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Politics

Melissa K. Scanlan

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Marginalized Monitoring: Adaptively Managing Urban Stormwater, Melissa K. Scanlan, Stephanie Tai Sep 2012

Marginalized Monitoring: Adaptively Managing Urban Stormwater, Melissa K. Scanlan, Stephanie Tai

Melissa K. Scanlan

Adaptive management is a theory that encourages environmental managers to engage in a continual learning process and adapt their management choices based on learning about new scientific developments. One such area of scientific development relevant to water management is bacterial genetics, which now allow scientists to identify when human sewage is getting into places it should not be. Source-specific bacterial testing in a variety of cities across the United States indicates there is human sewage in urban stormwater pipes. These pipes are designed to carry runoff from city streets and lots, and they send untreated water directly into rivers, streams ...


Protecting The Public Trust And Human Rights In The Great Lakes, Melissa K. Scanlan Jan 2006

Protecting The Public Trust And Human Rights In The Great Lakes, Melissa K. Scanlan

Melissa K. Scanlan

No abstract provided.


Realizing The Promise Of The Great Lakes Compact: A Policy Analysis For State Implementation, Melissa K. Scanlan, Jodi H. Sinykin, James Krohelski Jan 2006

Realizing The Promise Of The Great Lakes Compact: A Policy Analysis For State Implementation, Melissa K. Scanlan, Jodi H. Sinykin, James Krohelski

Melissa K. Scanlan

No abstract provided.


The Evolution Of The Public Trust Doctrine And The Degradation Of Trust Re- Sources: Courts, Trustees And Political Power In Wisconsin, Melissa K. Scanlan Jan 2000

The Evolution Of The Public Trust Doctrine And The Degradation Of Trust Re- Sources: Courts, Trustees And Political Power In Wisconsin, Melissa K. Scanlan

Melissa K. Scanlan

The public trust doctrine is rooted in ancient Roman law and the Wisconsin Constitution. Ancient Roman jurists be- lieved that the natural law concept that the waters are common to all was not subject to the changing whims of legis- latures. Similarly, modern theorists assert that a constitutionally-based doctrine will be more insulated from politics. This Comment demonstrates the limits of these theories. The trust doctrine is not immutable. Based on interviews with the trustees of Wisconsin's water resources, this Comment uncovers the constraints on the trustees. It shows that trust resources are at risk due to politically-motivated decisions ...