Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

SelectedWorks

Discipline
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
File Type

Articles 31 - 60 of 162

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Trademark Law And The Prickly Ambivalence Of Post-Parodies, Charles E. Colman Aug 2014

Trademark Law And The Prickly Ambivalence Of Post-Parodies, Charles E. Colman

Charles E. Colman

This Essay examines what I call "post-parodies" in apparel. This emerging genre of do-it-yourself fashion is characterized by the appropriation and modification of third-party trademarks — not for the sake of dismissively mocking or zealously glorifying luxury fashion, but rather to engage in more complex forms of expression. I examine the cultural circumstances and psychological factors giving rise to post-parodic fashion, and conclude that the sensibility causing its proliferation is one grounded in ambivalence. Unfortunately, current doctrine governing trademark parodies cannot begin to make sense of post-parodic goods; among other shortcomings, that doctrine suffers from crude analytical tools and a cramped ...


Off-Road Torts: The Difficulties Of Representing A Client Injured Due To Defects In Vehicles Modified For Off-Road Use Or Injured Due To A Dangerous Condition Of The Land., Nicholas Morgan Jun 2014

Off-Road Torts: The Difficulties Of Representing A Client Injured Due To Defects In Vehicles Modified For Off-Road Use Or Injured Due To A Dangerous Condition Of The Land., Nicholas Morgan

Nicholas Morgan

No abstract provided.


Invalid Pre-Termination Grants And The Challenge To Obtain A Remedy, Samuel H. Jones May 2014

Invalid Pre-Termination Grants And The Challenge To Obtain A Remedy, Samuel H. Jones

Samuel H Jones

The 1976 Copyright Act created what is now commonly known as the termination right, which allows authors to unilaterally terminate prior grants of their copyrights and reclaim ownership. This right was created, in large part, to liberate authors from unremunerative agreements previously entered into when the value of their copyrighted works had not yet been realized. It can be a powerful tool for authors to leverage more favorable agreements than they were previously able, particularly when those copyrights are highly valued. To ensure authors’ ability to exercise this right, Congress enacted provisions in the 1976 Copyright Act that prohibit authors ...


Friend Or Faux: The Trademark Counterfeiting Act's Inability To Stop The Sale Of Counterfeit Sporting Goods, Jennifer Riso Apr 2014

Friend Or Faux: The Trademark Counterfeiting Act's Inability To Stop The Sale Of Counterfeit Sporting Goods, Jennifer Riso

Jennifer Riso

The demand for counterfeit sporting goods, such as jerseys and other apparel, is on the rise as the prices of authentic goods continue to increase. The Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984 criminalizes the import and sale of counterfeit goods, but is ineffective at addressing the demand side of counterfeit goods. This paper analyzes the history behind the Act and recommends ways to ensure that the act will stay relevant as technology makes it easier to purchase counterfeit goods.


The Transmit Clause Test: A Pragmatic Approach To A Contemporary Understanding Of The Ambiguity In The Copyright Act’S Transmit Clause, Samantha Tilipman Apr 2014

The Transmit Clause Test: A Pragmatic Approach To A Contemporary Understanding Of The Ambiguity In The Copyright Act’S Transmit Clause, Samantha Tilipman

Samantha Tilipman

The 1976 Copyright Act was a response to development of new technology and an attempt to clarify copyright law to promote further investment in the burgeoning sphere of cable systems.[1] In drafting the provisions of the new Act, Congress created the “Transmit Clause,” a key passage nestled into the definition of “to perform or display a work ‘publicly.’”[2]The ambiguity of the Transmit Clause has led the circuits to interpret it differently leading to conflicting caselaw on opposite ends of the nation. The purpose of this note is to provide the Supreme Court of the United States and ...


