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2005

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Heights Of Justice (Introduction And Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham Dec 2005

Heights Of Justice (Introduction And Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this pioneering book, Boston College Law School’s Academic Dean, Lawrence Cunningham, arranges selected contributions of his faculty’s scholarship into a meditation upon justice. The book weaves a combination of theory and practice to articulate moral and ethical values that facilitate rational application of law. It envisions legal arrangements imbued with commitments of the Jesuit tradition, including the dignity of persons, the common good and compassion for the poor. This reflective collection of inquiry evokes a signature motif of the BC Law faculty in dozens of different legal subjects. Materials downloadable from this abstract consist of: Table of ...


How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds (Duke University Press 2005), Jean Stefancic, Richard Delgado Nov 2005

How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds (Duke University Press 2005), Jean Stefancic, Richard Delgado

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

This is an excerpt from How Lawyer’s Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds. Professors Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado use historical investigation and critical analysis to diagnose the cause of the pervasive unhappiness among practicing lawyers. Most previous writers have blamed the high rate of burnout, depression, divorce, and drug and alcohol dependency among these highly paid professionals on the narrow specialization, long hours, and intense pressures of modern legal practice. Stefancic and Delgado argue that these professional demands are only symptoms of a deeper problem: the way lawyers are taught to think and reason. They ...


Seeing Beyond The Limits Of International Law. Book Review Of Jack L. Goldsmith And Eric A. Posner, The Limits Of International Law, Paul Schiff Berman Nov 2005

Seeing Beyond The Limits Of International Law. Book Review Of Jack L. Goldsmith And Eric A. Posner, The Limits Of International Law, Paul Schiff Berman

University of Connecticut School of Law Articles and Working Papers

In The Limits of International Law, Jack Goldsmith and Eric Posner use the simplifying assumptions of rational choice theory in an attempt to demonstrate that international law has no independent valence whatsoever. Rather, according to the authors, each state single-mindedly pursues its own rational interest and obeys international legal norms only to the extent that such norms serve those pre-existing interests. In this Review Essay, I argue that their vision of international law is deeply flawed. In particular, I take issue with the authors’ assumption that states simply have pre-existing unitary interests that they then rationally pursue. First, I argue ...


Comparative Law And Language, Vivian Grosswald Curran Nov 2005

Comparative Law And Language, Vivian Grosswald Curran

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

Comparative law is law’s cybernetics, or “theory of messiness.” It attempts to steer through the messiness of the foreign by reordering it into the language of the familiar without betraying the original. It is needed urgently in contexts of unrecognized metamorphosis, and today metamorphoses are burgeoning in murky areas outside of law’s traditional categories of either the national or the international. The less apparent, the less visibly foreign, the foreign is, the more comparative law has a task of translation involving the formation of a vocabulary to transmit new configurations that resist detection and articulation. This essay examines ...


Memory And Pluralism On A Property Law Frontier, Gregory Alan Hicks Nov 2005

Memory And Pluralism On A Property Law Frontier, Gregory Alan Hicks

ExpressO

This article explores the limits of legal victory and the problem of legitimacy of legal outcomes. It chronicles the decades-long dispute between Hispano settlers on northern New Mexico’s Sangre de Cristo land grant and the succession of entrepreneur owners of the grant in the last decades of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century. The dispute occurred on a legal and cultural frontier defined by the transition from Mexican to U.S. dominion in the years following the end of the Mexican War and by the opening of the region to larger scale economic development ...


Restorative Justice, Slavery And The American Soul, A Policy-Oriented Approach To The Question Of Slavery Reparations By The United States, Michael F. Blevins Nov 2005

Restorative Justice, Slavery And The American Soul, A Policy-Oriented Approach To The Question Of Slavery Reparations By The United States, Michael F. Blevins

ExpressO

This LL.M. Intercultural Human Rights thesis (May, 2005), awarded the best student paper prize for 2005 by the Institute of Policy Sciences at Yale University (in October, 2005), after analysing past and curent issues regarding the culture wars controversy of "reparations", proposes a specific process for establishing Truth and Reconciliation regarding the legacy of slavery in the United States. The proposal recommends commissions in each Federal judicial district under the supervision of a U.S. Slavery Justice and Reconciliation Commission (USSJRC), calling for "America's 21st Century Contract with Africa and African-Americans".


