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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Course Of Law Cannot Be Stopped': The Aftermath Of The Cumberland Rebellion In The Civil Courts Of Nova Scotia, Jim Phillips, Ernest A. Clarke Oct 1998

The Course Of Law Cannot Be Stopped': The Aftermath Of The Cumberland Rebellion In The Civil Courts Of Nova Scotia, Jim Phillips, Ernest A. Clarke

Dalhousie Law Journal

This article examines a series of cases launched in the Nova Scotia courts following the Cumberland Rebellion of 1776. In these cases loyalists sued former rebels, including those granted amnesty by the authorities, for losses sustained during the rebellion. The article traces the history of the cases and places them in the context of post-rebellion government policy. It argues that such proceedings were without precedent and effectively took the place of official schemes of expropriation of rebel land and compensation to loyalists. It also suggests that the use of civil courts in this way prolonged and exacerbated the social and ...


Collective Violence In Ferryland District, Newfoundland, 1788, Christopher English Oct 1998

Collective Violence In Ferryland District, Newfoundland, 1788, Christopher English

Dalhousie Law Journal

In September 1788 a court found 114 men guilty of riotous assembly in the district of Ferryland the previous winter. This event is remarkable for the number involved (45% of the adult male population of the district); for the number of charges (21% of all civil and criminal actions heard in the district's courts over the next 25 years); for the absence of damage to property; and for the severity of the sentences, which included loss of wages, flogging, transportation and banishment. These proceedings occurred in a community where *the majority (Irish planters, fishermen and apprentices) were socially distinct ...


Copyright Opinions And Aesthetic Theory, Alfred C. Yen Jan 1998

Copyright Opinions And Aesthetic Theory, Alfred C. Yen

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this Article the author contends that judges should be conscious of aesthetics when deciding copyright cases. However, given the inherent ambiguity of aesthetics and the supposedly objective rules and principles that govern judicial opinions, courts implicitly assume a sharp divide between aesthetic reasoning and legal reasoning. Additionally, because aesthetic choices by judges could potentially be deemed government censorship, the two are further considered incompatible. The author argues, however, that this distinction is illusory in that a truly open-minded copyright jurisprudence requires explicit awareness of aesthetics. This argument is supported firstly by a description of four major movements from aesthetic ...


When Is The New York Court Of Appeals Justified In Deviating From Federal Constitutional Interpretation?, Honorable Richard D. Simons Jan 1998

When Is The New York Court Of Appeals Justified In Deviating From Federal Constitutional Interpretation?, Honorable Richard D. Simons

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.