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Justice O'Connor And The "Right To Die": Constitutional Promises Unfulfilled, Michael P. Allen Feb 2006

Justice O'Connor And The "Right To Die": Constitutional Promises Unfulfilled, Michael P. Allen

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


What's Right And Wrong With “No Endorsement”, Thomas C. Berg Jan 2006

What's Right And Wrong With “No Endorsement”, Thomas C. Berg

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Contrary to Professor Wexler, I argue that unless the endorsement test is properly understood and limited, it has the critical flaw of putting the Establishment Clause at war with the other religion guarantee of the First Amendment, the Free Exercise Clause. If the Establishment Clause forbade government endorsement of religion in all contexts, it would undermine the government’s ability to give special accommodation to religious practice and thus would severely impair free exercise values. “No endorsement of religion” thus must function, not as the general requirement of the Establishment Clause, but only as a rule for the particular class ...


The Endorsement Court, Jay D. Wexler Jan 2006

The Endorsement Court, Jay D. Wexler

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

The Rehnquist Court was the first to apply the so-called “endorsement test” to evaluate the constitutionality of government-sponsored religious symbols and displays. The test asks whether a “reasonable observer” would feel that the government has sent “a message to non-adherents that they are outsiders, not full members of the political community, and an accompanying message to adherents that they are insiders, favored members of the political community.” Although the Supreme Court itself has applied the endorsement test in only a handful of cases, the test has played an extremely important role in how courts throughout the country have evaluated government ...


In Praise Of Contextuality - Justice O'Connor And The Establishment Clause, Marie Failinger Jan 2006

In Praise Of Contextuality - Justice O'Connor And The Establishment Clause, Marie Failinger

Faculty Scholarship

Among Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s lasting contributions to Supreme Court Jurisprudence has been her attempt to contextualize Religion Clause jurisprudence, to move the Court in the direction of considering the circumstances surrounding government in assessing its constitutionality. Typical of this contributor has been her two decades of work in Establishment Clause law, in particular, ended by Lynch v. Donnelly, in which she introduced the “non-endorsement” test and one of the Ten Commandment cases, McCreary County, Kentucky v. American Civil Liberties Union, in which it was most recently employed. The non-endorsement test has served as one of the two ...


Constitutional Jurisprudence Of Sandra Day O'Connor: A Refusal To "Foreclose The Unanticipated", Wilson R. Huhn Jan 2006

Constitutional Jurisprudence Of Sandra Day O'Connor: A Refusal To "Foreclose The Unanticipated", Wilson R. Huhn

Akron Law Publications

Earlier this year, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor retired from the Supreme Court of the United States after 25 years of service. It would be difficult to overstate the impact that Justice O’Connor has had on the interpretation of the Constitution during her tenure on the Court. Her importance to the development of American constitutional law stems from her central position on the Supreme Court. Professor Erwin Chemerinsky has described her role in these terms:

O’Connor is in control. In virtually every area of constitutional law, her key fifth vote determines what will be the majority’s position ...


Constitutional Jurisprudence Of Sandra Day O'Connor: A Refusal To "Foreclose The Unanticipated", Wilson R. Huhn Dec 2005

Constitutional Jurisprudence Of Sandra Day O'Connor: A Refusal To "Foreclose The Unanticipated", Wilson R. Huhn

Wilson R. Huhn

Earlier this year, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor retired from the Supreme Court of the United States after 25 years of service. It would be difficult to overstate the impact that Justice O’Connor has had on the interpretation of the Constitution during her tenure on the Court. Her importance to the development of American constitutional law stems from her central position on the Supreme Court. Professor Erwin Chemerinsky has described her role in these terms:

O’Connor is in control. In virtually every area of constitutional law, her key fifth vote determines what will be the majority’s position ...