Decoding Bollywood’S Royalty-Sharing Conundrum, Pralika Jain Apr 2014

Decoding Bollywood’S Royalty-Sharing Conundrum, Pralika Jain

Pralika Jain

India’s film making community and business got „industry‟ status only in 2011. However, unlike major industries such as telecom and pharmaceutical, the film industry (popularly known as “Bollywood”) is characterised by a major lack of legal rules and institutions to administer them, the problem being most acute in respect of artists. Consequently, the industry is governed completely by market forces whose successful players wield nearly all the bargaining power. It’s almost baffling that a film industry which is currently worlds second in terms of revenue is so thinly regulated.


New Jersey Goes “All In” For Sports Gambling: Examining The Constitutionality Of The Professional And Amateur Sports Protection Act, Tyler W. Mullen Apr 2014

New Jersey Goes “All In” For Sports Gambling: Examining The Constitutionality Of The Professional And Amateur Sports Protection Act, Tyler W. Mullen

Tyler W Mullen

Despite being illegal in all but a handful of U.S. jurisdictions, sports gambling has developed into a multi-million dollar industry. Eager to capitalize on the potential revenues, New Jersey recently challenged the constitutionality of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (“PASPA”), the federal sports gambling law. PASPA effectively prohibits the vast majority of states from operating or sanctioning sports gambling schemes. However, the particular methods that PASPA uses to achieve this objective raise serious federalism concerns. While the Third Circuit recently rejected New Jersey’s constitutional challenges to PASPA, this Comment argues that the court reached the wrong ...


N.I.G.G.A., Slumdog, Dyke, Jap, And Heeb: Reconsidering Disparaging Trademarks In A Post-Racial Era, Amanda E. Compton Mar 2014

N.I.G.G.A., Slumdog, Dyke, Jap, And Heeb: Reconsidering Disparaging Trademarks In A Post-Racial Era, Amanda E. Compton

Amanda E. Compton

Currently registration of disparaging trademarks is prohibited under Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act. Recent events, however, should reinvigorate the debate about the protection and registration of disparaging marks: (1) recent decisions published by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) that continue to address and highlight the issues surrounding the registration of disparaging marks; (2) a proposed federal act that would not only specifically bar the registration of any trademark that includes the word “redskins,” but would also retroactively cancel any existing registration that consist of or includes that term; and (3) an amendment to a state act ...


Bias In The College Football Playoff Selection Process: If The Devil Is In The Details, That's Where Salvation May Be Found, Matthew M. Heekin, Bruce W. Burton Feb 2014

Bias In The College Football Playoff Selection Process: If The Devil Is In The Details, That's Where Salvation May Be Found, Matthew M. Heekin, Bruce W. Burton

Matthew M. Heekin

After sixteen years, the Bowl College Series (“BCS”) format for selecting a national college football champion has ended. Beginning in 2014, the BCS format will be replaced by the College Football Playoff (“CFP”) format. Unlike the BCS, which utilized a formula comprised of two human polls and one computer generated poll to match the number one ranked college football team against the number two ranked team, the CFP utilizes a four team playoff in post-season play. Without quantified standards or computer input, a CFP selection committee comprised of thirteen people will annually select four finalists to participate in two semi-final ...


Applying The Non-Profit Duty Of Obedience In Litigation: Penn State, Paterno, Student-Athletes, & The Ncaa, Joseph M. Long Jan 2014

Applying The Non-Profit Duty Of Obedience In Litigation: Penn State, Paterno, Student-Athletes, & The Ncaa, Joseph M. Long

Joseph M Long

The fiduciary duty of obedience standard for non-profit leaders may offer a means to either externally challenge or internally refocus the decision-making of the NCAA leadership. The duty of obedience standard, as a tool in litigation, has been infrequently used. Nevertheless, a duty of obedience claim, if brought by the proper party, can complement or enhance an antitrust claim. As this paper will show, NCAA antitrust arguments often consider whether the NCAA has promoted amateur intercollegiate athletic competition. These arguments focus upon the NCAA’s mission statement and purpose. Since the mission statement is already a component of the antitrust ...


