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Legal History

2012

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Articles 1 - 30 of 202

Full-Text Articles in Law

Selection Biases, Mark A. Graber, Sanford Levinson Dec 2012

Selection Biases, Mark A. Graber, Sanford Levinson

Mark Graber

No abstract provided.


American Constitutionalism: Volume Ii: Rights & Liberties, Howard Gillman, Mark Graber, Keith Whittington Dec 2012

American Constitutionalism: Volume Ii: Rights & Liberties, Howard Gillman, Mark Graber, Keith Whittington

Mark Graber

Constitutionalism in the United States is not determined solely by decisions made by the Supreme Court. Moving beyond traditional casebooks, renowned scholars Howard Gillman, Mark A. Graber, and Keith E. Whittington take a refreshingly innovative approach in American Constitutionalism. Organized according to the standard two-semester sequence--in which Volume I covers Structures of Government and Volume II covers Rights and Liberties--this text is unique in that it presents the material in a historical organization within each volume, as opposed to the typical issues-based organization.


Dred Scott, John San(D)Ford, And The Case For Collusion, David T. Hardy Dec 2012

Dred Scott, John San(D)Ford, And The Case For Collusion, David T. Hardy

David T. Hardy

Dred Scott v. John F. A. Sandford was one of the most critical cases in Supreme Court history, “an astonisher,” as Lincoln phrased it. In the “Opinion of the Court,” which was not actually the opinion of the Court (parts of it mustered only three votes), Chief Justice Taney stretched to insulate slavery in every way manageable. The ruling became instead an application of the “law of unintended consequences.” It led to the rise of Abraham Lincoln (who devoted much of his “House Undivided” speech to it), the destruction of Stephen Douglas’ presidential campaign (since it held his core position ...


Circumspect Agatis Revisted, David K. Millon Dec 2012

Circumspect Agatis Revisted, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


Objectivity And Democracy, David K. Millon Dec 2012

Objectivity And Democracy, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

As a response to skepticism about the possibility of objectivity in legal decisionmaking conventionalism posits the shared understandings of the legal profession (about method and the implications of doctrine) as the source of constraint in legal interpretation. In this Article, Professor Millon argues that conventionalism's proponents have failed to offer an adequate account of interpretive constraint, but that conventionalism properly understood can nevertheless provide a useful perspective on the possibility of objectivity in legal interpretation. This account locates interpretive constraint in the practices of the legal profession as a whole, acting as an "interpretive community" or constituting a distinctive ...


Book Review, (Reviewing Norman Doe, Fundamental Authority In Late Medieval English Law (1990)), David K. Millon Dec 2012

Book Review, (Reviewing Norman Doe, Fundamental Authority In Late Medieval English Law (1990)), David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


The First Antistrust Statute, David K. Millon Dec 2012

The First Antistrust Statute, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


Roger Groot, Legal Historian, David K. Millon Nov 2012

Roger Groot, Legal Historian, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

No abstract provided.


Faith In The Republic: A Frances Lewis Law Center Conversation, Ann Maclean Massie, David K. Millon Nov 2012

Faith In The Republic: A Frances Lewis Law Center Conversation, Ann Maclean Massie, David K. Millon

David K. Millon

None available.


More Than Formulaic, Arthur Mitchell Fraas Oct 2012

More Than Formulaic, Arthur Mitchell Fraas

Unique at Penn

Contextual essay about an 18th-century American legal formulary created by Jared Ingersoll.


How Bad Were The Official Records Of The Federal Convention?, Mary Sarah Bilder Oct 2012

How Bad Were The Official Records Of The Federal Convention?, Mary Sarah Bilder

Mary Sarah Bilder

The official records of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 have been neglected and dismissed by scholars for the last century, largely to due to Max Farrand’s criticisms of both the records and the man responsible for keeping them - Secretary of the Convention William Jackson. This Article disagrees with Farrand’s conclusion that the Convention records were bad, and aims to resurrect the records and Jackson’s reputation. The Article suggests that the endurance of Farrand’s critique arises in part from misinterpretations of certain procedural components of the Convention and failure to appreciate the significance of others, understandable considering ...


Judicial Review And Deliberative Politics. A Tension In Need Of Analysis., Donald E. Bello Hutt Oct 2012

Judicial Review And Deliberative Politics. A Tension In Need Of Analysis., Donald E. Bello Hutt

Donald E. Bello Hutt

Champions of judicial review of legislation have defended this institution even before John Marshall decided Marbury v. Madison in 1803. Nevertheless, those defenses have to face with several difficulties, both practical and abstract. The aim of this paper is to analyze those difficulties and the context in which the defenses have been successful. We shall discuss the origins of judicial review in the work of James Iredell, Alexander Hamilton and John Marshall in order to introduce not only the first defenses of judicial review, but to fix the political context and dominant constitutional philosophy at their time: departmentalism and popular ...


