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Full-Text Articles in Law

Does The Second Amendment Protect Firearms Commerce?, David B. Kopel Apr 2104

Does The Second Amendment Protect Firearms Commerce?, David B. Kopel

David B Kopel

The Second Amendment protects the operation of businesses which provide Second Amendment services, including gun stores. Although lower federal courts have split on the issue, the right of firearms commerce is demonstrated by the original history of the Second Amendment, confirmed by the Supreme Court in District of Columbia v. Heller, and consistent with the Court's precedents on other individual rights.


Balancing Religious Liberty And Anti-Discrimination Interests In The Public Employment Context: The Impact Of Masterpiece Cakeshop And American Legion, Brenda M. Bauges Jan 2020

Balancing Religious Liberty And Anti-Discrimination Interests In The Public Employment Context: The Impact Of Masterpiece Cakeshop And American Legion, Brenda M. Bauges

Faculty Scholarship

At the heart of national debate in recent years is the balance between religious liberty and anti-discrimination interests. The Supreme Court’s recent Free Speech and Establishment Clause decisions in Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, 138 S. Ct. 1719 (2018) and American Legion v. American Humanist Association, 139 S. Ct. 2067 (2019) push the pendulum in this debate towards greater protection of religious liberties, and signal the Court’s preference for context-specific tests for how the Establishment Clause will interact with the broader range of interests protected by the Free Exercise Clause. These cases are especially significant ...


Accommodating Competition: Harmonizing National Constitutional And Antitrust Commitments, Jonathan B. Baker Oct 2019

Accommodating Competition: Harmonizing National Constitutional And Antitrust Commitments, Jonathan B. Baker

Jonathan B. Baker

This Article shows how the norm supporting governmental action to protect and foster competitive markets was harmonized with economic rights to contract and property during the 19th century, and with the development of the social safety net during the 20th century. It explains why the Constitution, as understood today, does not check the erosion of the entrenched but threatened national commitment to assuring competitive markets.


A Modest Proposal On Supreme Court Unanimity To Constitutionally Invalidate Laws, Dwight G. Duncan Oct 2019

A Modest Proposal On Supreme Court Unanimity To Constitutionally Invalidate Laws, Dwight G. Duncan

Faculty Publications

There is a problem in our constitutional history: the problem of split Supreme Court decisions invalidating democratically enacted laws. From Dred Scott[1] to Lochner[2] to Roe v. Wade[3] to Citizens United,[4] and even the recent Second Amendment decisions of Heller[5] and McDonald,[6] these patently fallible decisions on controversial political and social issues have divided the nation, politicized the Court, poisoned the Supreme Court nomination process and thwarted the political branches and democratic governance. Requiring Supreme Court unanimity to overturn legislation on constitutional grounds would therefore be morally and politically desirable. Why that is so ...


The Post-Truth First Amendment, Sarah Haan Oct 2019

The Post-Truth First Amendment, Sarah Haan

Indiana Law Journal

Post-truthism is widely viewed as a political problem. This Article explores posttruthism as a constitutional law problem, and argues that, because post-truthism offers a normative framework for regulating information, we should take it seriously as a basis for law.

In its exploration of the influence of post-truth ideas on law, the Article focuses on the compelled speech doctrine. When the State mandates disclosure, it pits the interests of unwilling speakers against the interests of listeners. In the twenty-first century, speakers who are targeted by mandatory disclosure laws are often organizational actors with informational advantages, such as corporations. Listeners who stand ...


The Law: Defending Congress’S Interests In Court: How Lawmakers And The President Bargain Over Department Of Justice Representation, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Law: Defending Congress’S Interests In Court: How Lawmakers And The President Bargain Over Department Of Justice Representation, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

In understanding the willingness of government lawyers to defend the constitutionality of federal statutes, this article will explain why presidents rarely make use of their powers under the Constitution (allowing the president to refuse to defend laws he finds unconstitutional) and under federal law (placing the control of most government litigation with the attorney general). Attention will be paid both to how Department of Justice lawyers enhance their power by defending federal statutes and to how Congress, if need be, can pressure the department to bow to lawmaker preferences. In consequence, when the president refuses to defend a statute, courts ...


Where's The Politics?: Introduction To Williams, Eastland, Days, And Rabkin, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Where's The Politics?: Introduction To Williams, Eastland, Days, And Rabkin, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Tom Delay: Popular Constitutionalist?, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Tom Delay: Popular Constitutionalist?, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Interactive Constitution: An Essay On Clothing Emperors And Searching For Constitutional Truth, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Interactive Constitution: An Essay On Clothing Emperors And Searching For Constitutional Truth, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Last Word Debate: How Social And Political Forces Shape Constitutional Values, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Last Word Debate: How Social And Political Forces Shape Constitutional Values, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Indefensible Duty To Defend, Neal Devins, Saikrishna B. Prakash Sep 2019

The Indefensible Duty To Defend, Neal Devins, Saikrishna B. Prakash

Neal E. Devins

Modern Justice Department opinions insist that the executive branch must enforce and defend laws. In the first article to systematically examine Department of Justice refusals to defend, we make four points. First, the duties to enforce and defend lack any sound basis in the Constitution. Hence, while President Obama is right to refuse to defend the Defense of Marriage Act, he is wrong to continue to enforce a law he believes is unconstitutional. Second, rather than being grounded in the Constitution, the duties are better explained by the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) desire to enhance its independence and status ...