The Evolution Of The Digital Millennium Copyright Act; Changing Interpretations Of The Dmca And Future Implications For Copyright Holders, Hillary A. Henderson Jan 2014

The Evolution Of The Digital Millennium Copyright Act; Changing Interpretations Of The Dmca And Future Implications For Copyright Holders, Hillary A. Henderson

Hillary A Henderson

Copyright law rewards an artificial monopoly to individual authors for their creations. This reward is based on the belief that, by granting authors the exclusive right to reproduce their works, they receive an incentive and means to create, which in turn advances the welfare of the general public by “promoting the progress of science and useful arts.” Copyright protection subsists . . . in original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device . . . . In no ...


Picture [Im]Perfect: Photoshop Redefining Beauty In Cosmetic Advertisements, Giving False Advertising A Run For The Money, Ashley R. Brown Jan 2014

Picture [Im]Perfect: Photoshop Redefining Beauty In Cosmetic Advertisements, Giving False Advertising A Run For The Money, Ashley R. Brown

Ashley R Brown

This paper discusses the use of Photoshop in the United States and when overly retouched ads cross the threshold into False Advertising. I consider opinions from the NAD and whether or not a "Photoshop Law" would ever be feasible in the United States.


New Models And Conflicts In The Interconnection And Delivery, Rob Frieden Jan 2014

New Models And Conflicts In The Interconnection And Delivery, Rob Frieden

Rob Frieden

As the Internet has evolved and diversified, interconnection terms and conditions have changed between Internet Service Providers (“ISPs”). These carriers experiment with alternatives to conventional models that classify interconnection as either peering or transiting. The former typically involves interconnection between high capacity carriers whose transoceanic traffic volumes generally match thereby eliminating the need for a transfer of funds. Historically smaller carriers have paid transit fees to larger Tier-1 ISPs for the opportunity to secure upstream links throughout the Internet cloud. With the growing availability of bandwidth intensive, video content carried via the Internet, traffic volume disparities have increased between ISPs ...


Net Bias And The Treatment Of “Mission-Critical” Bits, Rob Frieden Jan 2014

Net Bias And The Treatment Of “Mission-Critical” Bits, Rob Frieden

Rob Frieden

The Internet increasingly provides an alternative distribution medium for video and other types of high value, bandwidth intensive content. Many consumers have become “technology agnostic” about what kind of wireline or wireless medium provides service. However, they expect carriers to offer access anytime, anywhere, via any device and in any distribution format. These early adopters of new technologies and alternatives to “legacy” media have no patience with the concept of “appointment television” that limits access to a specific time, on a particular channel and in a single presentation format. This paper assesses whether and how Internet Service Providers (“ISPs”) can ...


Creative Equity: A Practical Approach To The Actor's Copyright, Sarah Howes Jan 2014

Creative Equity: A Practical Approach To The Actor's Copyright, Sarah Howes

Sarah A Howes

In 2014, the 9th circuit declared in Garcia v. Google that an actor's contribution to a short, controversial YouTube video was copyrightable material. This holding permitted the actor to enjoin YouTube from distributing the work on its webpage. This article discusses the actor's copyright by looking at the basic requirements of copyrightability, industry specific concerns and the conflicting public policy arguments therein. The thesis requests that a dramatic performance be categorized as copyrightable material under the U.S. Copyright Act.


Out Of 'Control': The Operation Gold Exception And The Ncaa’S Susceptibility To Lawsuit Under Title Vi, Rob C. Burns Dec 2013

Out Of 'Control': The Operation Gold Exception And The Ncaa’S Susceptibility To Lawsuit Under Title Vi, Rob C. Burns

Rob C Burns

This Note looks at the bylaws of the NCAA and argues that certain bylaws concerning athletes competing in the Olympic Games, which permit American athletes to receive medal bonuses that their foreign counterparts cannot, are discriminatory on the basis of national origin in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act.