Confucian Constitutionalism In Traditional Vietnam, Son Ngoc Bui Oct 2012

Confucian Constitutionalism In Traditional Vietnam, Son Ngoc Bui

Son Ngoc Bui

This paper examines the practice of Confucian constitutionalism in traditional Vietnam with the case of the early Nguyễn dynasty- the last dynasty in the country. It demonstrates that following the Confucian concept of minben (people as base), the imperial ruler actually practiced governmental responsibility for the people. The practice of the imperial power was constricted by a “Confucian constitution” whose various sources consisted of four components, namely political norms in the Confucian classics, the models of ancient kings, the ancestral institutions, and the institutions of the precedent dynasties. As the institutionalization of “scholastic constitutionalism”, there were a number of institutions ...


Efficiency Themes In Tort Law From Antiquity, M Stuart Madden Oct 2012

Efficiency Themes In Tort Law From Antiquity, M Stuart Madden

M Stuart Madden

Hellenic philosophers assessed the goals of society as: (1) the protection of persons and property from wrongful harm; (2) protection of the individual’s means of survival and prosperity; (3) discouragement of self-aggrandizement to the detriment of others; and (4) elevation of individual knowledge that would carry forward and perfect such principles. Roman law was replete with proscriptions against forced taking and unjust enrichment, and included rules for ex ante contract-based resolution of potential disagreement. Customary law perpetuated these efficient economic tenets within the Western World and beyond. The common law, in turn, has nurtured many of the same ends ...


Property And Republicanism In The Northwest Ordinance, Matthew J. Festa Sep 2012

Property And Republicanism In The Northwest Ordinance, Matthew J. Festa

Matthew J. Festa

This Article shows that individual property rights held a central place in the republican ideology of the founding era by examining the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. Between the two predominant strains of founding-era political ideology—liberalism and republicanism—the conventional view holds that individual property rights were central to Lockean liberalism, but not to the republican political tradition, where property is thought to have played more of a communitarian role as part of promoting civic virtue and the common good. Republicanism has been invoked in modern debates, and its emphases are present in current ideas such as the important new ...


Janus Capital Group, Inc. V. First Derivative Traders: The Culmination Of The Supreme Court’S Reactionary Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence Which Protects Fraud At The Expense Of Investors, Charles W. Murdock Sep 2012

Janus Capital Group, Inc. V. First Derivative Traders: The Culmination Of The Supreme Court’S Reactionary Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence Which Protects Fraud At The Expense Of Investors, Charles W. Murdock

Charles W. Murdock

Summary: Janus Capital Group, Inc. v. First Derivative Traders: The Culmination of the Supreme Court’s Reactionary Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence Which Protects Fraud at the Expense of Investors

“Political” decisions such as Citizens United and National Federation of Independent Business (“Obamacare”) reflect the reactionary bent of several Supreme Court justices. But this reactionary trend is discernible in other areas as well. With regard to Rule 10b-5, the Court has handed down a series of decisions that could be grouped into four trilogies. The article examines the trend over the past 40 years which has become increasingly conservative and finally reactionary ...


The Phantom Fleet Of Porto Principe: Piracy And Admiralty Jurisdiction In The Atlantic Colonies, 1666-1698, Douglas R. Burgess Dr. Sep 2012

The Phantom Fleet Of Porto Principe: Piracy And Admiralty Jurisdiction In The Atlantic Colonies, 1666-1698, Douglas R. Burgess Dr.

Douglas R Burgess Dr.

No abstract provided.


Janus Capital Group, Inc. V. First Derivative Traders: The Culmination Of The Supreme Court’S Reactionary Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence Which Protects Fraud At The Expense Of Investors, Charles W. Murdock Sep 2012

Janus Capital Group, Inc. V. First Derivative Traders: The Culmination Of The Supreme Court’S Reactionary Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence Which Protects Fraud At The Expense Of Investors, Charles W. Murdock

Charles W. Murdock

Summary: Janus Capital Group, Inc. v. First Derivative Traders: The Culmination of the Supreme Court’s Reactionary Rule 10b-5 Jurisprudence Which Protects Fraud at the Expense of Investors

“Political” decisions such as Citizens United and National Federation of Independent Business (“Obamacare”) reflect the reactionary bent of several Supreme Court justices. But this reactionary trend is discernible in other areas as well. With regard to Rule 10b-5, the Court has handed down a series of decisions that could be grouped into four trilogies. The article examines the trend over the past 40 years which has become increasingly conservative and finally reactionary ...