The Constitution Between Friends, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Constitution Between Friends, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Academic Expert Before Congress: Observations And Lessons From Bill Van Alstyne's Testimony, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Academic Expert Before Congress: Observations And Lessons From Bill Van Alstyne's Testimony, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Same-Sex Marriage And The New Judicial Federalism: Why State Courts Should Not Consider Out-Of-State Backlash, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Same-Sex Marriage And The New Judicial Federalism: Why State Courts Should Not Consider Out-Of-State Backlash, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Tiers Of Scrutiny In A Hierarchical Judiciary, Tara Leigh Grove Sep 2019

Tiers Of Scrutiny In A Hierarchical Judiciary, Tara Leigh Grove

Tara L. Grove

No abstract provided.


The Supreme Court's Legitimacy Dilemma, Tara Leigh Grove Sep 2019

The Supreme Court's Legitimacy Dilemma, Tara Leigh Grove

Tara L. Grove

No abstract provided.


Takings Clause, Tara Leigh Grove Sep 2019

Takings Clause, Tara Leigh Grove

Tara L. Grove

No abstract provided.


Government Standing And The Fallacy Of Institutional Injury, Tara Leigh Grove Sep 2019

Government Standing And The Fallacy Of Institutional Injury, Tara Leigh Grove

Tara L. Grove

A new brand of plaintiff has come to federal court. In cases involving the Affordable Care Act, the Defense of Marriage Act, and partisan gerrymandering, government institutions have brought suit to redress “institutional injuries”—that is, claims of harm to their constitutional powers or duties. Jurists and scholars are increasingly enthusiastic about these lawsuits, arguing (for example) that the Senate should have standing to protect its power to ratify treaties; that the House of Representatives may sue to preserve its role in the appropriations process; and that the President may go to court to vindicate his Article II prerogatives. This ...


Article Iii In The Political Branches, Tara Leigh Grove Sep 2019

Article Iii In The Political Branches, Tara Leigh Grove

Tara L. Grove

In many separation of powers debates, scholars excavate the practices and constitutional interpretations of Congress and the executive branch in order to discern the scope of various constitutional provisions. I argue that similar attention to political branch practice is warranted in the Article III context. That is true, in large part because much of the constitutional history of the federal courts has been written not by the federal judiciary, but by the legislative and executive branches. To illustrate this point, this Essay focuses on the Exceptions Clause of Article III. The Supreme Court has said little about the meaning of ...


Congress's (Limited) Power To Represent Itself In Court, Tara Leigh Grove, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Congress's (Limited) Power To Represent Itself In Court, Tara Leigh Grove, Neal Devins

Tara L. Grove

Scholars and jurists have long assumed that, when the executive branch declines to defend a federal statute, Congress may intervene in federal court to defend the law. When invalidating the Defense of Marriage Act, for example, no Supreme Court Justice challenged the authority of the House of Representatives to defend federal laws in at least some circumstances. At the same time, in recent litigation over the Fast and Furious gun-running case, the Department of Justice asserted that the House could not go to court to enforce a subpoena against the executive. In this Article, we seek to challenge both claims ...


Trans-Border Exclusion And Execution, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

Trans-Border Exclusion And Execution, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


The Sanctity Of Polling Places, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

The Sanctity Of Polling Places, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


The First Amendment And The World, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

The First Amendment And The World, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


Property As/And Constitutional Settlement, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

Property As/And Constitutional Settlement, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


Our Exceptional Constitution, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

Our Exceptional Constitution, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


Be It Resolved . . ., Timothy Zick Sep 2019

Be It Resolved . . ., Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


An Anthem For Ows?, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

An Anthem For Ows?, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


Property's Constitution, James Y. Stern Sep 2019

Property's Constitution, James Y. Stern

James Y. Stern

Long-standing disagreements over the definition of property as a matter of legal theory present a special problem in constitutional law. The Due Process and Takings Clauses establish individual rights that can be asserted only if “property” is at stake. Yet the leading cases interpreting constitutional property doctrines have never managed to articulate a coherent general view of property, and in some instances have reached opposite conclusions about its meaning. Most notably, government benefits provided in the form of individual legal entitlements are considered “property” for purposes of due process but not takings doctrines, a conflict the cases acknowledge but do ...


Washington Supreme Court Upholds State Anti-Spamming Law, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Washington Supreme Court Upholds State Anti-Spamming Law, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


Balanced Budget Amendment Is Dangerous Gimmick, Not Solution, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Balanced Budget Amendment Is Dangerous Gimmick, Not Solution, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.