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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Senate Filibuster: The Politics Of Destruction, Emmet J. Bondurant Dec 2010

The Senate Filibuster: The Politics Of Destruction, Emmet J. Bondurant

Emmet J Bondurant

The notion that the Framers of the Constitution intended to allow a minority in the U.S. Senate to exercise a veto power over legislation and presidential appointments is not only profoundly undemocratic, it is also a myth. The overwhelming trend of law review articles have assumed that because the Constitution grants to each house the power to make its own rules, the Senate filibuster rule is immune from constitutional attack. This Article takes an opposite position based on the often overlooked history of the filibuster, the text of the Constitution and the relevant court precedents which demonstrate that the ...


Assessing The Applicability Of The Business Judgment Rule And The “Defensive” Business Judgment Rule In The Chinese Judiciary: A Perspective On Takeover Dispute Adjudication, Xiao-Chuan Charlie Weng Dec 2010

Assessing The Applicability Of The Business Judgment Rule And The “Defensive” Business Judgment Rule In The Chinese Judiciary: A Perspective On Takeover Dispute Adjudication, Xiao-Chuan Charlie Weng

Xiao-chuan Charlie Weng

With the surge of takeovers in China, many issues regarding takeover adjudication and legislation have increasingly received academic attention. The issues of the independence and professionalization of the judiciary and the scarcity of legislation on duty of care are the major predicaments facing corporate China. Massive legislative and judicial reform of takeover adjudication is not viable in the near future. However, U.S. common law standards of review, including the business judgment rule and serial rules against hostile takeover, with diacritical the business judgment rule stamp, may hold potential for reform within the current economic environment. The article investigates the ...


Home Sweet Homestead? Not If You Are Subject To A Mandatory Homeowners' Association!, Bridget M. Fuselier Nov 2010

Home Sweet Homestead? Not If You Are Subject To A Mandatory Homeowners' Association!, Bridget M. Fuselier

Bridget M Fuselier

While Texas homestead law has provided a great degree of protection for homeowners in the past, the rising power of the Homeowners' or Property Owners' Association is placing that protection in jeopardy. Over the past 20 years, associations have grown in number and power. Currently homestead property may be foreclosed on in a non-judicial foreclosure process for non-payment of HOA dues despite the fact that is not one of the liens constitutionally permissible to attach to homestead property. This problem must be remedied, especially in light of stories such as that of Captain Clauer who had his $300,000 home ...


Down The Rabbit Hole: The Madness Of State Film Incentives As As "Solution" To Runaway Production, Adrian H. Mcdonald Nov 2010

Down The Rabbit Hole: The Madness Of State Film Incentives As As "Solution" To Runaway Production, Adrian H. Mcdonald

Adrian H. McDonald

This working paper is a "sequel" to my first law review article on runaway productions called "Through the Looking Glass": Runaway Productions and "Hollywood Economics," published in The University of Pennsylvania Journal of Labor and Employment Law in August 2007.

Since 2007, there has been a race to the bottom as virtually every state has enacted significant, if not detrimentally generous, tax incentives to lure film and television production. The efficacy of these incentives is evaluated at length, with particular attention paid to the origin and implementation of tax incentives in California, Massachusetts and Louisiana - states with colorful backgrounds on ...


Three Suggestions For The Texas Limited Liability Company Law, Val D. Ricks Nov 2010

Three Suggestions For The Texas Limited Liability Company Law, Val D. Ricks

Val D. Ricks

Since I began asking my students to study the Texas Business Organizations Code, I have encountered several provisions that are difficult to explain. In this article, I address the three most bothersome such provisions in the code applicable to limited liability companies: (1) The statute addressing “Transactions Involving Interested Governing Persons” actually does not address such transactions. (2) The statute applicable to agents of limited liability companies overturns nearly the entire common law of agency and leaves us with uncertainty. (3) Against the explicit provisions of the Code, legislative history, and another provision making it almost impossible procedurally, courts apply ...


