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Full-Text Articles in Law

A More Cost Effective Model For Legal Education, Jack Graves Sep 2013

A More Cost Effective Model For Legal Education, Jack Graves

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In his most recent book, Richard Susskind focuses on three primary drivers of change in the market for legal services: (1) the “more-for-less” challenge; (2) the “liberalization” of the regulatory environment; and (3) the effective use of “information technology.” These same three drivers provide the keys to unlocking a more efficient and effective system of legal education. The price of a legal education must be significantly reduced at the vast majority of law schools, and we must deliver a better education at this reduced price. Together, these two objectives comprise the obvious, yet daunting, “more-for-less” challenge we face as educators ...


Rethinking U.S. Legal Education: No More "Same Old, Same Old", Nancy B. Rapoport Jan 2013

Rethinking U.S. Legal Education: No More "Same Old, Same Old", Nancy B. Rapoport

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In this Essay, I suggest that we should think about how to create a curriculum that encourages students to develop a variety of skill sets. Law students simply don’t need three years of Socratic questioning regarding the fine details of court opinions. They need a wide range of experiences, preferably building on skill sets (like the twenty-six Berkeley factors) that effective lawyers have developed. A law school’s curriculum should have courses that focus on different factors in each year of law school. Ultimately, what we should be teaching law students is how to develop the judgment to advise ...


An Essay On Rebuilding And Renewal In American Legal Education, Jack Graves Jan 2013

An Essay On Rebuilding And Renewal In American Legal Education, Jack Graves

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The American model of legal education is broken as a value proposition. Like a building with an undermined foundation, it must be rebuilt rather than refurbished. And, like any rebuilding project, it will be costly and disruptive to many of its occupants. However, it will also present unique opportunities for innovation and renewal. This essay suggests a few of the contours for such a rebuilding project and describes a few of the benefits that might result.


On Teaching Conflicts And Why I Dislike Allstate Insurance Co. V. Hague, Thomas O. Main Jan 2012

On Teaching Conflicts And Why I Dislike Allstate Insurance Co. V. Hague, Thomas O. Main

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No abstract provided.


Towards A New World Of Externships: Introduction To Papers From Externships 4 And 5, Alex Scherr, Harriet N. Katz Oct 2010

Towards A New World Of Externships: Introduction To Papers From Externships 4 And 5, Alex Scherr, Harriet N. Katz

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The scholarly literature on externships is growing and deepening, addressing concerns of importance to field placement programs and to clinicians in general. This Introduction places the issues raised by the subsequent four articles on externships into the context of current national debates about the externship method. These issues, which both extend and diverge from current thinking about externship pedagogy, include: 1) the impact of a harsh economic climate; 2) the educational potential of placements in corporate counsel offices; 3) the argument for compensating students in for-credit placements; and 4) the value of course design for teaching power dynamics in supervisory ...


Report And Recommendations On The Status Of Clinical Faculty In The Legal Academy, Katherine R. Kruse Jan 2010

Report And Recommendations On The Status Of Clinical Faculty In The Legal Academy, Katherine R. Kruse

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"Report and Recommendations on the Status of Clinical Faculty in the Legal Academy" identifies and evaluates the most appropriate modes for clinical faculty appointments in the legal academy, concluding that legal education is best served when full-time clinical faculty are appointed predominantly on a unitary tenure-track model. Drawing on data collected through a survey of clinical program directors and faculty, the Report analyzes the five most identifiable clinical faculty models: unitary tenure track; clinical tenure track; long-term contract; short-term contract; and clinical fellowships. It determines that, despite great strides in the growth of clinical legal education in the last 30 ...


Vico's "Ingenious Method" And Legal Education, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2008

Vico's "Ingenious Method" And Legal Education, Francis J. Mootz Iii

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Contemporary discussions about the need to reform legal education, culminating in the 2007 Carnegie Report, should be put into a broader historical, philosophical and ethical perspective. Three hundred years ago the Italian humanist, Giambattista Vico delivered his famous oration, "On the Study Methods of Our Time," in which he lamented the rise of Cartesian critical philosophy at the expense of the cultivation of imagination, prudence and eloquence. Vico discussed law and legal education as his primary example, and his oration therefore provides an incredible resource for our contemporary deliberations.

Part One considers the literature addressing the demise of legal professionalism ...


Vico, Llewellyn And The Task Of Legal Education, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2008

Vico, Llewellyn And The Task Of Legal Education, Francis J. Mootz Iii

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Legal education fails students by not appreciating the rhetorical basis of legal reasoning and argumentation. I draw from Vico's "On the Study Methods of Our Time" and Llewellyn's legal realism; both argued that law and legal reasoning are exemplary sites of rhetoric. I suggest that contemporary cognitive studies of the metaphorical structure of human understanding and the initiatives of the "new legal realism" carry forward the insights of Vico and Llewellyn. This re-orientation corrects the shallow and instrumentalist outlook of most lawyers.