Adhering To The Old Line: Uncovering The History And Political Function Of The Unrelated Business Income Tax, Ethan Stone Oct 2005

Adhering To The Old Line: Uncovering The History And Political Function Of The Unrelated Business Income Tax, Ethan Stone

Ethan G. Stone

The paper examines the history of the building pressure during the 1940s the pass the UBIT and finds that the traditional explanations hide an underlying political function. As the charitable exemption became more important with the expansion of the income tax in the 1940s, it attracted new attention from both policymakers and a growing tax-shelter industry. Charities and sympathetic policymakers tried to justify a suddenly important blanket subsidy to charity on the basis of the charities exclusive dedication to good works. Tax-shelter promoters made the effort more difficult by featuring charities in roles, such as buying and leasing commercial real ...


Law And Accounting: Cases And Materials (Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham Sep 2005

Law And Accounting: Cases And Materials (Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Accounting textbooks for law or business schools invariably provide secondary narrative presentations of materials in the authors’ own words. A better approach to learning this subject is to present thematically arranged original accounting pronouncements. In so designing this innovative book, readers appreciate how accounting is a tool that provides conceptual organization to economic exchange. The tool facilitates analyzing legal, business and public policy aspects of the transactions that accounting addresses. The original accounting standards, as well as SEC enforcement actions, presented in this book illuminate why transactions are pursued and related decisions made, economic aspects of transactions, and the conceptual ...


Towards A Basal Tenth Amendment: A Riposte To National Bank Preemption Of State Consumer Protection Laws, Keith R. Fisher Sep 2005

Towards A Basal Tenth Amendment: A Riposte To National Bank Preemption Of State Consumer Protection Laws, Keith R. Fisher

ExpressO

Recent regulations promulgated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency assert a sweeping authority to preempt a broad array of state laws, including consumer protection laws, applicable not only to national banks but to their state-chartered operating subsidiaries. These regulations threaten to disrupt state efforts to combat predatory lending and other abusive practices and to interfere with a state’s sovereign authority over corporations chartered under its laws. Yet federal courts faced with challenges to these initiatives have failed to devote any substantial analysis to claims based on the Tenth Amendment. The problem with such claims is the ...


The 527 Problem . . . And The Buckley Problem, Richard Briffault Sep 2005

The 527 Problem . . . And The Buckley Problem, Richard Briffault

Columbia Public Law & Legal Theory Working Papers

In the world of campaign finance, 2004 was surely the year of the 527 committee. Named after the section of the Internal Revenue Code under which they are organized, 527s raised and spent more than $400 million, accounting for between a fifth and a fourth of total presidential election spending. Coming shortly after the Congress’s enactment, and the Supreme Court’s approval of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (“BCRA”) of 2002, the rise of the 527s has been seen as an evasion of BCRA and a return of the soft money problem that BCRA was supposed to have solved ...


Adjusting The Rear-View Mirror: Rethinking The Use Of History In Supreme Court Jurisprudence, Mitchell Gordon Sep 2005

Adjusting The Rear-View Mirror: Rethinking The Use Of History In Supreme Court Jurisprudence, Mitchell Gordon

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Who Are The Good Guys? The Legacy Of Watergate And The Tangled Webs We Weave, Jeffrey A. Breinholt Sep 2005

Who Are The Good Guys? The Legacy Of Watergate And The Tangled Webs We Weave, Jeffrey A. Breinholt

ExpressO

This article examines the astounding revelation that Deep Throat, the anonymous source that brought down the Nixon Presidency, was Mark Felt, the man who ran the FBI during the Watergate Scandal. Was Mark Felt a hero or a villain? Thanks to the recent publication of Bob Woodward’s The Secret Man in combination with historical case law, we now have more historical evidence about what motivated Felt and how he reacted to his own legal misfortunes. This article examines this record and shows that categorizing Felt along the hero/villain continuum is not an easy task, but argues that this ...


