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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Comparative and Foreign Law

University of Washington School of Law

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

The Emergence Of Hollywood Ghosts On Korean Tvs: The Right Of Publicity From The Global Market Perspective, Hyung Doo Nam Jul 2010

The Emergence Of Hollywood Ghosts On Korean Tvs: The Right Of Publicity From The Global Market Perspective, Hyung Doo Nam

Washington International Law Journal

The Right of Publicity is both a cultural based property and a corresponding right that protects the entertainment industry in the worldwide market. Discussion of the Right of Publicity, as a preliminary matter, must separate the policy-based approach of the United States from the doctrinal approaches. In order for this discussion to be carried out, the author considers the Right of Publicity with two new approaches. First, it is the author’s view that the Right of Publicity must be understood in the context of the entertainment market, considering the role of each player and their relationship to each other ...


Hong Kong's Discriminatory Air Time: Family Viewing Hours And The Case Of Cho Man Kit V. Broadcasting Authority, Lauren E. Sancken Apr 2010

Hong Kong's Discriminatory Air Time: Family Viewing Hours And The Case Of Cho Man Kit V. Broadcasting Authority, Lauren E. Sancken

Washington International Law Journal

Hong Kong’s long standing commitment to media and press freedom came under question when the Broadcasting Authority issued a ruling against a television show about same-sex couples. In deciding Cho Man Kit v. Broadcasting Authority, the Court of First Instance affirmed that sexual orientation must be afforded freedom of expression in public broadcasting. However, the Court found that the Broadcasting Authority had lawfully ruled that the show be excluded from family viewing hours. Though the opinion was in many ways a legal victory for homosexuals in Hong Kong, this Comment argues that the family viewing hours ruling undermines the ...


Regulation On Sino-Foreign Cooperation In Making Television Programs, Litong Chen Jun 2005

Regulation On Sino-Foreign Cooperation In Making Television Programs, Litong Chen

Washington International Law Journal

The Chinese Government traditionally has believed that the voices of adversaries, whether foreign or domestic, should not be heard. The Preamble to the Chinese Constitution states that, "The Chinese people must fight against those forces and elements, both at home and abroad, that are hostile to China's socialist system and try to undermine it."' The beachhead which has been regarded as most critical for the Communist Party of China ("CPC") to defend is China's mass media—the CPC's mouthpiece for its ideological rhetoric. Conventionally, the best way to keep a beachhead is to repel the enemy from ...


Online Music Piracy: Can American Solutions Be Exported To The People's Republic Of China To Protect American Music?, Jolene Lau Marshall Jan 2005

Online Music Piracy: Can American Solutions Be Exported To The People's Republic Of China To Protect American Music?, Jolene Lau Marshall

Washington International Law Journal

Online music piracy is a major problem in the United States and a growing problem in the People's Republic of China ("PRC"). Despite awareness of the roots of the problem, the responses of the American government and recording industry have enjoyed only mixed success. The most effective ways of combating online music piracy have been the legal pursuit of individual copyright infringers and the emergence of fee-based download services. In light of the differences in social background, laws, enforcement structure, and cultural beliefs between the United States and the PRC, simply transplanting American responses to online music piracy to ...


From Mao To Yao: A New Game Plan For China In The Era Of Basketball Globalization, Dustin C. Lane Jan 2004

From Mao To Yao: A New Game Plan For China In The Era Of Basketball Globalization, Dustin C. Lane

Washington International Law Journal

Yao Ming, a Chinese basketball superstar and the top pick in the 2002 NBA draft, became just the third player from China to play professionally in the United States. His departure, however, was met with reluctance by the Chinese basketball bureaucracy and came at a high price: he had to agree to remit more than half of his salary to Chinese government agencies and return to play for the Chinese National Team in certain competitions. While Yao's release demonstrates willingness by the Chinese government to participate in an increasingly globalized sports world, it also highlights the growing pains of ...


Building The Korean Film Industry's Competitiveness: Abolish The Screen Quota And Subsidize The Film Industry, Carolyn Hyun-Kyung Kim May 2000

Building The Korean Film Industry's Competitiveness: Abolish The Screen Quota And Subsidize The Film Industry, Carolyn Hyun-Kyung Kim

Washington International Law Journal

Under Korean law, local theaters in Korea must show Korean films for at least 146 days each year. In 1998, this screen quota became the subject of heated debate between the United States and the Korean film industry when the United States demanded that Korea abolish it. The United States believes the quota violates free trade principles, while the Korean film industry argues that cultural products such as films cannot be equated with other commercial commodities. Cultural identities must be protected because a diversified global culture benefits all. Domestic film industries should be protected because films constitute a vehicle for ...


Changing The "Fourth Channels": Taiwan Tunes In To A New Cable Television Law, Sophia R. Byrd Jul 1996

Changing The "Fourth Channels": Taiwan Tunes In To A New Cable Television Law, Sophia R. Byrd

Washington International Law Journal

Threatened with potentially massive trade sanctions by the United States, Taiwan enacted the Cable Television Law in 1993 to regulate the so-called "Fourth Channels," hundreds of private cable operations that transmitted programming pirated from the United States and other sources. This Comment identifies the roots of the Fourth Channels and examines the U.S. and Taiwanese forces that gave rise to the cable law. The Comment analyzes major provisions of the law and explores the law's effects on both U.S. and Taiwanese interests.