A Description Of An Individual's Shared Responsibility Requirement In The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act Of 2010, James S. Cole Oct 2010

A Description Of An Individual's Shared Responsibility Requirement In The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act Of 2010, James S. Cole

James S Cole

The individual responsibility requirement of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 has become the focus of litigation and public policy debates. Surprising aspects of the statute emerge when its rather dense verbiage is analyzed. The “individual conscience exception” applies primarily, if not exclusively, to self-employed Amish individuals who renounce Social Security coverage in its entirety. Conscientious objections to other aspects of the statute are not acknowledged. A taxpayer is assessed a penalty for his own failure to obtain minimum necessary health coverage beginning in 2014 and also for dependents’ penalties. The dependents are also liable for their ...


Can The Federal Reserve Adopt An Inflation Targeting Regime Under The Current Statutory Arrangements?, Hong Kyoon Cho Oct 2010

Can The Federal Reserve Adopt An Inflation Targeting Regime Under The Current Statutory Arrangements?, Hong Kyoon Cho

Hong Kyoon Cho

This paper discussed legal perspectives in institutional framework of central banking, keyed to monetary policy framework. The statutory objectives of monetary policy provide an environment under which the central bank can design its monetary policy framework, in that the choice of the monetary policy framework could lie within the scope of the spirits embodied in the statutory objectives of monetary policy. Monetary policy framework could illuminate legal aspects of debate, as specifically seen in the Federal Reserve’s case that has adopted not an explicit but an implicit monetary policy framework, namely the Just-Do-It approach. Under the current legal mandate ...


Off The Roads & Out Of The Courts: Enter A Technology Fix For Drunk Driving, Nora J. Pasman-Green Oct 2010

Off The Roads & Out Of The Courts: Enter A Technology Fix For Drunk Driving, Nora J. Pasman-Green

Nora J. Pasman-Green

More than 1.4 million people are arrested annually for drunk driving, a crime that results in over 10,000 fatalities, more than 225,000 non-fatal injuries, and economic costs exceeding $50 billion. Drunk driving has become a major public health problem. This article traces development of the technology – the alcohol ignition interlock – which prevents drunk drivers from operating their vehicles. Ongoing research is underway to equip new automobiles with alcohol detection devices as standard equipment. The article explores the possibility of eliminating drunk driving once all vehicles are manufactured with pre-market interlocks installed. The article examines the impact of ...


Understanding The Medical Record In Shoulder Dystocia Cases. Why These Cases Sometimes Should Have A No-Fault Recovery, Paul A. Race Oct 2010

Understanding The Medical Record In Shoulder Dystocia Cases. Why These Cases Sometimes Should Have A No-Fault Recovery, Paul A. Race

Paul A Race

Shoulder dystocia is one of the most common causes of litigation in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The most common serious complication from shoulder dystocia is brachial plexus injury although death of the baby can also occur. Brachial plexus injuries lead to paralysis of the arm of the neonate. While most of the injuries eventually resolve, a small percentage will remain permanent. This article explores the areas of litigation involved with brachial plexus injuries. It discusses what the attorney should look for in the medical record. It reviews the standard of care both pre-labor and post-labor. It also looks at the controversial ...


Executive Compensation: The Law And Incentives, Stas Getmanenko Oct 2010

Executive Compensation: The Law And Incentives, Stas Getmanenko

Stas Getmanenko

Excessive executive compensation frequently breeds resentment, undermines consumer faith in the financial system, and overly stigmatizes otherwise common business failures. Frequently, the opponents of lavish pay packages compare executive compensation to the compensation of rank-and-file workers. Such criticism reflects perfectly appropriate societal concerns over pay equity and distribution of wealth within a society. An entirely separate source of friction is the shareholders’ right to benefit from the corporation’s wealth. Shareholders’ dividend is directly reduced by the company’s expenses, one of which executive compensation. For most of today’s public companies the executive compensation expense is often negligible when ...


