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Constitutional Law

2010

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 505

Full-Text Articles in Law

Foreword - In Memory Of Robert J. Lipkin, James May, Erin Daly, Robert Hayman Feb 2011

Foreword - In Memory Of Robert J. Lipkin, James May, Erin Daly, Robert Hayman

Robert L. Hayman

This is a foreword to a compendium of writings by our lost friend and colleague, Bobby Lipkin, collected within a special issue of the Widener Law Review. Bobby’s constitutionalism beholds and celebrates that "no constitutional truths emanate from either politically unaccountable" courts or from paradigmatically imperfect constitutional legal theories. Rather, Bobby’s constitutionalism was participatory and justificatory: it derives from the Constitution’s republican democracy. The Constitution means what We the People allow it to mean at constitutional inflection points in our nation’s history. We miss Bobby dearly.


Foreword - In Memory Of Robert J. Lipkin, James May, Erin Daly, Robert Hayman Feb 2011

Foreword - In Memory Of Robert J. Lipkin, James May, Erin Daly, Robert Hayman

Erin Daly

This is a foreword to a compendium of writings by our lost friend and colleague, Bobby Lipkin, collected within a special issue of the Widener Law Review. Bobby’s constitutionalism beholds and celebrates that "no constitutional truths emanate from either politically unaccountable" courts or from paradigmatically imperfect constitutional legal theories. Rather, Bobby’s constitutionalism was participatory and justificatory: it derives from the Constitution’s republican democracy. The Constitution means what We the People allow it to mean at constitutional inflection points in our nation’s history. We miss Bobby dearly.


Eminent Need: Proposing A Market Participation Exception For Municipal Parker Immunity, Scott B. Weese Dec 2010

Eminent Need: Proposing A Market Participation Exception For Municipal Parker Immunity, Scott B. Weese

Scott B Weese

A township is using its eminent domain powers to become a monopsony in the real estate market for the designated area. That township’s monopsony power is then being exploited to create a price-fixing scheme that would violate antitrust laws, either as a per se violation under § 1 of the Sherman Antitrust Act, or as a monopolizing or attempted monopolizing offense under § 2. Under the Sherman Act, effected residents could force the township to appraise each property individually and pay the full market value; if the township refused, they would be subject to the treble damage penalty, erasing any possible ...


Civil Rights Developments, Martin A. Schwartz Dec 2010

Civil Rights Developments, Martin A. Schwartz

Martin A. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


Civil Rights In Transition: Sections 1981 And 1982 Cover Discrimination On The Basis Of Ancestry And Ethnicity, Eileen R. Kaufman, Martin A. Schwartz Dec 2010

Civil Rights In Transition: Sections 1981 And 1982 Cover Discrimination On The Basis Of Ancestry And Ethnicity, Eileen R. Kaufman, Martin A. Schwartz

Martin A. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


Civil Rights Developments, Martin A. Schwartz Dec 2010

Civil Rights Developments, Martin A. Schwartz

Martin A. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


The Senate Filibuster: The Politics Of Destruction, Emmet J. Bondurant Dec 2010

The Senate Filibuster: The Politics Of Destruction, Emmet J. Bondurant

Emmet J Bondurant

The notion that the Framers of the Constitution intended to allow a minority in the U.S. Senate to exercise a veto power over legislation and presidential appointments is not only profoundly undemocratic, it is also a myth. The overwhelming trend of law review articles have assumed that because the Constitution grants to each house the power to make its own rules, the Senate filibuster rule is immune from constitutional attack. This Article takes an opposite position based on the often overlooked history of the filibuster, the text of the Constitution and the relevant court precedents which demonstrate that the ...


Civil Rights In Transition: Sections 1981 And 1982 Cover Discrimination On The Basis Of Ancestry And Ethnicity, Eileen R. Kaufman, Martin A. Schwartz Dec 2010

Civil Rights In Transition: Sections 1981 And 1982 Cover Discrimination On The Basis Of Ancestry And Ethnicity, Eileen R. Kaufman, Martin A. Schwartz

Martin A. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


Civil Rights In Transition: Sections 1981 And 1982 Cover Discrimination On The Basis Of Ancestry And Ethnicity, Eileen R. Kaufman, Martin A. Schwartz Dec 2010

Civil Rights In Transition: Sections 1981 And 1982 Cover Discrimination On The Basis Of Ancestry And Ethnicity, Eileen R. Kaufman, Martin A. Schwartz

Eileen Kaufman

No abstract provided.


