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The Miranda Custody Requirement And Juveniles, Paul Marcus Sep 2019

The Miranda Custody Requirement And Juveniles, Paul Marcus

Paul Marcus

Concerns about the interrogation process and the ability of minors to navigate the criminal justice system often intersect. The impact of the age of juveniles can be seen in a variety of judicial decisions, most markedly those dealing with punishment. But judicial concern for juveniles goes well beyond sentencing. The interrogation process raises especially grave fears.

Since the Supreme Court issued its landmark ruling in Miranda v. Arizona disallowing compelled inculpatory statements by criminal suspects and defendants, there has been concern as to whether juveniles fully understand and appreciate their rights as articulated in Miranda and based in the Fifth ...


Proving Entrapment Under The Predisposition Test, Paul Marcus Sep 2019

Proving Entrapment Under The Predisposition Test, Paul Marcus

Paul Marcus

No abstract provided.


Australia And The United States: Two Common Criminal Justice Systems Uncommonly At Odds, Paul Marcus, Vicki Waye Sep 2019

Australia And The United States: Two Common Criminal Justice Systems Uncommonly At Odds, Paul Marcus, Vicki Waye

Paul Marcus

At first glance the criminal justice systems of Australia and the United States look strikingly similar. With common law roots from England, they both emphasize the adversary system, the roleof the advocate, the presumption of innocence, and an appeals process. Upon closer reflection,however, they appear starkly different. From both Australian and U.S. perspectives, the authorsexplore those differences, examining important features such as the exclusion of evidence, rules regarding interrogation, the entrapment defense, and the open nature of trials. The Article concludes with an analysis of the reasons for those differences, reasons that heavily relate back to the founding ...


Procuring Guilty Pleas For International Crimes: The Limited Influence Of Sentencing Discounts, Nancy Amoury Combs Sep 2019

Procuring Guilty Pleas For International Crimes: The Limited Influence Of Sentencing Discounts, Nancy Amoury Combs

Nancy Combs

International tribunals prosecuting those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes face many of the same resource constraints that bedevil national criminal justice systems. Consequently, international tribunals have begun to utilize various procedural devices long used by national prosecutors to speed case dispositions. One such procedural device is the guilty plea. National prosecutors induce criminal defendants to plead guilty and waive their rights to trial through a process of plea bargaining; that is, by offering defendants sentencing concessions in exchange for their guilty pleas. International prosecutors who seek to engage in plea bargaining, however, face a host of ...


International Criminal Jurisprudence Comes Of Age: The Substance And Procedure Of An Emerging Discipline, Nancy Amoury Combs Sep 2019

International Criminal Jurisprudence Comes Of Age: The Substance And Procedure Of An Emerging Discipline, Nancy Amoury Combs

Nancy Combs

No abstract provided.


Prisoner's Rights And The Correctional Scheme: The Legal Controversy And Problems Of Implementation - A Symposium - Introduction, Donald W. Dowd Jun 2017

Prisoner's Rights And The Correctional Scheme: The Legal Controversy And Problems Of Implementation - A Symposium - Introduction, Donald W. Dowd

Donald W. Dowd

No abstract provided.


Law Enforcement And Criminal Law Decisions, Erwin Chemerinsky Jun 2017

Law Enforcement And Criminal Law Decisions, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

No abstract provided.


Diminishing Probable Cause And Minimalist Searches, Kit Kinports Jan 2016

Diminishing Probable Cause And Minimalist Searches, Kit Kinports

Kit Kinports

This paper comments on recent Supreme Court opinions that have used phrases such as "reasonable belief" and "reason to believe" when analyzing intrusions that generally require proof of probable cause. Historically, the Court used these terms as shorthand references for both probable cause and reasonable suspicion. While this lack of precision was unobjectionable when the concepts were interchangeable, that has not been true since Terry v. Ohio created a distinction between the two standards. When the Justices then resurrect these terms without situating them in the dichotomy between probable cause and reasonable suspicion, it is not clear whether they are ...


Moving Beyond Miranda: Concessions For Confessions, Scott Howe Dec 2015

Moving Beyond Miranda: Concessions For Confessions, Scott Howe

Scott W. Howe

Abstract: The law governing police interrogation provides perverse incentives. For criminal suspects, the law rewards obstruction and concealment. For police officers, it honors deceit and psychological aggression. For the courts and the rest of us, it encourages blindness and rationalization. This Article contends that the law could help foster better behaviors. The law could incentivize criminals to confess without police trickery and oppression. It could motivate police officers involved in obtaining suspect statements to avoid chicanery and duress. And, it could summon courts and the rest of us to speak more truthfully about whether suspect admissions are the product of ...