The Mortgage Market Crisis: A Game Theory Analysis, Raquel Mato Sep 2010

The Mortgage Market Crisis: A Game Theory Analysis, Raquel Mato

Raquel Mato

The mortgage market experienced a global bubble during the early 2000s. The bubble burst in 2006, creating a global financial crisis with widespread repercussions. In this paper, I will discuss how the mortgage market normally works and what changes occurred leading up to the 2000s that allowed for the rapid expansion of the mortgage market. I will talk about contributing factors such as: deregulation of the market, government encouragement of homeownership, the mortgage backed securities market, existing legislation, and a general lack of responsibility by all parties involved. I will use various aspects of game theory to explain how this ...


Is The Public Utility Holding Company Act A Model For Breaking Up The Banks That Are Too-Big-To-Fail?, Roberta S. Karmel Sep 2010

Is The Public Utility Holding Company Act A Model For Breaking Up The Banks That Are Too-Big-To-Fail?, Roberta S. Karmel

Roberta S. Karmel

ABSTRACT FOR “IS THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT A MODEL FOR BREAKING UP THE BANKS THAT ARE TO-BIG-TO-FAIL?”

BY ROBERTA S. KARMEL

During the financial crisis of 2007-08 and the debates on regulatory reform that followed, there was general agreement that the “too-big-to-fail” principle creates unacceptable moral hazard. Policy makers divided, however, on the solutions to this problem. Some argued that the banking behemoths in the United States should be broken up. Others argued that dismantling the big banks would be bad policy because these banks would not be able to compete with universal banks in the global capital ...


The Effect Of Religious Affiliation And Church Attendance On State Fiscal Progressivity, Erika Dayle Siu Sep 2010

The Effect Of Religious Affiliation And Church Attendance On State Fiscal Progressivity, Erika Dayle Siu

Erika Dayle Siu

This study finds that with minor exception, neither religious affiliation nor regular church attendance significantly affects state fiscal progressivity. Based on an examination of prevailing theological traditions within major religious groups, a viable hypothesis is that a state’s fiscal progressivity should correlate to its religious demographics to some extent, depending on the social justice beliefs of each religious group. If so, states with a greater percentage of Catholics and Jewish residents would have more fiscal progressivity; states with a greater percentage of Mainline Protestants and Historically Black Church members would also evidence fiscal progressivity but to a lesser extent ...


A Lay Word For A Legal Term: How The Popular Definition Of Charity Has Muddled The Perception Of The Charitable Deduction, Paul J. Valentine Sep 2010

A Lay Word For A Legal Term: How The Popular Definition Of Charity Has Muddled The Perception Of The Charitable Deduction, Paul J. Valentine

Paul J Valentine

In the United States there is a deeply held conviction “that taxpayers who donate to charity should generally not be subject to the same income tax liability as similarly situated taxpayers.” This innate sense about the Internal Revenue Code’s section 170, otherwise known as the charitable deduction, resonates with the Americans’ sense of fairness and creates strong barriers to curtailing its function. This same sense of fairness is tied to the perceived effects of the charitable deduction. Yet, how “charitable” is the charitable deduction and how charitable do we expect it to be? This paper argues that the discrepancy ...


Déjà Vu: From Comic Books To Video Games: Legislative Reliance On “Soft Science” To Protect Against Uncertain Societal Harm Linked To Violence V. The First Amendment, Terri R. Day, Ryan C.W. Hall M.D. Sep 2010

Déjà Vu: From Comic Books To Video Games: Legislative Reliance On “Soft Science” To Protect Against Uncertain Societal Harm Linked To Violence V. The First Amendment, Terri R. Day, Ryan C.W. Hall M.D.

