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Full-Text Articles in Law

Selection Biases, Mark A. Graber, Sanford Levinson Dec 2012

Selection Biases, Mark A. Graber, Sanford Levinson

Mark Graber

No abstract provided.


Circumspect Agatis Revisted, David K. Millon Dec 2012

Circumspect Agatis Revisted, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


Objectivity And Democracy, David K. Millon Dec 2012

Objectivity And Democracy, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

As a response to skepticism about the possibility of objectivity in legal decisionmaking conventionalism posits the shared understandings of the legal profession (about method and the implications of doctrine) as the source of constraint in legal interpretation. In this Article, Professor Millon argues that conventionalism's proponents have failed to offer an adequate account of interpretive constraint, but that conventionalism properly understood can nevertheless provide a useful perspective on the possibility of objectivity in legal interpretation. This account locates interpretive constraint in the practices of the legal profession as a whole, acting as an "interpretive community" or constituting a distinctive ...


Book Review, (Reviewing Norman Doe, Fundamental Authority In Late Medieval English Law (1990)), David K. Millon Dec 2012

Book Review, (Reviewing Norman Doe, Fundamental Authority In Late Medieval English Law (1990)), David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


The First Antistrust Statute, David K. Millon Dec 2012

The First Antistrust Statute, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


Roger Groot, Legal Historian, David K. Millon Nov 2012

Roger Groot, Legal Historian, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

No abstract provided.


Faith In The Republic: A Frances Lewis Law Center Conversation, Ann Maclean Massie, David K. Millon Nov 2012

Faith In The Republic: A Frances Lewis Law Center Conversation, Ann Maclean Massie, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


How Bad Were The Official Records Of The Federal Convention?, Mary Sarah Bilder Oct 2012

How Bad Were The Official Records Of The Federal Convention?, Mary Sarah Bilder

Mary Sarah Bilder

The official records of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 have been neglected and dismissed by scholars for the last century, largely to due to Max Farrand’s criticisms of both the records and the man responsible for keeping them - Secretary of the Convention William Jackson. This Article disagrees with Farrand’s conclusion that the Convention records were bad, and aims to resurrect the records and Jackson’s reputation. The Article suggests that the endurance of Farrand’s critique arises in part from misinterpretations of certain procedural components of the Convention and failure to appreciate the significance of others, understandable considering ...


Battle For The Disclosure Tort: Scholars’ Untold Story, Jared A. Wilkerson Aug 2012

Battle For The Disclosure Tort: Scholars’ Untold Story, Jared A. Wilkerson

Jared A. Wilkerson

Legal scholars guided the creation and development of privacy torts, including what would become known as the disclosure tort, for about seventy-five years (1890–1965), a period in which most states came to recognize a common law or statutory right to privacy. Since then, scholarly attempts to curb or modify the tort have yielded little. This article—beginning with the formalism-realism debate won by Brandeis, Pound, and Prosser and ending with modern experts like Chemerinsky, Posner, and Solove—shows that notwithstanding enormous efforts by some of America’s most respected contemporary academics, would-be reformers of the disclosure tort have not ...


Brazil Begins To Investigate Its Dark Past, But Is It Too Little Too Late?, Thomas Thompson-Flores Aug 2012

Brazil Begins To Investigate Its Dark Past, But Is It Too Little Too Late?, Thomas Thompson-Flores

Thomas L Thompson-Flores

This article analyzes the history of Brazil, the current legal battle over its Amnesty Law, and finally compares the transitional justice process chosen in Brazil versus other South American countries. An historical background of Brazil from 1964 to the present is given to illustrate the reasons behind the methods chosen by Brazil to implement transitional justice in the country. This historical summary begins with the military’s rise to power in 1964; then discusses the harsh policies implemented by the military in order to maintain its power; the process of democratic transition; and finally the steps taken by Brazil in ...


Livingstone And The Law: Africa’S Greatest Explorer And The Abolition Of The Slave Trade, Jay Milbrandt Aug 2012

Livingstone And The Law: Africa’S Greatest Explorer And The Abolition Of The Slave Trade, Jay Milbrandt

Jay Milbrandt

Few historical events have had such tragic, widespread, and lingering consequences as the exportation of slaves from Africa. While the abolition of western Africa’s transatlantic slave trade is well documented, the events and legal framework that led to the abolition of the slave trade in East Africa remain practically untold. There, an unlikely hero championed abolition: Missionary and explorer Dr. David Livingstone. His method: an ambitious publicity stunt to dramatically change international law.

