Act with the protections for speech under the First Amendment. The leading approach is the Rogers test, but this test comes in multiple forms with varying degrees of protection for speech. A substantial portion of the litigation raising this issue now involves video games, a medium that more so than others, likely needs the benefit of a clear rule that protects speech. The original version of the test is the simplest and the one most protective of speech. In 2013, the Ninth Circuit endorsed the ...


Student-Athletes Put Full-Court Pressure On The Ncaa For Their Rights, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 276 (2016), Taylor Riskin Jan 2016

Student-Athletes Put Full-Court Pressure On The Ncaa For Their Rights, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 276 (2016), Taylor Riskin

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The struggle between the NCAA and student-athletes is one that will not slow down. The issue is whether the mandatory student-athlete agreement is reasonable and, further, if student-athletes should be compensated for the use of their likeness? The answers to these questions are crucial with over a century of tradition on the line. This comment analyzes the recent Ninth Circuit decision through an antitrust and right of publicity lens. Additionally, this comment proposes a solution that allows student-athletes to receive some type of compensation while the NCAA preserves amateurism.


The Depiction Of Trademarked Landmarks In Fictional Films: Protecting Filmmakers From Infringement And Dilution Liability, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 676 (2016), Joel Timmer Jan 2016

The Depiction Of Trademarked Landmarks In Fictional Films: Protecting Filmmakers From Infringement And Dilution Liability, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 676 (2016), Joel Timmer

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Many well-known landmarks, like the Empire State Building, are protected as trademarks. This trademark status may be used by trademark holders to attempt to control or limit the depictions of those landmarks in artistic works like feature films. Using the trademarked Hollywood Sign as an example, this article examines the status of landmarks as trademarks as well as the protections trademark holders have over unauthorized depictions of trademarked landmarks through actions for trademark infringement or trademark dilution. Concluding that trademark dilution is more likely the proper cause of action for the unauthorized depiction of trademarks in films, this article then ...


That Old Familiar Sting: Tattoos, Publicity, And Copyright, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 762 (2016), Matthew Parker Jan 2016

That Old Familiar Sting: Tattoos, Publicity, And Copyright, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 762 (2016), Matthew Parker

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Tattoos have experienced a significant rise in popularity over the last several decades, and in particular an explosion in popularity in the 2000s and 2010s. Despite this rising popularity and acceptance, the actual mechanics of tattoo ownership and copyright remain very much an issue of first impression before the courts. A series of high-priced lawsuits involving famous athletes and celebrities have come close to the Supreme Court at times, but were ultimately settled before any precedent could be set. This article describes a history of tattoos and how they might be seen to fit in to existing copyright law, and ...


Bad News Birkins: Counterfeit In Luxury Brands, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 249 (2015), Colleen Jordan Orscheln Jan 2015

Bad News Birkins: Counterfeit In Luxury Brands, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 249 (2015), Colleen Jordan Orscheln

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The luxury fashion industry spends millions of dollars each year fighting counterfeits, yet a fake Louis Vuitton bag is easily purchased on street corners around the world. Proponents of the counterfeits argue that the fakes translate to advertising for the brands, while the luxury brands argue that it damages the future of their brand. The counterfeit market has been linked to child labor, human trafficking, organized crime, and some terrorist groups. The current federal civil and criminal statutes exclude purchasers from prosecution and instead focus on the distributors of the goods. This comment proposes the strengthening of these laws by ...


The Conflict Between An Athlete’S Right Of Publicity And The First Amendment, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 117 (2015), Edward Kuester Jan 2015

The Conflict Between An Athlete’S Right Of Publicity And The First Amendment, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 117 (2015), Edward Kuester

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The recent rise of fantasy sports has created a conflict between an athlete’s right of publicity and the First Amendment of the Constitution. The legal question being discussed is whether athletes have a right of publicity in their identity, specifically their performance statistics and biographical information. If a right of publicity violation does exist, courts will have to determine whether a fantasy provider’s First Amendment privilege can prevail against an athlete’s publicity rights. This comment examines recent litigation surrounding athletes’ identities and the problems courts have in balancing the conflict between an athlete’s right of publicity ...


Food Art: Protecting "Food Presentation" Under U.S. Intellectual Property Law, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 1 (2014), Cathay Smith Jan 2014

Food Art: Protecting "Food Presentation" Under U.S. Intellectual Property Law, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 1 (2014), Cathay Smith

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

In 2006, a scandal broke in the culinary world. It was alleged that Robin Wickens, chef at (now closed) Interlude restaurant in Melbourne, Australia, had copied dishes by renowned American chefs Wylie Dufresne, Jose Andres, and Grant Achatz. It is not uncommon for chefs to borrow recipes from other chefs, and there has been a long culture of sharing in the cuisine industry. However, what made Wickens’ actions scandalous was that he had purportedly copied the artistic presentation and plating of other chefs’ dishes, not just their recipes.

This Article examines whether chefs can protect the artistic presentation or plating ...


As Seen On Tv: Your Compromising Cameo On National Reality Programming, 12 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 403 (2013), Ryan Westerman Jan 2013

As Seen On Tv: Your Compromising Cameo On National Reality Programming, 12 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 403 (2013), Ryan Westerman

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The pop-culture phenomenon of reality television has taken over national programming. With the click of a remote, viewers can gain an inside look into the daily lives of celebrity families, toddler pageant queens, wealthy housewives, even pregnant teenagers. Reality television also profiles different professions: repo-men, pawn shop owners, and real estate agents all have television time slots. While it seems everyone is desperate for their fifteen minutes of fame, there are still those who wish to avoid the public spotlight. However, a recent Illinois ruling may make avoiding prime-time attention impossible for certain individuals caught on tape in compromising, and ...


Outspoken: Social Media And The Modern College Athlete, 12 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 509 (2013), Meg Penrose Jan 2013

Outspoken: Social Media And The Modern College Athlete, 12 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 509 (2013), Meg Penrose

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution grants American citizens the right to free speech. However, in the case of college athletes, this right is not without limitation. In exchange for the privilege of participating in college level athletics, college athletes voluntarily agree to terms that restrict their abilities to speak freely, specifically in the context of social media platforms. This article details situations in which college athletes have made offensive statements via social media for which they later needed to delete, explain, and apologize. These examples support the notion that restrictions on college athletes’ speech are not only ...