Terri R. Day

This article discusses the weaknesses and limitations of social science evidence to prove that the virtual world of violent video games causes any real world harm. The Supreme Court, in its next term, will consider the constitutionality of California’s ban on the sale and rental of violent video games to minors. The controversy on violent video games is the latest legislative attempt to ban access and distribution of violent materials to children, reminiscent of the comic books debate over sixty years ago. This paper goes beyond a discussion of the First Amendment obstacles to violent video game restrictions. It ...


Retroactivity And The Estate Tax, John R. Cianfrone Sep 2010

Retroactivity And The Estate Tax, John R. Cianfrone

John R. Cianfrone

The estate tax was sunsetted in the Economic Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act (“EGTRRA”) of 2001. As a result, there is no estate tax in 2010. In 2011, the estate tax returns in full force to pre-2001 levels. The potential fiscal loss that would result from the lack of an estate tax in 2010 has led many to believe that Congress will apply some form of the estate tax to 2010 retroactively. This paper examines whether the retroactivity literature should be modified in the context of sunsetted legislation. Generally, retroactive tax legislation must pass two requirements: it must be rationally ...


Ending The Power To Say No: The Case For Extending Compulsory Licensing To Cover Digital Music Reproduction And Distribution Rights, Patrick A. Mckay Sep 2010

Ending The Power To Say No: The Case For Extending Compulsory Licensing To Cover Digital Music Reproduction And Distribution Rights, Patrick A. Mckay

Patrick A McKay

This paper argues that the recording industry has abused its power to deny uses of copyrighted music and has failed to satisfy the constitutional purpose of copyright of providing for the public benefit. As a result, this power should be removed and replaced with a compulsory license system similar to the Section 115 Reform Act of 2006 (SIRA), which would create a blanket collective license covering digital reproduction and distribution rights for musical works. Additionally, in order to remove the cloud of uncertainty which surrounds music used in user-generated videos, Congress should consider extending the compulsory license regime to cover ...


Engaging Law Students In Leadership, Faith Rivers James Sep 2010

Engaging Law Students In Leadership, Faith Rivers James

Faith R Rivers James

The new challenge of legal education is preparing civic-minded lawyers to assume leadership roles in their communities, law firms, the legal profession, and in the public square. Defined as the process of influencing and persuading others to achieve a common purpose, leadership describes the lawyers’ task with individual and organizational clients; considered as a characteristic of people in positions of power, lawyers often assume the mantle of leading organizations. Whether defined as process or position, lawyering involves leadership in the private sector or in the public realm. This article considers the progressive structure of a comprehensive law & leadership program, and ...


Rationing Justice?: The Effect Of Caseload Pressures On The U.S. Courts Of Appeals In Immigration Cases, Anna O. Law Aug 2010

Rationing Justice?: The Effect Of Caseload Pressures On The U.S. Courts Of Appeals In Immigration Cases, Anna O. Law

Anna O. Law

Beginning in late 2003, the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Second and Ninth Circuits experienced a deluge of immigration cases caused by changes in another part of the immigration bureaucracy. How did these two circuits, especially the Ninth circuit and its personnel, which handle more than 50% of all immigration appeals nationwide, respond to the "immigration surge" as it came to be called? Using interview data from 25% of the active judges on the court and some central staff, the article examines the series of internal experiments in case management that the Ninth Circuit was forced to undertake ...


Insulating Agencies: Avoiding Capture Through Institutional Design, Rachel E. Barkow Aug 2010

Insulating Agencies: Avoiding Capture Through Institutional Design, Rachel E. Barkow

Rachel E Barkow

So-called independent agencies are created for a reason, and often that reason is a concern with agency capture. Agency designers hope that a more insulated agency will better protect the general public interest against interest group pressure. But the conventional approach to independent agencies in administrative law largely ignores why agencies are insulated. Instead, discussions about independent agencies in administrative law have focused on three features that have defined independent agencies: whether their heads are removable at will or for cause by the President, whether they must submit regulations to the President’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs for ...


