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2010

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Environmental Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Clean Water Act’S Final Frontier: Taking On Nonpoint Source Pollution Using Mandatory Tmdl Rules, Jason M. Stoffel Dec 2010

The Clean Water Act’S Final Frontier: Taking On Nonpoint Source Pollution Using Mandatory Tmdl Rules, Jason M. Stoffel

Jason M Stoffel

While the Clean Water Act, as it is currently structured, has few provisions that directly regulate nonpoint source pollution, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, in the case Friends of Pinto Creek v. United States EPA, 504 F.3d 1007 (9th Cir. 2007), has recognized the Total Maximum Daily Load ("TMDL") program as a tool that can be used by the EPA to indirectly compel states to regulate nonpoint source pollution in the nation’s impaired waters. In the context of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling, in 2010, the EPA made national headlines by pushing states to regulate nonpoint source ...


China’S Gigantic Appetite For Natural Resources Spurs Multilateral Concerns, Yuliya Kostelova Nov 2010

China’S Gigantic Appetite For Natural Resources Spurs Multilateral Concerns, Yuliya Kostelova

Yuliya Kostelova

China is the second largest economy in the world today. Its economic growth is unbridled and expansion is rampant. A rapidly growing communistic state with an attempt for capitalistic market is alarming in the international economic community. China’s insatiable oil appetite creates various concerns among major sovereign partners. Notwithstanding, China is fully committed to its economic development in the future regardless of widely expressed multilateral concerns.


Banking On Allowances: The Epa’S Mixed Record In Managing Emissions-Market Transitions, Nathan D. Richardson, Arthur G. Fraas Oct 2010

Banking On Allowances: The Epa’S Mixed Record In Managing Emissions-Market Transitions, Nathan D. Richardson, Arthur G. Fraas

Nathan D Richardson

The history of emissions-trading markets in the United States is marked by change. Since cap-and-trade programs were first implemented on a large scale after the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has repeatedly revised and replaced emissionstrading markets for nitrous oxides and sulfur dioxide. In each transition, the agency has had to decide what to do with emissions allowances banked in the earlier program. These banked allowances represent early reductions in emissions, with corresponding environmental benefits, but also the expectation on the part of regulated entities that they will continue to hold ...