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The Vexations Of Aging From The Imagination (A Lot) And Life (A Little) Of Bill Miller, James J. White Jan 2013

The Vexations Of Aging From The Imagination (A Lot) And Life (A Little) Of Bill Miller, James J. White

Reviews

Bill Miller has done something quite uncommon, possibly singular: he has become a prominent law professor by writing books that have nothing to do with the law. His books do not even have the remote relation to law that books by philosophers or historians can claim. Having studied medieval history before law school and achieved law school tenure by teetering on the edge of law in his work on Icelandic sagas, Miller jumped the fence completely in his books The Mystery of Courage, The Anatomy of Disgust, and Faking It. He has never returned. Presumably, this Review earned a place ...


Review Of Digest Of Procedural Statutes And Court Rules: Pleading, Joinder And Judgment Record, By E. G. Brown, John W. Reed Jan 1955

Review Of Digest Of Procedural Statutes And Court Rules: Pleading, Joinder And Judgment Record, By E. G. Brown, John W. Reed

Reviews

This is no bedside reader. One is, I suppose, adequately warned by the title to expect something less agreeable than a collection of short stories from the New Yorker. Digests are not made to be read seriatim. Lawyers, familiar with case digests, know better than to expect anything very stimulating to develop from an evening spent in random reading of, say, volume 22 (Mayhem to Motions) of the Third Decennial Digest. One is reminded of the man who said that the dictionary would be interesting reading if it didn't change the subject so often. Well, a digest doesn't ...


Review Of Jurisprudence: Men And Ideas Of The Law, By E. W. Patterson, John W. Reed Jan 1954

Review Of Jurisprudence: Men And Ideas Of The Law, By E. W. Patterson, John W. Reed

Reviews

Jurisprudence: Men and Ideas of the Law was written as a textbook for students enrolled in Columbia's jurisprudence course. It appeared first inmimeograph in 1940, and has gone through three revisions before emerging in its present printed form. Thirteen years is not a record incubation period, but it typifies the care and thoroughness with which Professor Patterson works and with which he has prepared the present volume. Each sentence, each paragraph, each section is, to me, a clear statement of his meaning and serves his purpose well.