Mathematical Determinism: Natural Law's Missing Link - Jurisprudence's Missing Axioms , Ashley Saunders Lipson Sep 2005

Mathematical Determinism: Natural Law's Missing Link - Jurisprudence's Missing Axioms , Ashley Saunders Lipson

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Semi-Sovereign Corporation, Daniel J.H. Greenwood Aug 2005

The Semi-Sovereign Corporation, Daniel J.H. Greenwood

ExpressO

For at least a generation, corporate law scholars have worked within a paradigm of the corporation as a nexus of contracts, using metaphors drawn from contract, property, agency and trust to describe the relationships between shareholders and the firm as something like those of strangers in a market.

But historically, corporations were understood to be political organizations much like a miniature state or sovereign. The political view emphasizes that the participants in a firm include more than the public shareholders, that they have relationships with each other that extend beyond the momentary contact of strangers in a spot-market, and most ...


Rhetorical Holy War: Polygamy, Homosexuality, And The Paradox Of Community And Autonomy, Gregory C. Pingree Aug 2005

Rhetorical Holy War: Polygamy, Homosexuality, And The Paradox Of Community And Autonomy, Gregory C. Pingree

ExpressO

The article explores the rhetorical strategies deployed in both legal and cultural narratives of Mormon polygamy in nineteenth-century America. It demonstrates how an understanding of that unique communal experience, and the narratives by which it was represented, informs the classic paradox of community and autonomy – the tension between the collective and the individual. The article concludes by using the Mormon polygamy analysis to illuminate a contemporary social situation that underscores the paradox of community and autonomy – homosexuality and the so-called culture wars over family values and the meaning of marriage.


The Duty To Bargain In Good Faith: Nlrb V. Truitt Manufacturing Co. And Nlrb V. Insurance Agents’ International Union, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt Aug 2005

The Duty To Bargain In Good Faith: Nlrb V. Truitt Manufacturing Co. And Nlrb V. Insurance Agents’ International Union, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt

ExpressO

This article discusses two classic Supreme Court cases from the 1950's that explore the contours of the obligation to bargain in good faith: NLRB v. Truitt Manufacturing Co. and NLRB v. Insurance Agents' International Union. In the Truitt case, the Supreme Court held that the obligation to bargain in good faith requires an employer to open its books to the union when the employer refuses a request for a wage increase on the basis that such an increase will drive the employer out of business. In the Insurance Agents' case, the Supreme Court held that union slow-down tactics were ...


The Medieval Blood Sanction And The Divine Beneficence Of Pain: 1100 - 1450, Trisha Olson Jul 2005

The Medieval Blood Sanction And The Divine Beneficence Of Pain: 1100 - 1450, Trisha Olson

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Effect Of Myth On Primitive And Ancient Justice , Stuart Madden Jul 2005

The Effect Of Myth On Primitive And Ancient Justice , Stuart Madden

ExpressO

THE EFFECT OF MYTH ON PRIMITIVE AND ANCIENT JUSTICE M. Stuart Madden

Abstract In primitive and civilized cultures alike, myth has served as a foundational component of social structure and societal cultural self-image. For peoples with limitation on their skills of scientific inquiry and/or detached social observation, myth has served purposes ranging from explanation of the natural world to early visions of civil justice and a moral ethos. Such application of myth has necessarily and simultaneously provided adherents with the means of rationalizing the caprice and harshness of the natural world, as well as giving a means of accepting ...


