Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Duke Law & Technology Review

Media & Communications

Discipline
Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

What's In A Name: Cable Systems, Filmon, And Judicial Consideration Of The Applicability Of The Copyright Act's Compulsory License To Online Broadcasters Of Cable Content, Kathryn M. Boyd Feb 2017

What's In A Name: Cable Systems, Filmon, And Judicial Consideration Of The Applicability Of The Copyright Act's Compulsory License To Online Broadcasters Of Cable Content, Kathryn M. Boyd

Duke Law & Technology Review

The way we consume media today is vastly different from the way media was consumed in 1976, when the Copyright Act created the compulsory license for cable systems. The compulsory license allowed cable systems, as defined by the Copyright Act, to pay a set fee for the right to air television programming rather than working out individual deals with each group that owned the copyright in the programming, and helped make television more widely accessible to the viewing public. FilmOn, a company that uses a mini-antenna system to capture and retransmit broadcast network signals, is now seeking access to the ...


Aereo And Internet Television: A Call To Save The Dukes (A La Carte), Pooja Patel Jan 2016

Aereo And Internet Television: A Call To Save The Dukes (A La Carte), Pooja Patel

Duke Law & Technology Review

If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it is probably a duck. The most recent U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding the Copyright Act employed this “duck test” when determining that Aereo, an Internet content-streaming company, violated the Copyright Act by infringing on the copyrights of television broadcast networks. The Supreme Court ruled that Aereo's Internet streaming services resembled cable television transmissions too closely. Therefore, by streaming copyrighted programming to its subscribers without the cable compulsory license, Aereo violated the Transmit Clause of the 1976 Copyright Act. Subsequently, Aereo used this ...