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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

Of Characterization And Other Matters: Thoughts About Multiple Damages, G. Robert Blakey Jul 1997

Of Characterization And Other Matters: Thoughts About Multiple Damages, G. Robert Blakey

Law and Contemporary Problems

Blakey argues that economic analysis in the courts must be substantially supported by other insights, say from ethics or history.


The Origin Of The Appeal In America, Mary Sarah Bilder Jul 1997

The Origin Of The Appeal In America, Mary Sarah Bilder

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The appeal has been treated by academics as a mere legal procedure, possessing no particular significance. Indeed, for many years, legal scholars accepted the influential arguments of Professors Julius Goebel and Roscoe Pound that the appearance of the appeal in early American courts arose either from confusion about English common law legal procedures or was the result of colonial adaptation of English justice-of-the-peace practices. Professor Bilder challenges this conventional explanation of the origin of the appeal by locating the early American colonists within a transatlantic Western European legal culture. Professor Bilder's Article draws on recent work in cultural history ...


Who's Afraid Of Henry Hart?, Michael Wells Apr 1997

Who's Afraid Of Henry Hart?, Michael Wells

Scholarly Works

No law book has enjoyed greater acclaim from distinguished commentators over a sustained period than has Hart & Wechsler's The Federal Courts and the Federal System. Indeed, the praise seems to escalate from one edition to the next. Reviewing the first edition, published forty-three years ago, Philip Kurland called it "the definitive text on the subject of federal jurisdiction." Paul Mishkin added that "the analysis is of an order difficult to match anywhere." In his review of the second edition, published in 1973, Henry Monaghan began by praising the first for having "deservedly achieved a reputation that is extraordinary among ...


Deliberations And Disclosures: A Study Of Post-Verdict Interviews Of Jurors, Nancy S. Marder Feb 1997

Deliberations And Disclosures: A Study Of Post-Verdict Interviews Of Jurors, Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Treasury Regulations And Judicial Deference In The Post-Chevron Era, David A. Brennen Feb 1997

Treasury Regulations And Judicial Deference In The Post-Chevron Era, David A. Brennen

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Analysis of several post-Chevron cases indicates that every major Supreme Court case since 1984 involving the validity of a Treasury regulation is consistent with Chevron. Indeed, since 1984 every challenged Treasury regulation interpreting a statute in which Congress failed to address a specific tax issue has been upheld by the Court. In fact, no Supreme Court case since 1984 could be discovered in which the Court invalidated a Treasury regulation on the grounds that it was an unreasonable interpretation of a statute. Several post-Chevron Supreme

Court decisions, however, rejected the Treasury's application of a tax regulation to ...


Deliberations And Disclosures: A Study Of Post-Verdict Interviews Of Jurors, Nancy S. Marder Jan 1997

Deliberations And Disclosures: A Study Of Post-Verdict Interviews Of Jurors, Nancy S. Marder

Nancy S. Marder

No abstract provided.


Book Review Of The Sourcebook Of Federal Courts, U.S. District And Bankruptcy, James S. Heller Jan 1997

Book Review Of The Sourcebook Of Federal Courts, U.S. District And Bankruptcy, James S. Heller

Library Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Justice In The Wake Of Genocide: The Case Of Rwanda, Madeline Morris Jan 1997

Justice In The Wake Of Genocide: The Case Of Rwanda, Madeline Morris

Faculty Scholarship

During three months in 1994, genocide was committed in Rwanda. Two years after those events, and notwithstanding efforts at both national and international levels to bring the perpetrators to justice, the first case has yet to go to trial. Over the past months, I have worked closely with the government of Rwanda on justice issues in the course of a research project that I am doing on the role of national and international tribunals in the former Yugoslavia, Ethiopia, and Rwanda. I would like to share with you some observations arising from that work. I will examine the approaches to ...


Protecting Human Rights Through A Constitutional Court: The Case Of South Africa, Brice Dickson Jan 1997

Protecting Human Rights Through A Constitutional Court: The Case Of South Africa, Brice Dickson

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Admission Of Dna Evidence In State And Federal Courts, George Bundy Smith, Janet A. Gordon Jan 1997

The Admission Of Dna Evidence In State And Federal Courts, George Bundy Smith, Janet A. Gordon

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


The New York Court Of Appeals: 150 Years, George Bundy Smith Jan 1997

The New York Court Of Appeals: 150 Years, George Bundy Smith

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


Should Federalism Shield Corruption?—Mail Fraud, State Law And Post-Lopez Analysis, George D. Brown Jan 1997

Should Federalism Shield Corruption?—Mail Fraud, State Law And Post-Lopez Analysis, George D. Brown

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this Article, Professor Brown examines the issues that federal prosecutions of state and local officials pose. The analysis focuses on prosecutions under the mail fraud statute and considers the general debate over the proper scope of federal criminal law. Professor Brodin addresses the question of whether a re-examination of mail fraud would focus on constitutional or statutory issues and by utilizing the Supreme Court case United States v. Lopez examines the question of internal limits on the mail fraud statute.


Introduction, Paul F. Campos Jan 1997

Introduction, Paul F. Campos

Articles

No abstract provided.


Exploring The Dark Matter Of Judicial Review: A Constitutional Census Of The 1990s, Seth F. Kreimer Jan 1997

Exploring The Dark Matter Of Judicial Review: A Constitutional Census Of The 1990s, Seth F. Kreimer

Faculty Scholarship

Most debate about the power of judicial review proceeds as if courts primarily invoke the Constitution against the considered judgment of elected legislatures; most constitutional commentary focuses on confrontations between the United States Supreme Court and state or federal legislatures. In fact, the federal courts most often enforce constitutional norms against administrative agencies and street-level bureaucrats, and the norms are enforced not by the Supreme Court but by the federal trial courts. In this Article, Professor Kreimer surveys this "dark matter" of our constitutional universe.

The Article compares the 292 cases involving constitutional claims decided by the Supreme Court during ...


Judicial Fictions: Images Of Supreme Court Justices In The Novel, Drama, And Film, Laura K. Ray Dec 1996

Judicial Fictions: Images Of Supreme Court Justices In The Novel, Drama, And Film, Laura K. Ray

Laura K. Ray

No abstract provided.


Punitive Damages And The Consumerization Of Arbitration, Thomas J. Stipanowich Dec 1996

Punitive Damages And The Consumerization Of Arbitration, Thomas J. Stipanowich

Thomas J. Stipanowich

In this sequel to his 1986 article on punitive damages in arbitration, Professor Stipanowich explores the issues at the heart of the debate over whether punitive or exemplary damages should be available in arbitration between investors and securities brokers and firms. He critiques relevant proposals by the NASD’s Ruder Commission and examines mechanisms for more effectively addressing the punitive damages issue. This article predates and foreshadows the eventual recognition of the authority of securities arbitrators to award punitive damages.