The Abolition Of Wealth Transfer Taxes: Lessons From Canada, Australia, And New Zealand, David G. Duff May 2005

The Abolition Of Wealth Transfer Taxes: Lessons From Canada, Australia, And New Zealand, David G. Duff

ExpressO

When the United States acted to phase-out its estate tax by 2010, it joined a small but growing group of countries which have also repealed their wealth transfer taxes. In Canada, federal gift and estate taxes were repealed in 1972 and provincial wealth transfer taxes were abolished in the 1970s and 1980s. In Australia, State and Commonwealth wealth transfer taxes were repealed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. New Zealand followed suit in the 1990s, reducing estate tax rates to zero in 1992 and repealing the tax in 1999.

This paper reviews the abolition of wealth transfer taxes in ...


Judicial Review Before Marbury, William Michael Treanor May 2005

Judicial Review Before Marbury, William Michael Treanor

Fordham Law Faculty Colloquium Papers

While scholars have long probed the original understanding of judicial review and the early judicial review case law, this Article presents a study of the judicial review case law in the United States before Marbury v. Madison that is dramatically more complete than prior work and that challenges previous scholarship on the original understanding of judicial review on the two most critical dimensions: how well judicial review was established at the time of the Founding and when it was exercised. Where prior work argues that judicial review was rarely exercised before Marbury (or that it was created in Marbury), this ...


The Revenge Of Mullaney V. Wilbur: U.S. V. Booker And The Reassertion Of Judicial Limits On Legislative Power To Define Crimes, Ian Weinstein Apr 2005

The Revenge Of Mullaney V. Wilbur: U.S. V. Booker And The Reassertion Of Judicial Limits On Legislative Power To Define Crimes, Ian Weinstein

Fordham Law School Occasional Papers

This article offers a historically grounded account of the twists and turns in the Supreme Court's sentencing jurisprudence from the end of World War II to the Court's stunning rejection of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. The doctrinal shifts that have roiled this area of the law can best be understood as the Court's effort to respond to the changing political and social landscape of crime in America. In the mid 1970’s, legislative activity in the criminal law was largely focused on Model Penal Code influenced recodification. In that era, the Supreme Court took power from an ...


Copyright Law, The Production Of Creative Works And Cultural Growth In Cyberspace , Alina Ng Apr 2005

Copyright Law, The Production Of Creative Works And Cultural Growth In Cyberspace , Alina Ng

ExpressO

The Internet has affected information flow in copyrighted content in a profound manner. Authors and artists are enabled through the Internet to assert greater control over the flow of information in their works as these new technologies offer new and different distribution channels for content. These new technologies also allow consumers to use content in ways, which had not been anticipated by the copyright industries. This paper presents that copyright law was developed for a specific purpose, which was to encourage learning and growth. As new technologies emerge and as content industries experience changes in information flow in copyrighted works ...


Copyright Law, The Production Of Creative Works And Cultural Growth In Cyberspace , Alina Ng Apr 2005

Copyright Law, The Production Of Creative Works And Cultural Growth In Cyberspace , Alina Ng

ExpressO

The Internet has affected information flow in copyrighted content in a profound manner. Authors and artists are enabled through the Internet to assert greater control over the flow of information in their works as these new technologies offer new and different distribution channels for content. These new technologies also allow consumers to use content in ways, which had not been anticipated by the copyright industries. This paper presents that copyright law was developed for a specific purpose, which was to encourage learning and growth. As new technologies emerge and as content industries experience changes in information flow in copyrighted works ...


Law’S Box: Law, Jurisprudence And The Information Ecosphere, Paul D. Callister Apr 2005

Law’S Box: Law, Jurisprudence And The Information Ecosphere, Paul D. Callister

ExpressO

For so long as it has been important to know “what the law is,” the practice of law has been an information profession. Nonetheless, just how the information ecosphere affects legal discourse and thinking has never been systematically studied. Legal scholars study how law attempts to regulate information flow, but they say little about how information limits, shapes, and provides a medium for law to operate.

