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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law In Books, Law In Action And Society, Alan Watson Apr 2006

Law In Books, Law In Action And Society, Alan Watson

Colloquia

I consider myself a comparative legal historian and range widely over time and space. My interest is in private law. My general conclusions, developed over years, on law in society are three and are interconnected and are as follows: 1) Governments are not much interested in developing law especially not private law. They generally leave this to subordinate law makers to whom, however, they do not grant power to make law; 2) Even when famous legislators emerge, they are seldom interested in inserting a particular social message or even certainty into their laws; 3) Borrowing is the name of the ...


Repraesentatio In Classical Latin, Alan Watson Jan 2006

Repraesentatio In Classical Latin, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

The Romans knew well the twin concepts of representation and representatives in law suits and in the relationships between father and son, and owner and slave. But for these concepts they did not use the terms repraesentare or any cognate.

To Tertullian, it seems, goes the credit of first using repraesentare and repraesentator in their modern senses of <> and <>. That his context is theological probably should not surprise since he is, above all, a theologian.

Thus he uses repraesentare to mean that the one larger and more important may represent the many and less important. This usage had a long ...


Two Early Codes, The Ten Commandments And The Twelve Tables: Causes And Consequences, Alan Watson Aug 2004

Two Early Codes, The Ten Commandments And The Twelve Tables: Causes And Consequences, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

Comments on the legal history of the ten commandments and the Roman Twelve Tables, and a comparison of the two legal collections. This paper also discusses the peculiarities in the traditions behind the collection of these laws; and the rules of behavior between humans covered by these laws.


Intervention In Roman Law: A Case Study In The Hazards Of Legal Scholarship, Peter A. Appel Jan 2002

Intervention In Roman Law: A Case Study In The Hazards Of Legal Scholarship, Peter A. Appel

Scholarly Works

In this Article, I offer a case study of one of the hazards presented by legal scholarship in law reviews as it has evolved over the last century. The standard law review article typically begins with an overview of the author's subject, frequently involving a historical perspective or a chronology of the development of a doctrine. This background section stems from a number of causes, but many attribute it to the fact that most law reviews are student-edited. In order to evaluate an author's argument, students need a brief course in, say, the basics of trade law and ...


Aspects Of Reception Of Law, Alan Watson Apr 1996

Aspects Of Reception Of Law, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

In most places at most times borrowing is the most fruitful source of legal change. The borrowing may be from within the system, by analogy - from negligence in torts to negligence in contract, for instance - or from another legal system. The act of borrowing is usually simple. To build up a theory of borrowing on the other hand, seems to be an extremely complex matter. Receptions come in all shapes and sizes: from taking over single rules to (theoretically) almost a whole system. They present an array of social phenomena that are not easily explained: from whom can one borrow ...


Overview Of The Role Of Precedent In The Legal System Of The United States, Ana Elena Fierro Jan 1995

Overview Of The Role Of Precedent In The Legal System Of The United States, Ana Elena Fierro

LLM Theses and Essays

Traditionally, legal systems have been classified as either Common Law or Civil Law; scholars distinguish these systems based on their origins, as well their attitudes towards stare decisis. Common law considers precedent as a source of binding rules, while civil law does not. However, some scholars consider the methods for legal reasoning to be almost the same in every legal system. These scholars maintain that regardless of the source of law in a particular country, once a judge determines that the facts of one case are similar to those regulated by a certain rule, the judge will apply that particular ...


Foreign Investment In Sub-Saharan Africa: How Changing Attitudes Have Affected The Legal Environment In The Post Cold War Era, Joel Waswa Kisubika Jan 1995

Foreign Investment In Sub-Saharan Africa: How Changing Attitudes Have Affected The Legal Environment In The Post Cold War Era, Joel Waswa Kisubika

LLM Theses and Essays

In Sub-Saharan Africa, like many other third world and former Soviet bloc countries, economic development policies revolve around raising the standard of living for their people. Therefore, they are seeking different ways to attract investment, trade, technology, and jobs. The movement towards attracting foreign investment has been paralleled by democratic political reforms and economic liberalization of previously autocratic and restrictive systems. These reforms have been enacted, mostly at the insistence of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, in order to deal with the severe foreign debt situation and improve Sub-Saharan Africa’s opportunities for attracting foreign investment. This ...


The Importance Of 'Nutshells', Alan Watson Jan 1994

The Importance Of 'Nutshells', Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

In modern legal systems, common law and civil law alike, and their spread over many territories in several continents, are inconceivable without the input of Nutshells often written in far-off times and in far-away places. I also want to show that the history of Nutshells vividly illumines themes that I have pressed for decades.3 First, they demonstrate the easy transmissibility of legal rules, institutions, concepts and structures from one society to other, very different, ones. Second, they indicate the frequent longevity of such rules, institutions, concepts and structures. Third, their very success is attributable to the lack of interest ...


Roman Law And English Law: Two Patterns Of Legal Development, Alan Watson Jul 1990

Roman Law And English Law: Two Patterns Of Legal Development, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

It is commonplace among scholars to link in thought the growth of Roman law and of English law. S.F.C. Milsom begins his distinguished Historical Foundations of the Common Law with the words: "It has happened twice only that the customs of European peoples were worked up into intellectual systems of law; and much of the world today is governed by laws derived from the one or the other." More strikingly, some scholars see an essential similarity in legal approaches in the two systems. Fritz Pringsheim entitled a well-known article The Inner Relationship Between English and Roman Law. W ...