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Full-Text Articles in Law

When Juveniles Face Questioning, Tamar R. Birckhead Nov 2010

When Juveniles Face Questioning, Tamar R. Birckhead

Tamar R Birckhead

This op-ed argues that the age of a suspect should be considered when evaluating whether the questioning was custodial, thereby triggering the right to Miranda warnings.


A Modest Appeal For Decent Respect, Jessica Olive, David C. Gray Sep 2010

A Modest Appeal For Decent Respect, Jessica Olive, David C. Gray

David C. Gray

In Graham v. Florida, the Supreme Court held that the Eighth Amendment prohibits imposing a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of release for nonhomicide crimes if the perpetrator was under the age of eighteen at the time of his offense. In so holding, Justice Kennedy cited foreign and international law to confirm the Court’s independent judgment. In his dissent, Justice Thomas recited now-familiar objections to the Court’s reliance on these sources. Those objections are grounded in his originalist jurisprudence. In this short invited essay, which expands on prior work, we argue that Justice Thomas should ...


A Criminal Justice System That Works, Alan E. Garfield Sep 2010

A Criminal Justice System That Works, Alan E. Garfield

Alan E Garfield

No abstract provided.


The Great American Public, Mass Society, And The New Constitutional Order, Richard C. Boldt Sep 2010

The Great American Public, Mass Society, And The New Constitutional Order, Richard C. Boldt

Richard C. Boldt

No abstract provided.


The Case Of "Death For A Dollar Ninety-Five": Miscarriages Of Justice And Constructions Of American Identity, Mary L. Dudziak May 2010

The Case Of "Death For A Dollar Ninety-Five": Miscarriages Of Justice And Constructions Of American Identity, Mary L. Dudziak

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This is a story about a case long forgotten. It was a case that needed to be forgotten, to safeguard the meaning of American justice. The case of “Death for a Dollar Ninety-Five” began one July night in Marion, Alabama, in 1957, and soon captured the attention of the world. It involved an African American man, a white woman, and the robbery of a small amount of change late in the evening. The conviction was swift and the penalty was death. International criticism soon rained down on the Alabama Governor and the American Secretary of State, leading to clemency and ...


Treason As A State Crime, Thomas Wilson Dorr, Ex Parte Dorr, Dean A. Cantalupo May 2010

Treason As A State Crime, Thomas Wilson Dorr, Ex Parte Dorr, Dean A. Cantalupo

Dean A Cantalupo Esq.

2010 version: For Thomas Wilson Dorr, Treason was a State crime. It is understood by most people that Treason within the United States Constitution is a crime against the national authority, the United States, the Union. Notwithstanding that common understanding, Treason within the United States Constitution is also a State crime, and this is made clear by the plain language of the United States Constitution, as well as many cases of Treason against a State that may be found in the American case reporters. The fundamental textual authority within the Constitution that empowers the United States federal government with legitimate ...


The Moral Limits Of Jurisdiction, Beau James Brock, Harold Leggett Apr 2010

The Moral Limits Of Jurisdiction, Beau James Brock, Harold Leggett

Beau James Brock

As the states and the public face new rules on emissions under the Clean Air Act, the authors find that environmental policy devoid of economic feasibility equals ethical bankruptcy by policymakers to the detriment of all citizens and their economic liberty


Renaissance Of Environmental Criminal Investigation In Louisiana: A Model For The Nation, Beau James Brock, Michael Daniels Mar 2010

Renaissance Of Environmental Criminal Investigation In Louisiana: A Model For The Nation, Beau James Brock, Michael Daniels

Beau James Brock

In Louisiana, perpetrators of knowing criminal violations of the Louisiana Environmental Quality Act, Title 30 subject themselves to felony conduct. Now, that is not just idle words on a page. This law enforcement arm built to preserve the quality of life for every citizen of Louisiana is no longer a paper tiger, but a fightin’ tiger, capable of and willing to investigate in any situation. In the spring of 2008, sustainable programmatic changes in CID were immediately put into place. Some of these included the following: 1) comprehensive overhaul of the then current policies and procedures; 2) the replacement of ...


The Greatest Legal Movie Of All Time: Proclaiming The Real Winner, Grant H. Morris Jan 2010

The Greatest Legal Movie Of All Time: Proclaiming The Real Winner, Grant H. Morris

Grant H Morris

In August, 2008, the ABA Journal featured an article entitled: “The 25 Greatest Legal Movies.” A panel of experts, described in the article as “12 prominent lawyers who teach film or are connected to the business” selected “the best movies ever made about lawyers and the law.” This distinguished panel ranked its twenty-five top legal movies, choosing To Kill a Mockingbird as its number one legal movie. The panel also selected twenty-five films as “honorable mentions,” which were listed in alphabetical order. In my opinion, however, the real greatest legal movie of all time was not selected as the winner ...