Part I of the paper introduces a holistic approach to “medium theory”—the idea that methods of communication influence social development and ideology—and applies the theory to the development of legal thinking and ...


Congress’S Power To Enforce Fourteenth Amendment Rights: Lessons From Federal Remedies The Framers Enacted, Robert J. Kaczorowski Apr 2005

Congress’S Power To Enforce Fourteenth Amendment Rights: Lessons From Federal Remedies The Framers Enacted, Robert J. Kaczorowski

Fordham Law Faculty Colloquium Papers

As early as 1793, Congress exercised plenary legislative power and enacted statutes that enforced the constitutionally secured property rights of slaveholders in their slaves with civil remedies, including a civil fine and tort damages, and criminal penalties and made them applicable to anyone who interfered with the slave owner’s constitutional right to recover fugitive slaves. Congress also created an elaborate federal enforcement structure. The United States Supreme Court repeatedly upheld the constitutionality of these statutes and Congress's plenary power to enact them. After the Civil War, the framers of the Fourteenth Amendment used these legislative and judicial precedents ...


Cleaning Up The Eighth Amendment Mess, Tom Stacy Mar 2005

Cleaning Up The Eighth Amendment Mess, Tom Stacy

ExpressO

This article criticizes the Court’s interpretation of the Eighth Amendment’s Cruel and Unusual Punishment Clause and proposes its own understanding. The Court’s jurisprudence is plagued by deep inconsistencies concerning the text, the Court’s own role, and a constitutional requirement of proportionate punishment.

In search of ways to redress these fundamental shortcomings, the article explores three alternative interpretations: 1) A textualist approach; 2) Justice Scalia’s understanding that the Clause forbids only punishments unacceptable for all offenses; and 3) a majoritarian approach that would consistently define cruel and unusual punishment in terms of legislative judgments and penal ...


The Transatlantic Constitution: Colonial Legal Culture And The Empire (Excerpt), Mary Sarah Bilder Mar 2005

The Transatlantic Constitution: Colonial Legal Culture And The Empire (Excerpt), Mary Sarah Bilder

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Departing from traditional approaches to colonial legal history, Mary Sarah Bilder argues that American law and legal culture developed within the framework of an evolving, unwritten transatlantic constitution that lawyers, legislators, and litigants on both sides of the Atlantic understood. The central tenet of this constitution--that colonial laws and customs could not be repugnant to the laws of England but could diverge for local circumstances--shaped the legal development of the colonial world. Focusing on practices rather than doctrines, Bilder describes how the pragmatic and flexible conversation about this constitution shaped colonial law: the development of the legal profession; the place ...


American Constitutionalism And Dualist Democracy, George Skouras Mar 2005

American Constitutionalism And Dualist Democracy, George Skouras

ExpressO

This article takes issue with Bruce Ackerman's Hegelian dialectical interpretation of American constitutionalism. It also argues, in particular, that Ackerman's notion of dualist democracy is not workable and, in general, the idea that democracy is a metaphysical concept.


A Right To No Meaningful Review: The Aftermath Of Shalala V. Illinois Council On Long Term Care, Inc., Ruqaiijah Ayanna Yearby Mar 2005

A Right To No Meaningful Review: The Aftermath Of Shalala V. Illinois Council On Long Term Care, Inc., Ruqaiijah Ayanna Yearby

ExpressO

A RIGHT TO NO MEANINGFUL REVIEW: THE AFTERMATH OF SHALALA v. ILLINOIS COUNCIL ON LONG TERM CARE, INC. Ruqaiijah A. Yearby

The Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment has been perverted in the federal administrative system. Federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), regularly deprive individuals of liberty and property with little to no review. In its regulation of the health care industry through the Medicare program, HHS often turns a blind eye to procedural Due Process protections, such as providing individuals an opportunity to challenge the deprivation of property at a ...