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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Law

Behind The Shield? Law Enforcement Agencies And The Self-Critical Analysis Privilege, Josh Jones Sep 2003

Behind The Shield? Law Enforcement Agencies And The Self-Critical Analysis Privilege, Josh Jones

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


New Opportunities For Obtaining And Using Litigation Reserves And Disclosures, Matthew J. Barrett Jan 2003

New Opportunities For Obtaining And Using Litigation Reserves And Disclosures, Matthew J. Barrett

Journal Articles

Following the publication of Opportunities for Obtaining and Using Litigation Reserves and Disclosures, which highlighted the helpful information about litigation reserves that a litigator can often detect or discover from an opponent's financial statements, accounting books and records, tax returns, public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC), and auditor, two important regulatory developments occurred in early 2003 that create additional opportunities to obtain information about an opponent's assessments of (i) expected liability in the underlying case or (ii) obligations or settlements in similar cases. First, pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the SEC issued ...


Regulation Of Lawyers Without The Code, The Rules, Or The Restatement: Or, What Do Honor And Shame Have To Do With Civil Discovery Practice?, W. Bradley Wendel Jan 2003

Regulation Of Lawyers Without The Code, The Rules, Or The Restatement: Or, What Do Honor And Shame Have To Do With Civil Discovery Practice?, W. Bradley Wendel

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Lesson In The Development Of The Law, Judith S. Kaye, Matthew J. Morris Jan 2003

A Lesson In The Development Of The Law, Judith S. Kaye, Matthew J. Morris

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


Forgetfulness, Fuzziness, Functionality, Fairness And Freedom, In Dispute Resolution, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2003

Forgetfulness, Fuzziness, Functionality, Fairness And Freedom, In Dispute Resolution, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Professor Subrin is a self-professed traditionalist who has been one of the most forceful defenders of what I might term neo-traditional “Clarkian” litigation. By that, I mean the model of civil disputing in which litigation is a primary vehicle. More important, the litigation is based on notice pleading, broad discovery, and a preference for adjudication on the merits.

Key Subrin works over the years have focused on the historical path of the Clarkian model, which served to fuel much of the law revolution of the mid-Twentieth Century, to the “new era” of civil procedure and dispute resolution that dominated the ...


Discovery Of Information And Documents From A Litigant's Former Employees: Synergy And Synthesis Of Civil Rules, Ethical Standards, Privilege Doctrines, And Common Law Principles, Susan J. Becker Jan 2003

Discovery Of Information And Documents From A Litigant's Former Employees: Synergy And Synthesis Of Civil Rules, Ethical Standards, Privilege Doctrines, And Common Law Principles, Susan J. Becker

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The goal of this Article is to untangle some of the issues surrounding the recurring dilemmas posed by discovery of information held by former employees. Part II of this Article elucidates the competing interests of the litigators, their respective clients, the courts, and the potential witnesses when discovery is sought from former employees of a party. Part III provides a brief overview of the various legal authorities that govern an attorney's discovery of former employees and the synergy created by these sources. Part IV examines the potential pitfalls attorneys encounter when pursuing informal discovery of former employees of a ...


Destruction Of Documents Before Proceedings Commence: What Is A Court To Do?, Camille Cameron, Jonathan Liberman Jan 2003

Destruction Of Documents Before Proceedings Commence: What Is A Court To Do?, Camille Cameron, Jonathan Liberman

Articles, Book Chapters, & Blogs

The effective performance by courts of their adjudicative role depends on the availability of relevant evidence. In civil proceedings, the discovery process aims to ensure that such evidence is available. If documents that would be relevant evidence in a trial are destroyed, a fair adjudication is made difficult, if not impossible. This is so whether the destruction of documents occurs before or after proceedings commence. This article asks what a trial judge should do in a situation where relevant evidence is unavailable because one of the parties has destroyed documents before the proceedings commenced but anticipating that such proceedings were ...


Assessing Sovereign Interests In Cross-Border Discovery Disputes: Lessons From Aerospatiale, Hannah Buxbaum Jan 2003

Assessing Sovereign Interests In Cross-Border Discovery Disputes: Lessons From Aerospatiale, Hannah Buxbaum

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The Hague Evidence Convention addresses a particular kind of jurisdictional conflict: the conflict between one nation's issuance of extraterritorial discovery orders and another nation's right to govern discovery activity taking place within its territory. The particular mechanisms that the Convention establishes for use in cross-border discovery proceedings, and the compromises between civil-law and common-law procedures for evidence gathering that it embodies, were effected with that system goal in mind. In Aerospatiale, the Supreme Court considered the scope of the Convention's application, addressing the interaction of Convention procedures and pre-existing federal rules on evidence gathering. As portions of ...