Why Wait Until The Crime Happens? Providing For The Involuntary Commitment Of Dangerous Individuals Without Requiring A Showing Of Mental Illness, Adam Lamparello Dec 2010

Why Wait Until The Crime Happens? Providing For The Involuntary Commitment Of Dangerous Individuals Without Requiring A Showing Of Mental Illness, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

No abstract provided.


Case Note: Nabozny V. Podlesny, William B. Turner Dec 2010

Case Note: Nabozny V. Podlesny, William B. Turner

William B Turner

This case note describes and provides context for the 1996 opinion in Nabozny v. Podlesny, in which the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a district judge's grant of summary judgment to defendants in a suit by a former student who complained of years of severe bullying and harassment by his peers because of his sexual orientation, which school administrators persistently failed to take steps to stop.


In Efforts To Regulate Immigration, States Test Limits Of Their Authority, Alan E. Garfield Dec 2010

In Efforts To Regulate Immigration, States Test Limits Of Their Authority, Alan E. Garfield

Alan E Garfield

No abstract provided.


Thurgood Marshall, The Race Man, And Gender Equality In The Courts, Taunya Banks Dec 2010

Thurgood Marshall, The Race Man, And Gender Equality In The Courts, Taunya Banks

Taunya Lovell Banks

Renowned civil rights advocate and race man Thurgood Marshall came of age as a lawyer during the black protest movement in the 1930s. He represented civil rights protesters, albeit reluctantly, but was ambivalent about post-Brown mass protests. Although Marshall recognized law's limitations, he felt more comfortable using litigation as a tool for social change. His experiences as a legal advocate for racial equality influenced his thinking as a judge. Marshall joined the United States Supreme Court in 1967, as dramatic advancement of black civil rights through litigation waned. Other social movements, notably the women's rights movement, took its ...


Dodging A Bullet: Mcdonald V. City Of Chicago And The Limits Of Progressive Originalism, Dale E. Ho Dec 2010

Dodging A Bullet: Mcdonald V. City Of Chicago And The Limits Of Progressive Originalism, Dale E. Ho

Dale E Ho

The Supreme Court’s decision in last term’s gun rights case, McDonald v. City of Chicago, punctured the conventional wisdom after District of Columbia v. Heller that “we are all originalists now.” Surprisingly, many progressive academics were disappointed. For “progressive originalists,” McDonald was a missed opportunity to overrule the Slaughter-House Cases and to revitalize the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In their view, such a ruling could have realigned progressive constitutional achievements with originalism and relieved progressives of the albatross of substantive due process, while also unlocking long-dormant constitutional text to serve as the source of ...


Junior Bar Law Review 1 (2010), 21-40 Judicial Activism Revisited: Reflecting On The Role Of Judges In Enforcing Economic, Social And Cultural Rights, Gehan D. Gunatilleke Mr. Dec 2010

Junior Bar Law Review 1 (2010), 21-40 Judicial Activism Revisited: Reflecting On The Role Of Judges In Enforcing Economic, Social And Cultural Rights, Gehan D. Gunatilleke Mr.

Gehan D Gunatilleke Mr.

Following the conclusion of military operations in Sri Lanka in 2009, the issue of economic development and distributive justice appears to have remerged on the country’s agenda. Within this post-conflict context, the judiciary in Sri Lanka is confronted with a major challenge in terms of defining its proper role in the promotion of Economic Social and Cultural (“ESC”) rights. The precise extent to which judges should be ‘activist’ in promoting these rights should be contrasted with the level of activism required of judges in the sphere of civil and political rights. Advocating ESC rights in Sri Lanka simply cannot ...


Twombly In Context: Why Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 4(B) Is Unconstitutional, E. Donald Elliott Dec 2010

Twombly In Context: Why Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 4(B) Is Unconstitutional, E. Donald Elliott

Faculty Scholarship Series

Rule 4(b) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure delegates to private parties state authority to compel a person to appear and answer civil charges in court without any preliminary state review or screening for reasonableness. This is argued to be unconstitutional as a unreasonable seizure of the person, a deprivation of private property without due process, and a standardless delegation of state power to a private party with a financial interest.

The history of the writ of summons is reviewed. From the Founding until 1938, federal courts reviewed the grounds proposed for suit prior to service of a ...