Recruiting Sexual Minorities And People With Disabilities To Be Dean, Joan W. Howarth Jan 2008

Recruiting Sexual Minorities And People With Disabilities To Be Dean, Joan W. Howarth

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As our day-to-day work lives make abundantly clear, a law faculty is a many-headed creature: an assortment of people with a variety of interests, strengths, foibles, personalities, and identities. Within the legal academy, a dominant consensus acknowledges that a strong faculty embodies diversity along multiple axes, including, for example, race, gender, religion, age, political ideology, research and teaching methodologies, and subject matter expertise.

The dean, however, stands alone, and stands above. Thus, issues of expectation, representation, comfort with and fear of difference operate quite differently when deans are selected, and when they do their jobs. The dean exercises authority over ...


The Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot: Making The Most Of An Extraordinary Educational Opportunity, Jack M. Graves, Stephanie A. Vaughan Jan 2006

The Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot: Making The Most Of An Extraordinary Educational Opportunity, Jack M. Graves, Stephanie A. Vaughan

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No abstract provided.


Women In Corporate Law Teaching: A Tale Of Two Generations, Margaret V. Sachs Jan 2006

Women In Corporate Law Teaching: A Tale Of Two Generations, Margaret V. Sachs

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This Article is divided into three parts. Part I focuses on [Margaret Harris] Amsler and Part II addresses the second generation. Part III explores a question that was prompted by the second generation and that goes to the heart of this Symposium: Do women corporations professors damage their standing in the academic community by examining the interface between corporate law and gender?


Torts In Verse: The Foundational Cases, R. Perry Sentell Jr. Jul 2005

Torts In Verse: The Foundational Cases, R. Perry Sentell Jr.

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This Article contains a "verse," "rhyme," or "poem" for each of the truly foundational cases ordinarily studied in first year Torts. The arrangement assumes a typical Torts casebook's order of presentation, but is fairly flexible. Each entry initially sketches the selected case's significance to the body of Tort law and then follows with the verse. The "rhymes" themselves are admittedly (indeed, intentionally) contrived and pedantic, seeking to elicit groans--but hopefully groans of recognition and familiarity. Ideally, the student will most "enjoy" a verse while reading and studying the case itself; indeed, some verse references make little sense otherwise.


Lyman Ray Patterson: Scholar And Gentle Man, Paul M. Kurtz Jan 2004

Lyman Ray Patterson: Scholar And Gentle Man, Paul M. Kurtz

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The University of Georgia School of Law community and the legal academy lost a dear friend, an outstanding scholar, and a wonderful colleague and teacher when Ray Patterson died after a long career and a short illness in November 2003.


Legal Education Reform: Modest Suggestions, Alan Watson Jan 2001

Legal Education Reform: Modest Suggestions, Alan Watson

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No approach to legal education will be perfect, given that (in my opinion) a law school should serve various purposes. But I should like to offer a few modest and practical suggestions. They are modest in that they do not require additional time for law studies. They are practical in that they will increase the exposure of students both to law as practice and to law as an intellectual discipline. In addition they involve no greater burden on law schools.

First, and this should not be controversial -- but I fear will be the most controversial -- would be the disappearance of ...


Foreword: The Many Passions Of Teaching Corporations, Charles R.T. O'Kelley Jan 2000

Foreword: The Many Passions Of Teaching Corporations, Charles R.T. O'Kelley

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This Symposium belies such skeptical views of the Corporations course and those of us who teach it. The 1999 Teaching Corporate Law Conference was organized around teachers' self-identified passions in teaching Corporations--the themes, insights, skills or puzzles about which they are most intrigued or enthused. Thirty-seven professors made presentations at the Conference; twenty-eight have converted their presentations into the essays in this Symposium edition, which have been grouped substantively rather than in the exact order presented at the Conference.


Introduction To Law For Second-Year Students?, Alan Watson Sep 1996

Introduction To Law For Second-Year Students?, Alan Watson

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The casebook method of teaching is, in fact, an exercise in futility. It is the students themselves who are expected to build up a picture of law from the few generally disconnected scraps available to them and with virtually no tools. Students are left to guess what the editors' view of the law is rather than getting to what the law is all about. Instead of looking at the reasoning of a case in the light of the developed conceptual thought that preceded it, and of its place in a structured web of reasoned principle, they are provided in the ...


Busting The Hart & Wechsler Paradigm, Michael L. Wells Jan 1995

Busting The Hart & Wechsler Paradigm, Michael L. Wells

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Federal Courts law was once a vibrant area of scholarship and an essential course for intellectually ambitious students. Now its prestige has diminished so much that scholars debate its future in a recent issue of the Vanderbilt Law Review, where even one of its champions calls it (albeit in the subjunctive mood) a “scholarly backwater.” What, if anything, went wrong, and what should Federal Courts scholars do about it? In his contribution to the Vanderbilt symposium, Richard Fallon defends the reigning model of Federal Courts law, an approach to jurisdictional issues that dates from the publication in 1953 of Henry ...