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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 19 of 19

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Amateurism And The Ncaa: How A Changing Market Has Turned Caps On Athletic Scholarships Into An Antitrust Violation, Daniel Laws May 2017

Amateurism And The Ncaa: How A Changing Market Has Turned Caps On Athletic Scholarships Into An Antitrust Violation, Daniel Laws

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Amateurism And The Ncaa: How A Changing Market Has Turned Caps On Athletic Scholarships Into An Antitrust Violation, Daniel Laws Jan 2017

Amateurism And The Ncaa: How A Changing Market Has Turned Caps On Athletic Scholarships Into An Antitrust Violation, Daniel Laws

Law Student Publications

The college athletics industry is worth $16 billion, and it only continues to grow as the number of collegiate students and student-athletes increases. The governing body of collegiate athletics, the National Collegiate Athletic Association ("NCAA"), prides itself on the amateur status of its athletes. To preserve its athletes' amateurism, the NCAA mandates that its member institutions agree not to compensate student-athletes with athletic scholarships that are above the university's cost of attendance. Typically, this type of horizontal agreement- one between competitors that artificially caps the amount a worker can earn violates Section 1 of the Sherman Act as an ...


Brazil's Olympic-Era Anti-Corruption Reforms, Andrew B. Spalding Jan 2017

Brazil's Olympic-Era Anti-Corruption Reforms, Andrew B. Spalding

Law Faculty Publications

A country once renowned for glorifying corruption now leads what may be the furthest-reaching anti-corruption investigation in history. Brazil, once typified by its "Brazilian jeitinho" way of creatively navigating social problems,' now executes "Operation Car Wash," bringing down political and business leaders by the dozens. So too has Brazil's Congress adopted a series of dramatic, and effective, new anti-corruption laws, in response to public outcries for reform. It is deeply ironic, but not at all coincidental, that Brazil concurrently hosted the Summer Olympics. This paper chronicles the extraordinary series of events that connect - in a line that is straight ...


Uniform Rules: Addressing The Disparate Rules That Deny Student-Athletes The Opportunity To Participate In Sports According To Gender Identity, Chelsea Shrader Jan 2017

Uniform Rules: Addressing The Disparate Rules That Deny Student-Athletes The Opportunity To Participate In Sports According To Gender Identity, Chelsea Shrader

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Red Card For Fifa: Corruption And Scandal In The World’S Foremost Sports Association, Chance Esposito Jan 2016

A Red Card For Fifa: Corruption And Scandal In The World’S Foremost Sports Association, Chance Esposito

Law Student Publications

On a global scale, soccer (or as it is commonly called in most other countries “football”) is the most popular sport based on its numbers alone with over 250 million players. In recent years, the sport has become increasingly popular in nations or territories such as the United States. As a result of this increased interest, the sport and its governing organization, The Federation Internationale de Football Association (“FIFA”), has been thrown into the global media arena in the past two decades. Recently unearthed information, however, has put the actions of the organization at the center of controversy for alleged ...


Danger In The Dmca Safe Harbors: The Need To Narrow What Constitutes Red Flag Knowledge, Hank Fisher Jan 2015

Danger In The Dmca Safe Harbors: The Need To Narrow What Constitutes Red Flag Knowledge, Hank Fisher

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Ncaa And The Student-Athlete: Reform Is On The Horizon, Mary Grace Miller May 2012

The Ncaa And The Student-Athlete: Reform Is On The Horizon, Mary Grace Miller

Law Student Publications

This comment examines the NCAA's rules and regulations of student-athletes and explores the possibility that the NCAA's existence, under its current bylaws and manual, is at least immoral and likely unlawful. Additionally, this comment analyzes the idea that the NCAA needs not only internal restructuring but judicial and possibly congressional intervention in order to truly protect young athletes' financial, academic, and basic human interests. Part II of this comment explores the historical development of the NCAA and the current relationship between the NCAA and the student-athlete. Part III discusses the fundamental unfairness in the NCAA's bylaws, which ...


Your Retirement To-Do List: Enjoy Each Day, Suzanne B. Corriell Apr 2010

Your Retirement To-Do List: Enjoy Each Day, Suzanne B. Corriell

Law Faculty Publications

Author provides a variety of activities and entertaining options for retired professionals.