A Comment On Costs In Constitutional Cases, Iain Field Nov 2010

A Comment On Costs In Constitutional Cases, Iain Field

Iain Field

Professor Patrick Keyzer and Stephen Lloyd SC are both well qualified to speak to the legal principles that govern the determination of costs in constitutional cases, and I am, with respect, happy to accept their combined review of these principles. I do not think that there are any significant disagreements between them in this regard. They have, nevertheless, provided us with two usefully distinct perspectives on the topic, and offered two contrasting views as to the need for special costs rules in constitutional cases. I have only a small number of observations (perhaps it is better to say questions), which ...


Lawmakers As Lawbreakers, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov Nov 2010

Lawmakers As Lawbreakers, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

Dr. Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

How would Congress act in a world without judicial review? Canlawmakers be trusted to police themselves? This Article examinesCongress’s capacity and incentives to enforce upon itself “the law ofcongressional lawmaking”—a largely overlooked body of law that iscompletely insulated from judicial enforcement. The Article exploresthe political safeguards that may motivate lawmakers to engage inself-policing and rule-following behavior. It identifies the majorpolitical safeguards that can be garnered from the relevant legal,political science, political economy, and social psychology scholarship,and evaluates each safeguard by drawing on a combination oftheoretical, empirical, and descriptive studies about Congress. TheArticle’s main argument is ...


George Washington And The Executive Power, John C. Yoo Nov 2010

George Washington And The Executive Power, John C. Yoo

John C Yoo

This paper examines current debates over the scope of presidential power through the lens of the Washington administration. We tend to treat Washington’s decisions with an air of inevitability, but the constitutional text left more questions about the executive unanswered than answered. Washington filled these gaps with a number of foundational decisions - several on a par with those made during the writing and ratification of the Constitution itself. He was a republican before he was a Federalist, but ultimately Washington favored an energetic, independent executive, even at the cost of political harmony. He centralized decision-making in his office, so ...


When Juveniles Face Questioning, Tamar R. Birckhead Nov 2010

When Juveniles Face Questioning, Tamar R. Birckhead

Tamar R Birckhead

This op-ed argues that the age of a suspect should be considered when evaluating whether the questioning was custodial, thereby triggering the right to Miranda warnings.


The Wisdom Of Solomon: Why We Can't Split The Pre-Embryo, Bridget M. Fuselier Nov 2010

The Wisdom Of Solomon: Why We Can't Split The Pre-Embryo, Bridget M. Fuselier

Bridget M Fuselier

Due to the fact that there are at least 500,000 cryo-preserved pre-embryos and a very small amount of common law or statutes to provide guidance, legislators need to act and take steps to guide the people impacted by these problems.

This article promotes modifications to property concepts that protects the special dignity of the pre-embryo while also recognizing the autonomy of the individual gamete providers. The article proposes a form of ownership that would prevent the pre-embryos from passing through wills and by intestate succession. It would also eliminate the possibility of ending up with a multitude of owners ...


Models Of Religious Freedom, Marcel Stuessi Swiss Human Rights Lawyer Nov 2010

Models Of Religious Freedom, Marcel Stuessi Swiss Human Rights Lawyer

Marcel Stüssi

MODELS OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

The Swiss, US American, and Syrian models are in this thesis illustrated by way of three representations. The Analytical Representation comprises more than statements of posi-tive law or mechanical comparison. Each chapter is introduced by thought-forms predominant in the respective legal culture. The objective of the Methodological Representation is to investigate the logic and legitimate pattern by which the Swiss and US American judiciary meth-odologically come to the conclusion that an alleged governmental inter-ference is covered under the right to religious freedom. The last dimen-sion, which is the Eclectic Representation, pursues a dual aim. Firstly, the ...


Standing In The Age Of Citizen Revolt: Legislative Standing, Direct Democracy, And The Supreme Court, Frank M. Dickerson Iii, Reid M. Bolton Nov 2010

Standing In The Age Of Citizen Revolt: Legislative Standing, Direct Democracy, And The Supreme Court, Frank M. Dickerson Iii, Reid M. Bolton

Frank M. Dickerson III

One of the most interesting questions raised by California’s Proposition 8 is the question of standing for ballot-initiative supporters in defensive litigation. This Article addresses the question raised in the Proposition 8 case and the issue of standing for ballot initiative supporters to defend their initiative on appeal more generally. It suggests that such standing for ballot-initiative sponsors is consistent with both prior Supreme Court precedent and the Constitutional and prudential concerns underlying the doctrine of standing.