Panelist, Wrongful Conviction And The Dna Revolution: 25 Years Of Freeing The Innocent, Robert Bloom Sep 2015

Panelist, Wrongful Conviction And The Dna Revolution: 25 Years Of Freeing The Innocent, Robert Bloom

Robert M. Bloom

No abstract provided.


The Preliminary Hearing: A Necessary Part Of Due Process, Andrea Lyon Feb 2015

The Preliminary Hearing: A Necessary Part Of Due Process, Andrea Lyon

Andrea D. Lyon

No abstract provided.


Don't Take His Eye, Don't Take His Tooth, And Don't Cast The First Stone: Limiting Religious Arguments In Capital Cases, John H. Blume, Sheri Lynn Johnson Dec 2014

Don't Take His Eye, Don't Take His Tooth, And Don't Cast The First Stone: Limiting Religious Arguments In Capital Cases, John H. Blume, Sheri Lynn Johnson

John H. Blume

Professors John H. Blume and Sheri Lynn Johnson explore the occurrences of religious imagery and argument invoked by both prosecutors and defense attorneys in capital cases. Such invocation of religious imagery and argument by attorneys is not surprising, considering that the jurors who hear such arguments are making life and death decisions, and advocates, absent regulation, will resort to such emotionally compelling arguments. Also surveying judicial responses to such arguments in courts, Professors Blume and Johnson gauge the level of tolerance for such arguments in specific jurisdictions. Presenting proposed rules for prosecutors and defense counsel who wish to employ religious ...


People V. Coughlin And Criticisms Of The Criminal Jury In Late Nineteenth-Century Chicago, Elizabeth Dale Nov 2014

People V. Coughlin And Criticisms Of The Criminal Jury In Late Nineteenth-Century Chicago, Elizabeth Dale

Elizabeth Dale

The last decades of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century are typically characterized as the era in which the criminal jury trial came to an end. Although criminal juries did not completely disappear, their role became smaller and smaller across that time frame. Most studies of this phenomenon attribute that decline to the rise of plea bargains in that same period. Specifically, these studies lead to the conclusion that institutional factors, such as case loads and the political pressure on elected prosecutors to be "tough on crime," made plea bargains an increasingly attractive option for ...


Kidnapping Incorporated: The Unregulated Youth-Transportation Industry And The Potential For Abuse, Ira P. Robbins Dec 2013

Kidnapping Incorporated: The Unregulated Youth-Transportation Industry And The Potential For Abuse, Ira P. Robbins

Ira P. Robbins

Strangers come into a child's room in the middle of the night, drag her kicking and screaming into a van, apply handcuffs, and drive her to a behavior modification facility at a distant location. What sounds like a clear-cut case of kidnapping is complicated by the fact that the child's parents not only authorized this intervention, but also paid for it. This scarcely publicized practice-known as the youth-transportation industry-operates on the fringes of existing law. The law generally presumes that parents have almost unlimited authority over their children, but the youth-transportation industry has never been closely examined regarding ...


Last Words: A Survey And Analysis Of Federal Judges' Views On Allocution In Sentencing, Ira P. Robbins Dec 2013

Last Words: A Survey And Analysis Of Federal Judges' Views On Allocution In Sentencing, Ira P. Robbins

Ira P. Robbins

Allocution-the penultimate stage of a criminal proceeding at which the judge affords defendants an opportunity to speak their last words before sentencing-is a centuries-old right in criminal cases, and academics have theorized about the various purposes it serves. But what do sitting federal judges think about allocution? Do they actually use it to raise or lower sentences? Do they think it serves purposes above and beyond sentencing? Are there certain factors that judges like or dislike in allocutions? These questions-and many others-are answered directly in this first-ever study of judges' views and practices regarding allocution. The authors surveyed all federal ...