When Is Minority Not Minority: Ncaa Ignores Two Centuries Of Anglo-American Contract Law Respecting Legal Status, Matthew M. Heekin, Bruce W. Burton Sep 2013

When Is Minority Not Minority: Ncaa Ignores Two Centuries Of Anglo-American Contract Law Respecting Legal Status, Matthew M. Heekin, Bruce W. Burton

Matthew M. Heekin

No abstract provided.


The Impact Of The Jobs Act On Independent Film Finance, Sahil Chaudry Sep 2013

The Impact Of The Jobs Act On Independent Film Finance, Sahil Chaudry

Sahil Chaudry

While the 2008 financial crisis fundamentally altered the capital structure of the indie film, the JOBS Act will fundamentally augment capital sources available to the indie film industry at the time it is most starved. The onset of the U.S. recession, triggered by the 2008 economic crisis, substantially reduced the capital markets for the production of independent films. In an effort to stimulate economic growth for business start-ups, Congress passed the JOBS Act in March 2012. Two provisions of the JOBS Act present the independent (“indie”) film industry the opportunity to expand its capital markets. The first provision is ...


Reburying An Injustice: Indigenous Human Remains In Museums And The Evolving Obligations To Return Remains To Indigenous Groups, Alex Bernick Aug 2013

Reburying An Injustice: Indigenous Human Remains In Museums And The Evolving Obligations To Return Remains To Indigenous Groups, Alex Bernick

Alex Bernick

No abstract provided.


The Apocalyptic Presidential Right Of Publicity, Michael G. Bennett Aug 2013

The Apocalyptic Presidential Right Of Publicity, Michael G. Bennett

Michael G. Bennett

The Apocalyptic Presidential Right of Publicity

Michael G Bennett Associate Professor Northeastern School of Law

Abstract

This article critically examines publicity rights doctrine as applied to celebrity political figures. It is particularly concerned with the prominence of science fictional concepts, theoretical frameworks and tropes in cases that mark the extreme scope of the doctrine and in the scholarship that aims to render case law rationally meaningful. And it situates President Obama and the difficult doctrinal issues his candidacy and subsequent election highlighted at the center of its analysis.

Part one of the article briefly describes the right of publicity and ...


Slaves To Copyright: Branding Human Flesh As A Tangible Medium Of Expression, Arrielle S. Millstein Aug 2013

Slaves To Copyright: Branding Human Flesh As A Tangible Medium Of Expression, Arrielle S. Millstein

Arrielle S Millstein

This paper argues why human flesh, because of its inherent properties and its necessity for human survival, should not qualify as a tangible medium of expression under the Copyright Act of 1976. Through policy concerns and property law this paper demonstrates why the fixation requirement, necessary to obtain copyright protection of a “work,” must be flexible and eliminate human flesh as an acceptable, tangible medium of expression, to avoid the disastrous risk of the court falling into the role of “21st Century judicial slave masters.”


Ponderación Contra Fundamentalismo: Una Voz Razonable: Los Polémicos Casos De La Publicidad De Comida Chatarra, Las Cuotas De Artistas Nacionales En La Radio Y La Publicidad Sexista, Javier André Murillo Chávez Aug 2013

Ponderación Contra Fundamentalismo: Una Voz Razonable: Los Polémicos Casos De La Publicidad De Comida Chatarra, Las Cuotas De Artistas Nacionales En La Radio Y La Publicidad Sexista, Javier André Murillo Chávez

Javier André Murillo Chávez

No abstract provided.


Expanding The Inner Circle: How Welfarist Norms Escape In-Groups, Alexander D. Jakle Jul 2013

Expanding The Inner Circle: How Welfarist Norms Escape In-Groups, Alexander D. Jakle

Alexander D. Jakle

I explore the influence of social mechanisms by which welfarist norms come to be appropriate by those outside the social group for which they were developed, and how they lead to patterned deviance from the law. Drawing on literature from law and society, law and economics, political science, social theory, and other fields, I use original research from a qualitative study of amateur baseball players to analyze the interplay between norms, groups, and deviance. Relationships with agents is widespread, despite being against both NCAA Bylaws and most players economic incentives. To explain this seemingly irrational pattern of rule-breaking, I argue ...


