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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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State and Local Government Law

Boston College Law Review

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Playing A Man Down: Professional Sports And Stadium Finance—How Leagues And Franchises Extract Favorable Terms From American Cities, Nicholas Baker Jan 2018

Playing A Man Down: Professional Sports And Stadium Finance—How Leagues And Franchises Extract Favorable Terms From American Cities, Nicholas Baker

Boston College Law Review

In an era of unprecedented profitability, expansion, and popularity of American professional sports leagues, it seems outrageous that cities and municipalities across the United States would continue to subsidize the funding of new stadiums for wealthy sports franchises. Yet despite the economic obstacles facing many of these cities and municipalities, the gratuitous public funding of stadiums across the United States persists. This reality stems from the extraordinary bargaining power that professional sports franchises maintain over the cities in which they are located. Indeed, threating to relocate a franchise brings forth a litany of cities that are ready and willing to ...


Jurisdictional Haze: Indiana And Washington’S Unconstitutional Extensions Of The Postmortem Right Of Publicity, Robert Rossi Jan 2016

Jurisdictional Haze: Indiana And Washington’S Unconstitutional Extensions Of The Postmortem Right Of Publicity, Robert Rossi

Boston College Law Review

Long after they die, cultural icons such as Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, and Jimi Hendrix continue to earn millions of dollars annually. Despite the tremendous amount of money earned by marketing the images of certain late celebrities, the laws conferring and governing the postmortem right of publicity are varied and often unpredictable. In most states, the right to profit from the image of a deceased person depends entirely upon the law of the jurisdiction in which the deceased was domiciled at the time of death. Certain state legislatures, however, have passed statutes conferring this right on persons domiciled outside of ...


Betting On State Equality: How The Expanded Equal Sovereignty Doctrine Applies To The Commerce Clause And Signals The Demise Of The Professional And Amateur Sports Protection Act, Michael Welsh May 2014

Betting On State Equality: How The Expanded Equal Sovereignty Doctrine Applies To The Commerce Clause And Signals The Demise Of The Professional And Amateur Sports Protection Act, Michael Welsh

Boston College Law Review

In recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court revived the long-dormant equal sovereignty doctrine, which states that the federal government cannot enact legislation that renders states unequal in power, dignity, and authority. Although the doctrine historically applied only in the context of states entering the Union, in the 2013 case Shelby County v. Holder, the Supreme Court broadened the doctrine’s scope, holding that the doctrine applied to all disparate treatment of states. As such, the revived equal sovereignty doctrine leaves federal statutes—such as the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (“PASPA”), which prohibits state-sanctioned casino sports gambling in ...