The Voice Of Reason—Why Recent Judicial Interpretations Of The Antiterrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act’S Restrictions On Habeas Corpus Are Wrong, Judith L. Ritter Nov 2013

The Voice Of Reason—Why Recent Judicial Interpretations Of The Antiterrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act’S Restrictions On Habeas Corpus Are Wrong, Judith L. Ritter

Judith L Ritter

By filing a petition for a federal writ of habeas corpus, a prisoner initiates a legal proceeding collateral to the direct appeals process. Federal statutes set forth the procedure and parameters of habeas corpus review. The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) first signed into law by President Clinton in 1996, included significant cut-backs in the availability of federal writs of habeas corpus. This was by congressional design. Yet, despite the dire predictions, for most of the first decade of AEDPA’s reign, the door to habeas relief remained open. More recently, however, the Supreme Court reinterpreted a key ...


"Automobile Searches." Chapter 4d, 4d-1– 4d-62, "Suppression Of Illegally Obtained Evidence: Pretext Searches." Chapter 83, 83-1 - 83-18, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

"Automobile Searches." Chapter 4d, 4d-1– 4d-62, "Suppression Of Illegally Obtained Evidence: Pretext Searches." Chapter 83, 83-1 - 83-18, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Criminal Procedure Mate: Searches And Seizures, Interrogation, Identifications, And Exclusionary Remedy, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Criminal Procedure Mate: Searches And Seizures, Interrogation, Identifications, And Exclusionary Remedy, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Searches, Seizures, And Warrants: A Reference Guide To The United States Constitution, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Searches, Seizures, And Warrants: A Reference Guide To The United States Constitution, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Updates Editor: Chapters 3, 6, 31-36, 81, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Updates Editor: Chapters 3, 6, 31-36, 81, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Criminal Procedure: Examples And Explanations, Robert Bloom, Mark Brodin Oct 2013

Criminal Procedure: Examples And Explanations, Robert Bloom, Mark Brodin

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Cases On Criminal Procedure, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Cases On Criminal Procedure, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Criminal Procedure: Examples And Expanations, Robert Bloom, Mark Brodin Oct 2013

Criminal Procedure: Examples And Expanations, Robert Bloom, Mark Brodin

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


"Commencement Of Action." Chapter 3 (Co-Authored With Daniel R. Coquillette) 3-1–3-34, "Time." Chapter 6, 6-1– 6-143, "Applicability In General." Chapter 81, 81-1–81-40, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

"Commencement Of Action." Chapter 3 (Co-Authored With Daniel R. Coquillette) 3-1–3-34, "Time." Chapter 6, 6-1– 6-143, "Applicability In General." Chapter 81, 81-1–81-40, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Ratting: The Use And Abuse Of Informants In The American Justice System, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Ratting: The Use And Abuse Of Informants In The American Justice System, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Criminal Procedure: The Constitution And The Police, Examples And Explanations, Robert Bloom, Mark Brodin Oct 2013

Criminal Procedure: The Constitution And The Police, Examples And Explanations, Robert Bloom, Mark Brodin

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Jury Trial In Japan, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Jury Trial In Japan, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Human Rights And Military Decisions: Counterinsurgency And Trends In The Law Of, Dan E. Stigall, Christopher L. Blakesley, Chris Jenks Aug 2013

Human Rights And Military Decisions: Counterinsurgency And Trends In The Law Of, Dan E. Stigall, Christopher L. Blakesley, Chris Jenks

Dan E. Stigall

The past several decades have seen a Copernican shift in the paradigm of armed conflict, which the traditional Law of International Armed Conflict (LOIAC) canon has not fully matched. Standing out in stark relief against the backdrop of relative inactivity in LOIAC, is the surfeit of activity in the field of international human rights law, which has become a dramatic new force in the ancient realm of international law. Human rights law, heretofore not formally part of the traditional juridico-military calculus, has gained ever increasing salience in that calculus. Indeed, human rights law has ramified in such a manner that ...


Mercenary Criminal Justice, Ronald F. Wright, Wayne A. Logan Mar 2013

Mercenary Criminal Justice, Ronald F. Wright, Wayne A. Logan

Ronald F. Wright

Lately, a growing number of bill collectors stand in line to collect on the debt that criminals owe to society. Courts order payment of costs; legislatures levy conviction surcharges; even private, for-profit entities get a piece of the action, collecting fees for probation supervision services and the like. And some of these collectors beckon even before a final bill is due, such as prosecutors who require suspects to pay diversion fees before they file any charges.

Government budgetary cutbacks during the Great Recession have led criminal justice actors to rely on legal financial obligations (LFOs) as a source of revenue ...


Cases On Criminal Procedure, Robert Bloom Dec 2012

Cases On Criminal Procedure, Robert Bloom

Robert M. Bloom

No abstract provided.