This article will illustrate how explorer David Livingstone’s advocacy profoundly affected the legal landscape to restrict the slave trade in East Africa, and eventually dealt ...


The Role Of Religion In A Catholic Law School: A Century Of Experience At Loyola University Chicago, Thomas M. Haney Aug 2012

The Role Of Religion In A Catholic Law School: A Century Of Experience At Loyola University Chicago, Thomas M. Haney

Thomas M. Haney

The purpose of this article is to examine the record of a Catholic law school, the School of Law of Loyola University Chicago, which a few years ago celebrated its centennial. This is a detailed study of how the Catholic identity of Loyola Chicago’s law school has manifested itself over the past century, during several distinct eras. The article concludes that the criteria chosen to identify a truly Catholic law school will determine the result of whether any particular law school is indeed Catholic, and that different scholars and commentators will choose different criteria, therefore arriving at different conclusions ...


Scalia & Garner's Reading Law: A Civil Law For The Age Of Statutes?, James R. Maxeiner Aug 2012

Scalia & Garner's Reading Law: A Civil Law For The Age Of Statutes?, James R. Maxeiner

James R Maxeiner

In Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and American legal lexicographer Bryan A. Garner challenge Americans to start over in dealing with statutes in the Age of Statutes. They propose “textualism,” i.e., “that the words of a governing text are of paramount concern, and what they convey in their context is what the text means.” Textualism is to remedy American lack of “a generally agreed-on approach to the interpretation of legal texts.” That deficiency makes American law unpredictable, unequal, undemocratic and political. In the book’s Foreword Chief Judge Frank Easterbrook ...


Self-Reflection Within The Academy: The Absence Of Women In Constitutional Jurisprudence, Karin M. Mika Jul 2012

Self-Reflection Within The Academy: The Absence Of Women In Constitutional Jurisprudence, Karin M. Mika

Karin Mika

This article will suggest that legal education has failed to represent the significant contributions of women in our American legal heritage within its curriculum. It urges that an acknowledgment of the feminine contribution must now be included within the curriculum of law schools in such a way that the contribution is incorporated within traditional substantive courses rather than select courses dealing with primarily "women's issues." Focusing on the Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries, this article highlights the achievements and legal battles of women which were integral to the overall development of legal theory in our country. It discusses some ...


The Thirteenth Amendment Enforcement Authority, Alexander Tsesis Jul 2012

The Thirteenth Amendment Enforcement Authority, Alexander Tsesis

Alexander Tsesis

In the paper, I argue that the Thirteenth Amendment's enforcement clause grants Congress the power to enact statutes to protect liberty. I trace the American concept of liberty, using archival research, through the writings of the revolutionary framers and abolitionists. I believe that the Thirty-Eighth Congress, 1864-1865, intended the Thirteenth Amendment to provide the power to enforce the Declaration of Independence's and Preamble's guarantees of equal liberty. The paper also places the enforcement clause of the Thirteenth Amendment into the contemporary setting of recent decisions on the Fourteenth Amendment and the Commerce Clause.


Bush V. Gore: The Worst (Or At Least Second-To-The-Worst) Supreme Court Decision Ever, Mark S. Brodin May 2012

Bush V. Gore: The Worst (Or At Least Second-To-The-Worst) Supreme Court Decision Ever, Mark S. Brodin

Mark S. Brodin

In the stiff competition for worst Supreme Court decision ever, two candidates stand heads above the others for the simple reason that they precipitated actual fighting wars in their times. By holding that slaves, as mere chattels, could not sue in court and could never be American citizens, and further invalidating the Missouri Compromise, which had prohibited slavery in new territories, Dred Scott v. Sanford charted the course to secession and Civil War four years later. By disenfranchising Florida voters and thereby appointing popular-vote loser George W. Bush as President, Bush v. Gore set in motion events which would lead ...


The Oregon And California Railroad Grant Lands’ Sordid Past, Contentious Present, And Uncertain Future: A Century Of Conflict, Michael Blumm Apr 2012

The Oregon And California Railroad Grant Lands’ Sordid Past, Contentious Present, And Uncertain Future: A Century Of Conflict, Michael Blumm

Michael Blumm

This article examines the long, contentious history of the Oregon & California Land Grant that produced federal forest lands now managed by the Bureau of Land Management (“O&C lands”), including an analysis of how these lands re-vested to the federal government following decades of corruption and scandal, and the resulting congressional effort that created a management structure supporting local county governments through overharvesting the lands for a half-century. The article proceeds to trace the fate of O&C lands through the “spotted owl wars” of the 1990s, the ensuing Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP), the timber salvage rider of 1995, and ...