The Reverse-Morals Clause: The Unique Way To Save Talent's Reputation And Money In A New Era Of Corporate Crimes And Scandals, Porcher L. Taylor Iii, Fernando M. Pinguelo, Timothy D. Cedrone Jan 2010

The Reverse-Morals Clause: The Unique Way To Save Talent's Reputation And Money In A New Era Of Corporate Crimes And Scandals, Porcher L. Taylor Iii, Fernando M. Pinguelo, Timothy D. Cedrone

School of Professional and Continuing Studies Faculty Publications

This article sails into the largely unchartered waters of reverse-morals clauses because, to our knowledge, there are no law review or law journal articles that substantially address this still nascent area of law.25 Similarly, our research has not revealed any state or federal cases involving reverse-morals clauses.26 Nor has an actual talent contract containing such a clause been publicly revealed, either in terms of language or the identification of the parties to such a clause,27 although reportedly "an increasingly larger number" of talent are now asking for reverse-morals clauses in the wake of the Enron fallout and ...


How “Choruss” Can Turn Into A Cacophony: The Record Industry’S Stranglehold On The Future Of Music Business, Andrey Spektor Jan 2009

How “Choruss” Can Turn Into A Cacophony: The Record Industry’S Stranglehold On The Future Of Music Business, Andrey Spektor

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

A sixty year-old man is delighted when his son shows him how to use Pandora—an interactive, hip Internet radio site that puts the listener in control. Having grown up a huge Louis Armstrong fan, the man quickly selects the jazz singer as one of his “stations.” When listening to this station, Pandora will only play songs by Armstrong and other similar artists for him. When he hears Armstrong’s classic, “What a Wonderful World,” the man immediately clicks the “Thumbs Up” icon, indicating his approval of Pandora’s recommendation. Pandora’s recommendations are drawn from its “Music Genome Project ...


Live Performance, Copyright, And The Future Of The Music Business, Mark F. Schultz Jan 2009

Live Performance, Copyright, And The Future Of The Music Business, Mark F. Schultz

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Pro Teams Should Reward Good Off-Field Behavior, Porcher L. Taylor Iii, David R. Maraghy Jan 2007

Pro Teams Should Reward Good Off-Field Behavior, Porcher L. Taylor Iii, David R. Maraghy

School of Professional and Continuing Studies Faculty Publications

Professional sports—particularly the NFL and NBA, whose players clearly are behavioral models for kids and even young adults—should join the cash-for-performance movement by rewarding players for their exemplary good citizenship off the field. Why not reward integrity-passionate athletes like Matt Hasselbeck of the Seattle Seahawks or Willie McGinest of the Cleveland Browns with annual bonuses of $100,000 each—or donate that amount to their favorite charities? Such a bonus program would require more than being scandal-or police-blotter-free for a year. To qualify, players would have to travel at the highest moral altitude of sports ambassadorship and citizenship ...


Globe Newspaper Co. V. Commonwealth: An Examination Of The Media’S “Right” To Retest Postconviction Dna Evidence, Emily S. Munro Jan 2003

Globe Newspaper Co. V. Commonwealth: An Examination Of The Media’S “Right” To Retest Postconviction Dna Evidence, Emily S. Munro

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

In January of 2000, Governor George Ryan of Illinois issued a statewide moratorium on capital punishment, citing among his reasons the fact that more convicted killers had been exonerated than executed since Illinois reinstated the death penalty in 1977. In 2001 Maryland’s governor issued a temporary moratorium on capital punishment, pending the results of a University of Maryland death penalty study. The North Carolina Senate recently approved a bill that would suspend all state executions for two years, after twenty-one North Carolina municipalities passed resolutions favoring a moratorium and two death-row inmates were awarded new trials.


Riaa V. Diamond Multimedia Systems: The Recording Industry Attempts To Slow The Mp3 Revolution, Taking Aim At The Jogger Friendly Diamond Rio, Stephen W. Webb Jan 2000

Riaa V. Diamond Multimedia Systems: The Recording Industry Attempts To Slow The Mp3 Revolution, Taking Aim At The Jogger Friendly Diamond Rio, Stephen W. Webb

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

The music industry may never be the same again. In recent years, the recording industry has faced an onslaught of advances resulting from digital technology. The record industry has battled the manufacturing and import industries over digital home recording since the 1980's. Digital technology initially manifested itself with the compact disc ("CD") and the digital audio tape ("DAT") in the early 1980's and generated greater tensions between the recording, electronics, and computer industries.