Roger Nash Baldwin And The American Civil Liberties Union, Mathias Alfred Jaren Sep 2012

Roger Nash Baldwin And The American Civil Liberties Union, Mathias Alfred Jaren

Mathias Alfred Jaren

The thesis for this essay is that social work, acting for the benefit and welfare of others, can be accomplished effectively by non-lawyers employing an agenda of political and legal interventions. Legal interventions even as uncomplicated as filing an amicus curiae brief for some unknown defendant being prosecuted for an offense against his government can have significant and important long term implications. This thesis is examined in the context of a life devoted to civil liberties - The Life and times of Roger Nash Baldwin.


The Role Of Religion In A Catholic Law School: A Century Of Experience At Loyola University Chicago, Thomas M. Haney Sep 2012

The Role Of Religion In A Catholic Law School: A Century Of Experience At Loyola University Chicago, Thomas M. Haney

Thomas M. Haney

The purpose of this article is to examine the record of a Catholic law school, the School of Law of Loyola University Chicago, which a few years ago celebrated its centennial. This is a detailed study of how the Catholic identity of Loyola Chicago’s law school has manifested itself over the past century, during several distinct eras. The article concludes that the criteria chosen to identify a truly Catholic law school will determine the result of whether any particular law school is indeed Catholic, and that different scholars and commentators will choose different criteria, therefore arriving at different conclusions ...


The Haunting Of Abigail Fisher: Race, Affirmative Action, And The Ghosts Of Legal History, Hilary A. Leewong Sep 2012

The Haunting Of Abigail Fisher: Race, Affirmative Action, And The Ghosts Of Legal History, Hilary A. Leewong

Hilary A Leewong

What is race in 2012, and why does it matter?

At the end of the current term, the Supreme Court will decide Fisher v. University of Texas. In doing so, the Court revisits the role of affirmative action and the meaning of race much sooner than constitutional law scholars, and likely the average college applicant, expected it would.

The Court’s last definitive take on the subject was conveyed by Justice O’Connor in 2003’s Grutter v. Bollinger. Justice O’Connor’s opinion conveyed disappointment that race-based admissions in higher education was still necessary this long after Brown v ...


Proxy Sovereignty And The Problem Of Immunity, Sarah L. Brinton Sep 2012

Proxy Sovereignty And The Problem Of Immunity, Sarah L. Brinton

Sarah L Brinton

The U.S. Constitution creates a three-branch federal government that acts on behalf of the sovereign people. Each constitutional branch—Congress, the executive, and the judiciary—is constrained to exercise only the powers and act only in the roles assigned it by the sovereign people via the Constitution. Despite this tripartite, proxy-sovereign nature of the U.S. national government, current federal sovereign immunity jurisprudence affords Congress the exclusive right to act as sovereign to waive immunity. This Article argues that the Constitution more faithfully supports another configuration of the waiver power. To do so, this Article introduces the proxy-sovereign framework ...


The Constitutional Procedural Principle: A Normative Morphology For Gauging Threats To Judicial Independence, Tara Price Sep 2012

The Constitutional Procedural Principle: A Normative Morphology For Gauging Threats To Judicial Independence, Tara Price

Tara Price

For more than two hundred years, judicial review has served as the foundation of the American judicial branch. And yet, more than two centuries later, scholars and political figures continue to debate its proper place in American government. Recently, Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich waded into this debate, calling for members of Congress and the President to take stronger actions to check and balance what he termed “judicial supremacy.” Cries for a weakened judicial branch and insistence on the importance of reining in activist judges are becoming commonplace throughout American history.

As Gingrich and many before him have realized, the President ...


The Role Of Religion In A Catholic Law School: A Century Of Experience At Loyola University Chicago, Thomas M. Haney Sep 2012

The Role Of Religion In A Catholic Law School: A Century Of Experience At Loyola University Chicago, Thomas M. Haney

Thomas M. Haney

The purpose of this article is to examine the record of a Catholic law school, the School of Law of Loyola University Chicago, which a few years ago celebrated its centennial. This is a detailed study of how the Catholic identity of Loyola Chicago’s law school has manifested itself over the past century, during several distinct eras. The article concludes that the criteria chosen to identify a truly Catholic law school will determine the result of whether any particular law school is indeed Catholic, and that different scholars and commentators will choose different criteria, therefore arriving at different conclusions ...