Federalist Or Friends Of Adams: The Marshall Court And Party Politics, Mark A. Graber Apr 2012

Federalist Or Friends Of Adams: The Marshall Court And Party Politics, Mark A. Graber

Mark Graber

No abstract provided.


Justice John Marshall Harlan I, Richard Maloy Mar 2012

Justice John Marshall Harlan I, Richard Maloy

Richard Maloy

No abstract provided.


Contractualism In The Law Of Treaties, Omar Dajani Mar 2012

Contractualism In The Law Of Treaties, Omar Dajani

Omar M Dajani

The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, provides that “[a] treaty is void” if it has been “procured by the threat or use of force in violation of the principles embodied in the Charter of the United Nations” or if it “conflicts with a peremptory norm of general international law” – i.e., jus cogens. In the more than three decades since the Vienna Convention entered into force, however, neither of these provisions has been successfully invoked even once to challenge the validity of a treaty. In this Article, I undertake to explain why that is so – and why it ...


Outing-- And Ousting-- The "Hidden" Hyde: Toward Repeal And Replacement Of The Hyde Amendment, Rebecca Stewart Feb 2012

Outing-- And Ousting-- The "Hidden" Hyde: Toward Repeal And Replacement Of The Hyde Amendment, Rebecca Stewart

Rebecca K Stewart

Poorly crafted statutes have always created interpretive quandaries for judges and litigants, and these problems naturally tend to be exacerbated when substantive legislation is passed as a result of less than substantive legislative processes, such as through limitations riders to appropriations bills. However, these issues become vastly more troublesome when Congress intentionally subverts measures intended to restrain such processes. This Article examines the passage of one such rider, commonly known as the Hyde Amendment, exploring its origins and curious subtextual codification, and analyzing its life in the federal courts over more than a dozen years.

The Article argues that early ...


Dormancy Versus Innovation: A Next Generation Dormant Commerce Clause, Sam Kalen Feb 2012

Dormancy Versus Innovation: A Next Generation Dormant Commerce Clause, Sam Kalen

Sam Kalen Mr.

The vitality of the dormant commerce clause is becoming increasingly suspect. Modern academic commentary questions the Supreme Court’s rationale for this negative aspect of the Commerce Clause. Yet the emphasis of the scholarship overlooks how our society has changed dramatically since the Court developed its present analysis, and it is the analysis perhaps more than the rationale that is bankrupt. The analysis the Court employs under the clause is cabining innovate state and local programs, such as responses to climate change. The article, therefore, traces the dynamic nature of the dormant commerce clause, how its modern formulation ignores societal ...


The Emerging Restrictions Of Sovereign Immunity: Premptory Norms Of International Law, The Un Charter, And The Application Of Modern Communications Theory, Winston P. Nagan Feb 2012

The Emerging Restrictions Of Sovereign Immunity: Premptory Norms Of International Law, The Un Charter, And The Application Of Modern Communications Theory, Winston P. Nagan

Winston P Nagan

The article is titled The Emerging Restrictions on Sovereign Immunity: Peremptory Norms of International Law, the UN Charter, and the Application of Modern Communications Theory. The article provides a fresh re-examination of the conceptual foundations of the sovereign immunity doctrine in the light of the changing character of sovereignty itself. This is done in the context of the changing expectations in international law generated by the UN Charter, and the development of human rights and humanitarian law. The article applies the innovative communications theories generated by the New Haven School to provide a more realistic and relevant approach to the ...


The Big Banks: Background, Deregulation, Financial Innovation And Too Big To Fail, Charles W. Murdock Feb 2012

The Big Banks: Background, Deregulation, Financial Innovation And Too Big To Fail, Charles W. Murdock

Charles W. Murdock

Summary: The Big Banks: Background, Deregulation, Financial Innovation and Too Big to Fail

The U.S. economy is still reeling from the financial crisis that exploded in the fall of 2008. This article asserts that the big banks were major culprits in causing the crisis, by funding the non-bank lenders that created the toxic mortgages which the big banks securitized and sold to unwary investors. Paradoxically, banks which were then too big to fail are even larger today.

The article briefly reviews the history of banking from the Founding Fathers to the deregulatory mindset that has been present since 1980 ...


