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Cleveland State University

Legal Writing and Research

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Academic Research And Advocacy Research, Victor L. Streib Jan 1988

Academic Research And Advocacy Research, Victor L. Streib

Cleveland State Law Review

Research is something we all do. Some research is a necessary evil, some a delightful passage, some unmitigated drudgery. Our general concern this evening is to hone the concept of legal research, at least as it is manifested by law professors and lawyers. More specifically, how does academic research and advocacy research differ in the world of law and what unique obligations might such differences suggest for the law professoriate? The general issue is the difference, perhaps conflict, between research aimed primarily at discovering truth and expanding knowledge versus research aimed primarily at mounting an argument to achieve victory for ...


How To Write And Speak More Effectively As Advocate, Negotiator, Or Counselor -- Suggestions To The Budding Lawyer, Arthur R. Landever Jan 1980

How To Write And Speak More Effectively As Advocate, Negotiator, Or Counselor -- Suggestions To The Budding Lawyer, Arthur R. Landever

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

How best to give you some ideas about legal communication? The traditional approach is to focus narrowly upon a particular type, for example, appellate oral argument. My approach is different. I view communication in its total aspect -- whatever its general nature (e.g. writing or speech), degree of formality (e.g. brief or office negotiation), or audience (e.g. lawyer or layman). My ideas proceed from a fundamental assumption: As a student you can gain insights about the subject, by first studying the broad canvas. As you then reflect upon any particular mode, it can be set against that background ...


On Legal Writing, Albert P. Blaustein Jan 1969

On Legal Writing, Albert P. Blaustein

Cleveland State Law Review

Virtually all legal writing is atrocious! This is true about (a) statutes and administrative regulations; (b) judicial opinions and agency rulings; (c) trial papers and appellate briefs; (d) office memoranda and opinion letters; (e) annotations and digest paragraphs; and (f) law treatises and legal articles. It is even true (especially true?) about articles on legal writing. This is a serious matter. For the ramifications of bad legal writing are very costly-in time, in money and, indeed, in the very quality of life. Working to improve legal writing is no frivolous exercise.