Lessons In Price Stability From The U.S. Real Estate Market Collapse, Andrea J. Boyack Aug 2010

Lessons In Price Stability From The U.S. Real Estate Market Collapse, Andrea J. Boyack

Andrea J Boyack

The U.S. residential housing market collapse illustrates the consequences of ignoring risk while funding mortgage borrowing. Collateral over-valuation was a foundational piece of the crisis. Over the past few decades, secondary markets, securitization, policy and psychology increased the flow of funds into real estate. At the same time, financial market segmentation divorced risk from reward. Increased mortgage capital availability, unmitigated by proper risk allocation, led to real estate price inflation. Social trends and government policies exacerbated both the mortgage capital over-supply and the risk-valuation disconnect.

The Dodd-Frank Act inadequately addresses the underlying asset valuation problem. Federal regulation may support ...


Stopping A Vicious Cycle: The Problems With Credit Checks In Employment And Strategies To Limit Their Use, Sharon Goott Nissim Aug 2010

Stopping A Vicious Cycle: The Problems With Credit Checks In Employment And Strategies To Limit Their Use, Sharon Goott Nissim

Sharon Goott Nissim

This paper explores a new and increasingly common phenomenon: the use of credit checks by employers to evaluate potential and current employees. This practice has profound implications in this current weak economy, as those who most need jobs often are the ones turned away due to bad credit. The use of credit checks also has a disproportionate effect on racial minorities as statistically they tend to have worse credit than non-minorities. Employers often assert that credit checks are necessary, despite the lack of hard data proving a link between poor credit and poor job performance.

This paper examines two ways ...


Anti-Cyber Bullying Statutes: Threat To Student Free Speech, John O. Hayward Aug 2010

Anti-Cyber Bullying Statutes: Threat To Student Free Speech, John O. Hayward

John O. Hayward

In October 2006, thirteen-year-old Megan Meier committed suicide because of postings on MySpace, an Internet social networking site. As a result, twenty-one states have passed statutes prohibiting cyber bullying, i.e., bullying by electronic means. Many of these laws threaten student free speech. This article examines cyber bullying, the laws it has spawned, how they chill student speech, their constitutionality, and proposes a Model Anti-Cyber Bullying Law.


Relational Integrity Regulation: Nudging Consumers Toward Products Bearing Valid Environmental Marketing Claims, Jeffrey J. Minneti Aug 2010

Relational Integrity Regulation: Nudging Consumers Toward Products Bearing Valid Environmental Marketing Claims, Jeffrey J. Minneti

Jeffrey J Minneti

Over the last two decades scholars have addressed attributes of effective environmental regulation and advocated a wide spectrum of regulatory approaches, from the traditional command-and-control model to a libertarian-paternalism approach. Some writers have used those approaches to advocate for modifications to the Green Guides. This article joins that conversation and accomplishes two goals. First, it harmonizes environmental regulation scholarship, resulting in the creation of a new form of regulation that it terms “Relational Integrity” regulation. Second, in light of the Relational Integrity approach to regulation, the article examines public and private environmental claim regulatory schemes and suggests how those schemes ...


Classifying Admissions And Prior Statements: Alternatives To Rule 801(D)’S Confusing And Misguided Use Of The Term “Not Hearsay”, Sam Stonefield Aug 2010

Classifying Admissions And Prior Statements: Alternatives To Rule 801(D)’S Confusing And Misguided Use Of The Term “Not Hearsay”, Sam Stonefield

Sam Stonefield

This article examines the treatment of admissions and prior statements in hearsay law generally and in Rule 801(d) of the Federal Rules of Evidence in particular. Nearly everyone agrees that Rule 801(d)’s classification of such statements as “not hearsay” is “awkward” and “wrong” (even “Orwellian”) and violates the norms of clarity and consistency expected of good drafting and the standards of the Guidelines for Drafting and Editing the Federal Rules. Yet the rule was drafted by a distinguished Advisory Committee, enacted by Congress, adopted by 34 states and has survived for over 35 years. How did this ...


