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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Cleveland State University

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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Righting The Titled Scale: Expansion Of Artists' Rights In The United States, Colleen P. Battle Jan 1986

Righting The Titled Scale: Expansion Of Artists' Rights In The United States, Colleen P. Battle

Cleveland State Law Review

This Note focuses on the expansion of artists' rights in the United States, specifically the moral rights of paternity and integrity. It explores the history of judicial denial of moral rights and the attempt to gain protection through traditional causes of action. The Note then analyzes barriers to adoption of the moral rights doctrine, with emphasis on the challenge to traditional property concepts. The California Art Preservation Act of 1980 and the 1984 Artists' Authorship Act of New York are discussed and evaluated. This Note recommends adoption of the California statute as the model for future artists' rights legislation and ...


The Emergence Of Art Law, James J. Fishman Jan 1977

The Emergence Of Art Law, James J. Fishman

Cleveland State Law Review

It is the purpose of this Article to examine the practical and legal origins of the field of art law, and to highlight principal legal questions which are of significant concern to the visual artist.


The Film Collector, The Fbi, And The Copyright Act, Francis M. Nevins Jr. Jan 1977

The Film Collector, The Fbi, And The Copyright Act, Francis M. Nevins Jr.

Cleveland State Law Review

We are presently in the early middle stages of a media revolution which will reach its climax when films, in one form or another, will be found in people's homes and under consumers' control in much the same way as books and phonograph records. Although the availability of home videotaping equipment represents a giant step forward in the process, the revolution began long before the invention of the Betamax. For well over twenty years hobbyist film collectors, currently between 20,000 and 120,000 in number, have been purchasing sixteen and thirty-five millimeter prints of both copyrighted and public ...