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The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Comparative and Foreign Law

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja Jan 2017

Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article considers the current licensing regime used to control the exploitation of copyright protected works within the online interactive entertainment sector—particularly virtual worlds including multiplayer online games—to further author new copyrightable works. This article aims to identify the gaps that have arisen on account of the nature of these subsequently authored works and the potential for their exploitation under the said licensing regime. Users and the proprietors of virtual worlds often end up in conflict over the monetization and commercialization of user generated content on account of contradictory yet overlapping rights created by copyright law when controlled ...


The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage: A Crime Against Property Or A Crime Against People?, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 336 (2016), Patty Gerstenblith Jan 2016

The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage: A Crime Against Property Or A Crime Against People?, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 336 (2016), Patty Gerstenblith

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The destruction of cultural heritage has played a prominent role in the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Iraq and in the recent conflict in Mali. This destruction has displayed the failure of international law to effectively deter these actions. This article reviews existing international law in light of this destruction and the challenges posed by the issues of non-international armed conflict, non-state actors and the military necessity exception. By examining recent developments in applicable international law, the article proposes that customary international law has evolved to interpret existing legal instruments and doctrines concerning cultural heritage in light of the principles ...


From Tragedy To Triumph In The Pursuit Of Looted Art: Altmann, Benningson, Portrait Of Wally, Von Saher And Their Progeny, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 394 (2016), Donald Burris Jan 2016

From Tragedy To Triumph In The Pursuit Of Looted Art: Altmann, Benningson, Portrait Of Wally, Von Saher And Their Progeny, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 394 (2016), Donald Burris

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article is a broad and approachable overview of American law regarding the potential repatriation of Nazi-looted art—an area which the author and his now-retired partner, Randy Schoenberg, helped develop from the ground up starting with the development of the Altmann case, decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2004, and continuing on through a number of fascinating looted-art cases of a more recent vintage. Parts of the article read as much like a detective story as a summary of cases and Mr. Burris has been kind enough to share both his approach to these cases and his ...


Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray Jan 2016

Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The historical conditions under which indigenous (and specifically Native American) cultural heritage objects have been collected present tremendous difficulties, since collecting efforts were frequently influenced, or even directed, by racist or colonialist ideologies. Recent decades have seen efforts to redress past wrongs, as well as to correct misunderstandings and misrepresentations. The restitution and repatriation processes of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, enacted as human rights legislation, provide powerful, but imperfect tools for the protection of Native American cultural heritage. The challenges are both domestic and international. Recent French auction sales of Hopi, Zuni, and Navajo ...


Illusory Borders: The Myth Of The Modern Nation-State And Its Impact On The Repatriation Of Cultural Artifacts, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 486 (2016), Lubna El-Gendi Jan 2016

Illusory Borders: The Myth Of The Modern Nation-State And Its Impact On The Repatriation Of Cultural Artifacts, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 486 (2016), Lubna El-Gendi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

While the current world order of independent nation-states may seem like a natural state that has existed for centuries, in reality, it is a relatively new development that was forged after the demise of imperial rule. Yet, the nation-state is the foundational entity of our current international political and legal framework. International treaties and relations are structured around the nation-state, which is recognized as the core entity in which rights are vested and on which obligations are imposed. This prioritization of the nation-state leads to issues when we consider the repatriation of cultural heritage, particularly in light of the history ...


Let It Go? A Comparative Analysis Of Copyright Law And Enforcement In The United States Of America And China, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 584 (2016), Kevin Fleming Jan 2016

Let It Go? A Comparative Analysis Of Copyright Law And Enforcement In The United States Of America And China, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 584 (2016), Kevin Fleming

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Cheap, knockoff designer items have flooded the streets of China for years. These products infringe on the copyrights of the manufacturers but are rarely enforced. China has attempted to revise their copyright laws to offer more protection to copyright owners, but this has not yet occurred. This comment examines two recent occurrences of copyrighted works in the United States of America being infringed upon in China. This comment examines the how a court or tribunal would rule applying American copyright law and Chinese Copyright law, while also examining the possible remedies that could result. This comment also proposes possible solutions ...


Where Are We And Where Are We Going: Legal Developments In Cultural Property And Nazi Art Looting, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 435 (2016), Thomas Kline Jan 2016

Where Are We And Where Are We Going: Legal Developments In Cultural Property And Nazi Art Looting, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 435 (2016), Thomas Kline

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Cultural Plunder And Restitution And Human Identity, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 460 (2016), Ori Soltes Jan 2016

Cultural Plunder And Restitution And Human Identity, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 460 (2016), Ori Soltes

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


The Need For Originality: Music Infringement In India, 11 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 169 (2011), Harini Ganesh Jan 2011

The Need For Originality: Music Infringement In India, 11 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 169 (2011), Harini Ganesh

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

For decades, the Indian film industry has copied tunes from Western copyrighted works and created unauthorized derivatives. As the music and motion picture industries in the United States started taking notice of this copyright infringement, so too did Indian music directors as domestic infringers profited from copying. Despite the existence of an enacted copyright statute in India, and the nation’s membership with various international intellectual property treaties and conventions, enforcement continues to be poor. This lack of protection allows high-profile music directors in the Indian film industry to get away with copyright infringement. This comment proposes that India must ...