The Lies We Tell Ourselves: Confidence, Self-Deception, And Their Effects On "Rationality" And Deviance, Alexander D. Jakle Jul 2013

The Lies We Tell Ourselves: Confidence, Self-Deception, And Their Effects On "Rationality" And Deviance, Alexander D. Jakle

Alexander D. Jakle

Law and economics suggests that we behave in ways that maximize our preferences, but what if we are deceived about what we want or how best to get it? This article explores how the psychology of self-deception can be marshaled to explain unexpected patterns of law-breaking and deviance. Using original research from a qualitative case study of amateur NCAA baseball players, I examine the ways in which self-deception leads us to systematically reinterpret and process information, fundamentally changing how we weigh the costs and benefits associated with breaking rules. Our preferences are inextricably interwoven with our identities, and we go ...


Mirror, Mirror On The Wall, Who Are You To Say Who Is Fairest Of Them All?, Ashley R. Brown Jul 2013

Mirror, Mirror On The Wall, Who Are You To Say Who Is Fairest Of Them All?, Ashley R. Brown

Ashley R Brown

No abstract provided.


Mirror, Mirror On The Wall, Who Are You To Say Who Is Fairest Of Them All?, Ashley R. Brown Jul 2013

Mirror, Mirror On The Wall, Who Are You To Say Who Is Fairest Of Them All?, Ashley R. Brown

Ashley R Brown

No abstract provided.


Substantial Similarity In Literary Infringement Cases: A Chart For Turbid Waters, Robert F. Helfing Jun 2013

Substantial Similarity In Literary Infringement Cases: A Chart For Turbid Waters, Robert F. Helfing

Robert F Helfing

INTRODUCTION

"We delve once again," wrote Ninth Circuit Judge Alex O. Kozinski, "into the turbid waters of the 'extrinsic test' for substantial similarity under the Copyright Act.”[1] The court had before it a claim that a popular television series infringed the copyrights in plaintiffs’ screenplays. Precedent regarding substantial similarity is particularly confused in cases involving literary infringement, resulting in virtually automatic rejection: In the past 35 years, courts in the Ninth Circuit has allowed only three such claims to avoid summary dismissal, none since 2002 when Judge Kozinski made his remark about turbid waters. Yet, in the absence of ...


Recognized Stature: Protecting Street Art As Cultural Property, Griffin M. Barnett May 2013

Recognized Stature: Protecting Street Art As Cultural Property, Griffin M. Barnett

Griffin M. Barnett

This Article discusses the current legal regimes in the United States implicated by works of "street art." The Article suggests an amendment to the Visual Artists Rights Act that would protect certain works of street art as "cultural property" - thereby promoting the arts and the preserving important works of art that might otherwise be at the mercy of property owners or others who do not share the interests of artists and the members of communities enhanced by works of street art.


Decoding And Resisting Culture: Reception Theory And Copyright Law, Meghan M. Lydon Ms. Apr 2013

Decoding And Resisting Culture: Reception Theory And Copyright Law, Meghan M. Lydon Ms.

Meghan M. Lydon Ms.

Though there has been much academic treatment of the author’s role in copyright law, few academic articles have been published about the reader’s role. Of those articles, only one has examined copyright law through the lens of reader response theory. In her article “Everything is Transformative: Fair Use and Reader Response,” 31 Colum. J.L. & Arts 445, Laura Heyman relied on English professor Stanley Fish’s famous reader response theory to argue that all works are transformative because readers naturally interpret texts from their own perspectives and that copyright law’s transformative use test should measure the use ...


Unringing The Bell: The Government Speech Doctrine And Publicly-Funded Art, John Barlow Apr 2013

Unringing The Bell: The Government Speech Doctrine And Publicly-Funded Art, John Barlow

John Barlow

No abstract provided.