Good Deficits: Protecting The Public Interest From Deficit Hysteria, Neil H. Buchanan Aug 2010

Good Deficits: Protecting The Public Interest From Deficit Hysteria, Neil H. Buchanan

Neil H. Buchanan

President Obama has come under increasingly fierce criticism for the size of the federal budget deficit, as both Democratic and Republican politicians loudly proclaim that federal spending should be cut. This article explains why such anti-deficit fervor is misguided and simplistic, and why, perhaps counter-intuitively, cutting government spending can hurt the country, rather than help it, in both the short run and the long run.

In the short run, cutting deficit spending can be disastrous to the economy, especially if the economy is already in decline. In addition, because the federal budget fails to separate spending that provides long-term benefits ...


Bargaining With Double Jeopardy, Saul Levmore, Ariel Porat Aug 2010

Bargaining With Double Jeopardy, Saul Levmore, Ariel Porat

Saul Levmore

Virtually every legal system specifies a variety of burdens of proof for different kinds of claims, and then secures each specification with another, nominally unrelated rule pertaining to relitigation. In criminal law, where a prosecutor might be required to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, the prosecutor is prevented from repeatedly drawing from the urn, as it were, by the familiar and nearly universal rule of double jeopardy. Nevertheless, this Article suggests that if law were to weaken the protection, or more likely to permit the defendant to waive the double jeopardy protection, both private and social benefits might follow ...


“Classifying Admissions And Prior Statements: Alternatives To Rule 801(D)’S Confusing And Misguided “Not Hearsay” Terminology.”, Sam Stonefield Aug 2010

“Classifying Admissions And Prior Statements: Alternatives To Rule 801(D)’S Confusing And Misguided “Not Hearsay” Terminology.”, Sam Stonefield

Sam Stonefield

Abstract: Classifying Admissions and Prior Statements: Alternatives to Rule 801(d)’s Confusing and Misguided Use of The Term “Not Hearsay”

This article examines the treatment of admissions and prior statements in hearsay law generally and in Rule 801(d) of the Federal Rules of Evidence in particular. Nearly everyone agrees that Rule 801(d)’s classification of such statements as “not hearsay” is “awkward” and “wrong” (even “Orwellian”) and violates the norms of clarity and consistency expected of good drafting and the standards of the Guidelines for Drafting and Editing the Federal Rules. Yet the rule was drafted by ...


How Powerful Is The Ioc? – Let’S Talk About The Environment, Marc A. R. Zemel Aug 2010

How Powerful Is The Ioc? – Let’S Talk About The Environment, Marc A. R. Zemel

Marc A. R. Zemel

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is in a unique position as the supreme administrator of an immensely popular international mega-event and a self-proclaimed champion of environmental issues and sustainable development. Every two years, cities from all over the world spend millions of dollars for the mere privilege of competing to host the Olympic Games, and those cities must play by the IOC’s rules. In addition, Article 2 of the Olympic Charter, the constitution-like instrument governing the IOC and the Olympic Movement, requires the IOC to ensure that the Olympics are held to promote sustainable development and show concern for ...


Rescuing The Strong Precautionary Principle From Its Critics, Noah Sachs Aug 2010

Rescuing The Strong Precautionary Principle From Its Critics, Noah Sachs

Noah Sachs

The Strong Precautionary Principle, a theory of risk regulation that shifts the burden of proof on safety, provides a valuable framework for preventing harm to human health and the environment. Yet Cass Sunstein and other scholars have consistently attacked it as paralyzing, inflexible, and extreme.

This Article undertakes a reassessment of the Strong Precautionary Principle, providing a counterweight to the mountain of critical scholarship. The Principle sends a clear message that firms must research the health and environmental risks of their products, before harm occurs. It does not call for the elimination of all risk, but through burden shifting, the ...