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The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Indian and Aboriginal Law

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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray Jan 2016

Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The historical conditions under which indigenous (and specifically Native American) cultural heritage objects have been collected present tremendous difficulties, since collecting efforts were frequently influenced, or even directed, by racist or colonialist ideologies. Recent decades have seen efforts to redress past wrongs, as well as to correct misunderstandings and misrepresentations. The restitution and repatriation processes of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, enacted as human rights legislation, provide powerful, but imperfect tools for the protection of Native American cultural heritage. The challenges are both domestic and international. Recent French auction sales of Hopi, Zuni, and Navajo ...


Music As Cultural Heritage: Analysis Of The Means Of Preventing The Exploitation Of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 228 (2015), Ronald Inawat Jan 2015

Music As Cultural Heritage: Analysis Of The Means Of Preventing The Exploitation Of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 228 (2015), Ronald Inawat

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

What started out as a law school requirement quickly snowballed into an analysis of the relationship between intellectual property and cultural heritage. I am a music guy at heart, having played piano since I was five years old, having composed one song (after multiple tries), and now working directly with musicians and artists. So when I began researching a topic for an article that would connect the dots between the cultural heritage and its respective music, I could only come across legal doctrine and articles that focused heavily on tangible art and artifacts. So what happened to the music? After ...


A Context-Sensitive Inquiry: The Interpretation Of Meaning In Cases Of Visual Appropriation Art, 12 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 746 (2013), Elizabeth Winkowski Jan 2013

A Context-Sensitive Inquiry: The Interpretation Of Meaning In Cases Of Visual Appropriation Art, 12 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 746 (2013), Elizabeth Winkowski

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

As Andy Warhol’s famous depiction of a soup can has demonstrated, the meaning of a work depends on its context. While the Campbell’s label signified one thing to shoppers in supermarkets, it raised new questions when presented as a work of art. Warhol’s work is just one example of what has come to be known as appropriation art, an artistic practice that borrows and repurposes images from the media, popular culture, and other sources. Unsurprisingly, this art form is in frequent tension with copyright law. This comment suggests that in analyzing the“purpose and character” factor of ...


Honoring Trademarks: The Battle To Preserve Native American Imagery In The National Collegiate Athletic Association, 7 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 735 (2008), Ian Botnick Jan 2008

Honoring Trademarks: The Battle To Preserve Native American Imagery In The National Collegiate Athletic Association, 7 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 735 (2008), Ian Botnick

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

On August 5, 2005, the National Collegiate Athletic Association introduced its plan to end the use of Native American mascots, nicknames and imagery. Schools were required to change their offensive nicknames and mascots and were forced to stop using trademarks bearing Native American imagery. The NCAA ban presents the question of whether schools affected by the ban can bring a trademark action against the NCAA. One interpretation of trademark law provides a school with no redress because the NCAA has not created a competing mark. However, the other interpretation of trademark law provides a school with a valid trademark claim ...


Protecting The Rights Of Indigenous Cultures Under The Current Intellectual Property System: Is It A Good Idea?, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 88 (2003), Juan Andrés Fuentes Jan 2003

Protecting The Rights Of Indigenous Cultures Under The Current Intellectual Property System: Is It A Good Idea?, 3 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 88 (2003), Juan Andrés Fuentes

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Globalization and digital communication trends have provided new avenues and incentives for the commercial use of the folkloric artwork of indigenous peoples. Such commercial uses, however, have occurred largely without any creative control or financial benefit inuring to the original creators, people, or tribe of whom the artistic works form an integral part of their culture. Since much of the works are owned by a community as a whole, as opposed to being owned by individuals, it is difficult to fit such works into an intellectual property regime that is based on laws formed around Western notions of art and ...