Violent Crimes And Known Associates: The Residual Clause Of The Armed Career Criminal Act, David C. Holman Jan 2010

Violent Crimes And Known Associates: The Residual Clause Of The Armed Career Criminal Act, David C. Holman

David Holman

Confusion reigns in federal courts over whether crimes qualify as “violent felonies” for purposes of the Armed Career Criminal Act (ACCA). The ACCA requires a fifteen-year minimum sentence for felons convicted of possessing a firearm who have three prior convictions for violent felonies. Many offenders receive the ACCA’s mandatory minimum sentence of fifteen years based on judges’ guesses that their prior crimes could be committed in a violent manner—instead of based on the statutory crimes of which they were actually convicted. Offenders who do not deserve a minimum sentence of fifteen years may receive it anyway.

The courts ...


The Death Penalty On Trial, Linus Koh Jan 2010

The Death Penalty On Trial, Linus Koh

Linus Koh

No abstract provided.


The Right To Arms In The Living Constitution, David B. Kopel Jan 2010

The Right To Arms In The Living Constitution, David B. Kopel

David B Kopel

This Article presents a brief history of the Second Amendment as part of the living Constitution. From the Early Republic through the present, the American public has always understood the Second Amendment as guaranteeing a right to own firearms for self-defense. That view has been in accordance with élite legal opinion, except for a period in part of the twentieth century.

"Living constitutionalism" should be distinguished from "dead constitutionalism." Under the former, courts looks to objective referents of shared public understanding of constitutional values. Examples of objective referents include state constitutions, as well as federal or state laws to protect ...


State Court Standards Of Review For The Right To Keep And Bear Arms, David B. Kopel, Clayton Cramer Jan 2010

State Court Standards Of Review For The Right To Keep And Bear Arms, David B. Kopel, Clayton Cramer

David B Kopel

Cases on the right to arms in state constitutions can provide useful guidance for courts addressing Second Amendment issues. Although some people have claimed that state courts always use a highly deferential version of "reasonableness," this article shows that many courts have employed rigorous standards, including the tools of strict scrutiny, such as overbreadth, narrow tailoring, and less restrictive means. Courts have also used categoricalism (deciding whether something is inside or outside the right) and narrow construction (to prevent criminal laws from conflicting with the right to arms). Even when formally applying "reasonableness," many courts have used reasonableness as a ...


Can Criminal Law Be Controlled?, Darryl K. Brown Jan 2010

Can Criminal Law Be Controlled?, Darryl K. Brown

Darryl K. Brown

This review of Douglas Husak's 2008 book, Overcriminalization: The Limits of the Criminal Law, summarizes and largely endorses Husak's normative argument about the indefensible expansiveness of much contemporary criminal liability. It then offers a skeptical (or pessimistic) argument about the possibilities for a normative theory such as Husak's to have much effect on criminal justice policy in light of the political barriers to reform.


Should Bush Administration Lawyers Be Prosecuted For Authorizing Torture?, Claire Oakes Finkelstein, Michael Lewis Jan 2010

Should Bush Administration Lawyers Be Prosecuted For Authorizing Torture?, Claire Oakes Finkelstein, Michael Lewis

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The U.N. Security Council Ad Hoc Rwanda Tribunal: International Justice, Or Judicially-Constructed “Victor’S Impunity”?, C. Peter Erlinder Dec 2009

The U.N. Security Council Ad Hoc Rwanda Tribunal: International Justice, Or Judicially-Constructed “Victor’S Impunity”?, C. Peter Erlinder

C. Peter Erlinder

ABSTRACT The U.N. Security Council Ad Hoc Rwanda Tribunal: International Justice, or Juridically-Constructed “Victor’s Impunity”? Prof. Peter Erlinder [1] ________________________ “…if the Japanese had won the war, those of us who planned the fire-bombing of Tokyo would have been the war criminals….” [2] Robert S. McNamara, U.S. Secretary of State “…and so it goes…” [3] Billy Pilgrim (alter ego of an American prisoner of war, held in the cellar of a Dresden abattoir, who survived firebombing by his own troops, author Kurt Vonnegut Jr.) Introduction Unlike the postWW- II Tribunals, the U.N. Security Council tribunals for ...


“Intelligence” Searches And Purpose: A Significant Mismatch Between Constitutional Criminal Procedure And The Law Of Intelligence-Gathering, Robert C. Power Dec 2009

“Intelligence” Searches And Purpose: A Significant Mismatch Between Constitutional Criminal Procedure And The Law Of Intelligence-Gathering, Robert C. Power

Robert C. Power

No abstract provided.