Update: Riaa V. Diamond Multimedia Systems - Napster And Mp3.Com, Jayne A. Pemberton A. Pemberton Jan 2000

Update: Riaa V. Diamond Multimedia Systems - Napster And Mp3.Com, Jayne A. Pemberton A. Pemberton

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

After the Recording Industry Association of America's ("RIAA") attack on the Diamond Rio proved unsuccessful, the music industry turned its attention to the companies enabling reproduction of copyrighted music. Two important cases appeared after the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that Diamond Rio was not infringing on copyrights. These cases, A&M Records, Inc. et al. v. Napster, Inc. and UMG, Inc., et. al. v. MP3.com, Inc., will shape computer technology's effect on American copyright law. This update will discuss these two cases and give brief overviews of the courts' findings and ...


Cable Television Update-Capital Cities Cable, Inc. V. Crisp: Federalism And Frustration Of Powers, Steven J. Keeler Jan 1984

Cable Television Update-Capital Cities Cable, Inc. V. Crisp: Federalism And Frustration Of Powers, Steven J. Keeler

University of Richmond Law Review

The Supreme Court of the United States recently stunned the cable television industry with its decision in Capital Cities Cable, Inc. v. Crisp. The immediate result of the ruling was to preempt a state statute prohibiting the advertisement of certain alcoholic beverages; however, the decision's potential impact could be much broader. The Court unanimously held cable television regulation to be the "exclusive domain" of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and an "area that the Commission has explicitly pre-empted." Thus, the decision extends broad regulatory authority to the FCC at the expense of local control.


Admissibility Of "Day In The Life" Films In Virginia, Mahlon G. Funk Jr., Harry J. Hicks Iii Jan 1984

Admissibility Of "Day In The Life" Films In Virginia, Mahlon G. Funk Jr., Harry J. Hicks Iii

University of Richmond Law Review

In recent years, audiovisual technology has taken an increasingly prominent position in courtroom procedures. Defense attorneys have traditionally introduced motion pictures of allegedly injured plaintiffs caught in some intense physical activity. More recently, courts have allowed the use of audiovisual depositions, which afford scrutiny of the characteristics and mannerisms of deposed witnesses. In the midst of this evidentiary trend, plaintiffs' counsel now frequently seek admission of "day in the life" films. Such films purport to depict for the jury in graphic detail the effects that a severe personal injury can have on the plaintiff's life. Admission of these films ...


Board Of Regents Of University Of Oklahoma V. National Collegiate Athletic Association, Application Of The Per Se Rule To Price-Fixing Agreements, Robert M. Pfeifer Jan 1983

Board Of Regents Of University Of Oklahoma V. National Collegiate Athletic Association, Application Of The Per Se Rule To Price-Fixing Agreements, Robert M. Pfeifer

University of Richmond Law Review

In Board of Regents of University of Oklahoma v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a lower court ruling that invalidated regulation of college football television contracts by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). This decision left colleges and universities free to contract for the sale of broadcast rights to their football games. The United States District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma held that the NCAA television foot- ball plan and network contracts constituted an illegal price-fixing agreement and thus were per se violations of section 1 of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. The ...


The Legality Of Ticket Tie-Ins In Intercollegiate Athletics, Arthur D. Austin Jan 1980

The Legality Of Ticket Tie-Ins In Intercollegiate Athletics, Arthur D. Austin

University of Richmond Law Review

The dynamics of operating a "major" intercollegiate sports program have a tenuous nexus with academic ideals. Intercollegiate athletics is now a big business, dominated by the balance sheet of gate receipts, T.V. revenues, and talent recruiting. The best high school athletes are aggressively recruited for their physical prowess to play for teams that perform before large crowds-and frequently a national television audience-in gigantic stadiums and field houses. In many instances coaches and players gain national recognition and reverence unequaled by professors, poets, or Nobel prize winners. Yet the sponsors of these sports extravaganzas are academic institutions who by charter ...