Exceptions: The Criminal Law's Illogical Approach To Hiv-Related Aggravated Assaults, Ari E. Waldman Nov 2010

Exceptions: The Criminal Law's Illogical Approach To Hiv-Related Aggravated Assaults, Ari E. Waldman

Ari E Waldman

This article identifies logical and due process errors in cases involving HIV-related aggravated assaults, which usually involve an HIV-positive individual having unprotected sex without disclosing his or her HIV status. While this behavior should not be encouraged, this paper suggests that punishing this conduct through a charge of aggravated assault – which requires a showing that the defendant’s actions were a means likely to cause grievous bodily harm or death – is fraught with fallacies in reasoning and runs afoul of due process. Specifically, some courts use the rule of thumb that HIV can possibly be transmitted through bodily fluids as ...


Justice Kennedy's Most Important Constitutional Opinions, Randall Kelso, Charles Kelso Nov 2010

Justice Kennedy's Most Important Constitutional Opinions, Randall Kelso, Charles Kelso

Randall Kelso

Abstract for Kelso & Kelso, Justice Kennedy’s Most Important Constitutional Opinions In this article, we have undertaken to evaluate Justice Kennedy’s majority, concurring, and dissenting opinions in terms of their importance for society and the law. We have found no single criteria by which to assess importance. Instead, we have used a balancing system whose elements are: (1) how many people are likely to be affected over time; (2) how important are the competing interests to individuals, society, or government; (3) how much impact is the opinion likely to have on the development of constitutional law; and (4) what effect the opinion is likely to have on the role of the Court in American legal history. We discuss Justice Kennedy’s “Top Ten” majority opinions, his “Top Ten” concurring opinions, and his “Top 4” dissenting opinions. In addition, an Appendix is attached to the Article listing 38 other majority opinions, 25 concurrences, and 13 dissents written by Justice Kennedy which are also noteworthy Kennedy opinions.


Wine Retailers Lobby To Put A Cork In Discriminatory State Liquor Laws And Proposed Care Act, Marissa Prosky Nov 2010

Wine Retailers Lobby To Put A Cork In Discriminatory State Liquor Laws And Proposed Care Act, Marissa Prosky

Marissa Prosky

Because the wine production and distribution industries have substantially expanded with the introduction of online wine sales, the impact of the CARE Act on the industries would be devastating. The history of liquor legislation has progressed from the nation’s initial laws enacted prior to prohibition, to the Supreme Court’s interpretation of state liquor laws after the Eighteenth and Twenty-First Amendments, and most recently the Supreme Court’s decision on state liquor laws in Heald. Several lower courts have shown difficulty in applying the Supreme Court’s Heald decision. Congress has taken action to resolve the confusion in applying ...


Staring Down The Sights At Mcdonald V. City Of Chicago: Why The Second Amendment Deserves The Kevlar Protection Of Strict Scrutiny, James J. Williamson Ii Nov 2010

Staring Down The Sights At Mcdonald V. City Of Chicago: Why The Second Amendment Deserves The Kevlar Protection Of Strict Scrutiny, James J. Williamson Ii

James J. Williamson II

In District of Columbia v. Heller, the Supreme Court found that a federal law that restricted the possession of handguns within a federal enclave to be in direct conflict with the Second Amendment, and therefore, unconstitutional. Two years after that decision, the Supreme Court, in McDonald v. City of Chicago, held that the Second Amendment is applicable to the States through the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In both cases, however, the High Court failed to articulate a standard of review by which future Second Amendment challenges should be adjudicated. This note argues that the appropriate standard of ...


Constitutional Law, James E. Leahy Nov 2010

Constitutional Law, James E. Leahy

Cal Law Trends and Developments

This was a year in which the reviewing courts in California were confronted with contemporary problems of constitutional law.


Constitutional Law, James E. Leahy Nov 2010

Constitutional Law, James E. Leahy

Cal Law Trends and Developments

This was an eventful year in the field of constitutional law. The court upheld the right of individuals to distribute antiwar literature within a railway station, struck down an injunction prohibiting county employees from peaceful picketing, upheld an ordinance punishing conduct which urges a riot or which urges others to commit acts of force or violence, and held the California loyalty oath unconstitutional.


Don't Be So Quick To Ban Violent Videogames, Alan E. Garfield Nov 2010

Don't Be So Quick To Ban Violent Videogames, Alan E. Garfield

Alan E Garfield

No abstract provided.