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Constitutional Law

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"Sociological Legitimacy" In Supreme Court Opinions, Michael Wells Jul 2007

"Sociological Legitimacy" In Supreme Court Opinions, Michael Wells

Scholarly Works

Analysis of a Supreme Court opinion ordinarily begins from the premise that the opinion is a transparent window into the Court's thinking, such that the reasons offered by the Court are, or ought to be, the reasons that account for the holding. Scholars debate the strength of the Court's reasoning, question or defend the Court's candor, and propose alternative ways of justifying the ruling. This Article takes issue with the transparency premise, on both descriptive and normative grounds. Especially in controversial cases, the Court is at least as much concerned with presenting its holding in a way ...


Experimenting With The "Right To Die" In The Laboratory Of The States, Thomas A. Eaton, Edward J. Larson Jul 1991

Experimenting With The "Right To Die" In The Laboratory Of The States, Thomas A. Eaton, Edward J. Larson

Scholarly Works

The purposes of this Article are twofold. Our first purpose is to reexamine the legal foundations of a patient's right to refuse treatment. The Court's equivocal handling of the federal constitutional issues in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health invites a closer look at state constitutional, statutory and common law. The source of the underlying right will affect state experimentation with substantive and procedural rules in this area. Our second purpose is to describe the current status of the states' experiments with the right to die. That is, we elaborate in more detail on the state constitutional ...


A Bicentennial Symposium--The Constitution And Human Values: The Unfinished Agenda, Milner S. Ball Jul 1986

A Bicentennial Symposium--The Constitution And Human Values: The Unfinished Agenda, Milner S. Ball

Scholarly Works

The participants in this Symposium share a commitment to explore the question whether law--constitutional law in particular--is one of the humanities and therefore subject to understanding, critique, conceptualization, and practice in freshly humanizing modes. These authors--lawyers, poets, philosophers, writers, activists--make no great claims for their individuals labors or their shared enterprise. They prefer instead to let the work speak for itself.