Mandatory Reporting Of Abuse: A Historical Perspective On The Evolution Of States’ Current Mandatory Reporting Laws With A Review Of The Laws In The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania, Leonard G. Brown Iii Sep 2012

Mandatory Reporting Of Abuse: A Historical Perspective On The Evolution Of States’ Current Mandatory Reporting Laws With A Review Of The Laws In The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania, Leonard G. Brown Iii

Leonard G Brown III

Mandatory Reporting of Abuse: A Historical Perspective on the Evolution of States’ Current Mandatory Reporting Laws with a Review of the Laws in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

The first states passed laws in 1963, following the publishing of a seminal article titled, “The Battered Child Syndrome.” By 1967, all fifty states had passed some form of mandatory reporting law. The federal government’s first major foray into the area of child abuse prevention occurred on January 31, 1974, when Congress enacted the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (“CAPTA”). CAPTA has no federal mandatory reporting provision, but rather requires states ...


“On The Streets Of Doomed America” : Snyder V. Phelps Through A Millian Lens, David G. Lake Sep 2012

“On The Streets Of Doomed America” : Snyder V. Phelps Through A Millian Lens, David G. Lake

David G Lake

Although many Americans may be opposed to the Supreme Court’s ruling in Snyder v. Phelps, the Court protected traditional application of the freedom of speech by finding in favor of the Westboro Baptist Church. Specifically, the Supreme Court’s analysis of public vs. private speech issues in Snyder v. Phelps conforms to John Stuart Mill’s analysis of speech regulation in “On Liberty,” indicating that current freedom of speech jurisprudence continues to reflect Mill’s analysis and traditional ideas of this essential freedom.


The Thirteenth Amendment "Exception" To The State Action Doctrine: An Originalist Reappraisal, Ryan Walters Sep 2012

The Thirteenth Amendment "Exception" To The State Action Doctrine: An Originalist Reappraisal, Ryan Walters

Ryan Walters

There is an overwhelming consensus that the Thirteenth Amendment represents an exception to the general rule that the U.S. Constitution does not apply to private actors – the state action doctrine. There has never been an analysis of this assertion using reasonable-observer originalism. As a result, the consensus view on the Thirteenth Amendment threatens to undermine a key feature of the Constitution – that it provides rules of conduct solely for governmental actors.

This Essay uses reasonable-observer originalism to examine the text and context of the Thirteenth Amendment. This is the first analysis that finds that the Thirteenth Amendment is not ...


Changing The Paradigm Of International Criminal Law: Considering The Work Of The United Nations War Crimes Commission Of 1943-1948, Daniel T. Plesch, Shanti Sattler Sep 2012

Changing The Paradigm Of International Criminal Law: Considering The Work Of The United Nations War Crimes Commission Of 1943-1948, Daniel T. Plesch, Shanti Sattler

Daniel T Plesch

Changing the Paradigm of International Criminal Law: Considering the Work of the United Nations War Crimes Commission of 1943-1948 by Dr Dan Plesch and Shanti Sattler This article discusses the precedents of the largely forgotten United Nations War Crimes Commission (U.N.W.C.C.) of 1943-1948. The work of this multinational body should be regarded as a source of customary international law. We seek to introduce the U.N.W.C.C. and the thousands of national trials it supported into modern discourse about the development of international criminal justice and argue why they are relevant to current deliberations ...


Paul Clement And The State Of Conservative Legal Thought, Sam Singer Sep 2012

Paul Clement And The State Of Conservative Legal Thought, Sam Singer

Sam Singer

If 2011 is remembered as the year the states stood up to the Obama Administration and its bold vision of federal power, Paul Clement will be remembered as the lawyer they chose to make their case to the Supreme Court. In addition to the healthcare challenge, Clement appeared on behalf of Arizona in defense of the State’s sweeping new immigration law and helped Texas defend its new electoral map against interference from the federal courts. Along the way, he became the go-to lawyer for the states’ rights cause--a “shadow Solicitor General” leading the states in their push to reclaim ...


The Unity Thesis: How Positivism Distorts Constitutional Argument, John Lunstroth Aug 2012

The Unity Thesis: How Positivism Distorts Constitutional Argument, John Lunstroth

John Lunstroth

Democracy and civil rights are distorted and polarizing ideas that pit the rich against the poor, and should be abandoned in favor of an emphasis on the common good. To reach that conclusion I argue the US Constitution is and has always been designed to protect the wealth of the ruling class. All political associations or states have this as a central idea. My argument rests on a unique jurisprudential principle, the Unity Thesis. The main school of legal theory, positivism (the science of law) is based on the idea law is always separate from morals. I argue the opposite ...