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Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

2012

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Poor Mothers And Lonely Single Males: The ‘Essentially’ Excluded Women And Men Of Australia, Roger Patulny, Melissa Wong Jan 2012

Poor Mothers And Lonely Single Males: The ‘Essentially’ Excluded Women And Men Of Australia, Roger Patulny, Melissa Wong

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

It is unclear how much gendered social exclusion and disconnection reflects a problem or a preference. Women may prefer market-disengagement despite the risk of exclusion from ‘normal’ social activities through financial incapacity, and men may prefer marketengagement despite the risk of disconnection from informal social networks. This article examines these issues amongst Australian men and women. It finds women, particularly single and low-income mothers, are more socially excluded, and men, particularly single middle-aged men, are the most socially disconnected, after preferences. Future policy should be cognisant of contact preferences, intra-household support dynamics, long work hours and prevailing gender norms.


"What's A Nice Girl Like You Doing With A Nobel Prize?" Elizabeth Blackburn, "Australia's First Women Nobel Laureate And Women's Scientific Leadership, Jane L. Carey Jan 2012

"What's A Nice Girl Like You Doing With A Nobel Prize?" Elizabeth Blackburn, "Australia's First Women Nobel Laureate And Women's Scientific Leadership, Jane L. Carey

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In 2009 Elizabeth Blackburn (along with two of her American colleagues) won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, confirming her position as a global scientific leader. She was immediately celebrated as Australia’s first woman Nobel laureate. However, although 2009 was a ‘bumper’ year for women Nobel laureates, with five winners in total, the media coverage soon became highly negative and discouraging. Much discussion focused not on Blackburn’s scientific work but on her gender – the difficulties it was assumed she must have faced individually as a woman scientist, and her wider leadership role in encouraging and supporting other ...