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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Upgraded Lawyer: Modern Technology And Its Impact On The Legal Profession, Thomas R. Moore Mar 2019

The Upgraded Lawyer: Modern Technology And Its Impact On The Legal Profession, Thomas R. Moore

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

At the peak of the Space Race in 1963, President John F. Kennedy remarked that, despite the great leaps brought by technology, "man is still the most extraordinary computer of all." With the advent of the internet and artificial intelligence, today's technological advancements might have shaken even Kennedy's faith in human superiority. For the legal profession, new technology presents a challenge to traditional notions in the practice of law as well. Clients may grow to expect tech-savviness from their attorneys, especially when their cases involve digital concepts. At the same time, the necessity for flesh-and-blood counsel may be ...


Making Method Visible: Improving The Quality Of Science-Based Regulation, Pasky Pascual, Wendy Wagner, Elizabeth Fisher Apr 2013

Making Method Visible: Improving The Quality Of Science-Based Regulation, Pasky Pascual, Wendy Wagner, Elizabeth Fisher

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

Scientific inferences are theories about how the world works that scientists formulate based on their observations. One of the most difficult issues at the intersection of law and science is to determine whether the weight of evidence supports one scientific inference versus other competing interpretations of the observations. In administrative law, this difficulty is exacerbated by the behavior of both the courts and regulatory agencies. Agencies seldom achieve the requisite visibility that explains the analytical methods they use to reach their scientific inferences. Courts—because they appreciate neither the variety of inferential methods nor their epistemic foundations—do not demand ...


Framing The Issues For Cameras In The Courtrooms: Redefining Judicial Dignity And Decorum, A Wayne Mackay Apr 1996

Framing The Issues For Cameras In The Courtrooms: Redefining Judicial Dignity And Decorum, A Wayne Mackay

Dalhousie Law Journal

This article examines the role of s. 2(b) of the Charter of Rights in determining the role of cameras in Canadian courtrooms. The discussions reveal that arguments in opposition to cameras are largely unfounded and in contradiction to the freedom of expression guarantee. The denial of the right is in reality based on judges' and lawyers' fear of loss of control of the courtroom environment. Cameras should only be banned from courtrooms as part of a total publication ban, and then only after a careful s. 1 analysis