Classical Contract Law, Past And Present, Anat Rosenberg Feb 2012

Classical Contract Law, Past And Present, Anat Rosenberg

Anat Rosenberg

This paper synthesizes and refocuses a wide range of histories of nineteenth-century contract law. It uncovers an inadvertent consensus among historians: despite significant controversies engaging rival historical schools of contract law, it is almost universally agreed that nineteenth-century law embodied an elaborate version of individualism; that the alternatives to its individualism were status and collectivism — but they functioned as external critiques and so left contract's conceptual link with individualism intact; and that the individualism grounded in contract law was in keeping with broad cultural mores. The consensus effectively entrenches a questionable historical artifact: the idea of a single meaning ...


Towards Classical Legal Positivism, Dan Priel Feb 2012

Towards Classical Legal Positivism, Dan Priel

Dan Priel

Open almost any textbook on jurisprudence and you will find it beginning with a discussion of natural law and legal positivism. Almost without exception one finds in them two claims. First, what sets legal positivism and natural law apart is a difference on the conceptual question of the relationship between law and morality. Natural lawyers believe that law or legality are necessarily connected to morality, whereas legal positivists deny that. The second claim tells a story about the historical development of legal positivism: according to the familiar story the classical legal positivists like Thomas Hobbes and Jeremy Bentham subscribed to ...


The Age Of Marital Capacity: Reconsidering Civil Recognition Of Adolescent Marriage, Vivian E. Hamilton Feb 2012

The Age Of Marital Capacity: Reconsidering Civil Recognition Of Adolescent Marriage, Vivian E. Hamilton

Vivian E. Hamilton

Age at marriage has for decades been the strongest and most unequivocal predictor of marital failure. The likelihood of divorce nears 80 percent for those who marry in mid-adolescence, then drops steadily. Delaying marriage until the mid-twenties reduces one’s likelihood of divorce to 30 percent. Women who marry at age twenty-one or younger, moreover—and one in ten U.S. women do—experience worse mental and physical health, attain less education, and earn lower wages than those who marry later. Post-divorce, they and their children tend to endure even greater economic deprivation and instability than do never-married mothers, who ...


The Failure And Promise Of Equity In Domestic Abuse Cases, Jeffrey Baker Feb 2012

The Failure And Promise Of Equity In Domestic Abuse Cases, Jeffrey Baker

Jeffrey R Baker

In a generation, American law has experienced dramatic reforms in response to domestic abuse, including innovative criminal law enforcement schemes, liberalized divorce standards and civil protection orders. Feminist activism prompted and drove these reforms and related cultural understanding of domestic abuse, and they have yielded more effective legal options for victims of domestic violence. Virtually all of these reforms built upon existing structures to afford specific process and remedies to victims of domestic abuse, but why were innovations necessary if existing legal structures could have intervened on their own extant authority? Customary, common law equity might have intervened effectively to ...


The Evolution Of The Supreme Court’S Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence: Protecting Fraud At The Expense Of Investors, Charles W. Murdock Feb 2012

The Evolution Of The Supreme Court’S Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence: Protecting Fraud At The Expense Of Investors, Charles W. Murdock

Charles W. Murdock

Summary: The Evolution of the Supreme Court’s Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence:

Protecting Fraud at the Expense of Investors

This article traces the evolution of Supreme Court jurisprudence over the past forty years through the prism of Rule 10b-5. It uses four “trilogies” to develop this evolution. At the start of the 1970s, the liberal trend characterized by the Warren Court still prevailed. An implied private cause of action was still in favor and litigators were viewed as private attorneys general, enforcing the securities laws to further the policy of protecting investors.

The expansion of Rule 10b-5 was slowed and more ...


Appeals To The Privy Council Before American Independence: An Annotated Digital Catalogue, Sharon Hamby O'Connor, Mary Sarah Bilder Feb 2012

Appeals To The Privy Council Before American Independence: An Annotated Digital Catalogue, Sharon Hamby O'Connor, Mary Sarah Bilder

Mary Sarah Bilder

Between the later seventeenth century and American independence, appeals from colonial high courts were taken to the Privy Council in England. These appeals are the precursors of today’s appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court. Their legal and policy issues can be reconstructed from the outcome of the appeals, the briefs of crown law officers, related Privy Council documents, and handwritten notations on these materials. This article describes Appeals to the Privy Council Before American Independence, an annotated digital catalogue of appeals from the thirteen colonies with links and digital images providing access to this material, now compiled from ...