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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2006

Employment Discrimination

Civil Rights and Discrimination

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

Intersectionality And Identity: Revisiting A Wrinkle In Title Vii, Bradley Areheart Nov 2006

Intersectionality And Identity: Revisiting A Wrinkle In Title Vii, Bradley Areheart

Bradley A. Areheart

This article revisits intersectionality, a way of postulating legal identity. Simply put, intersectionality acknowledges that one person’s identity can never be reduced to solely one characteristic, such as religion or sex. Rather, each person’s identity is constructed of the various intersections of ways one might describe oneself.

In the legal context, intersectionality has typically arisen in cases of employment discrimination, where those who theoretically could file a claim under more than protected category are forced to choose only one for their claim—for example, parsing one’s identity as either race or sex, even though a statute like ...


The "American Rule" That Swallows The Exception, Joseph E. Slater Sep 2006

The "American Rule" That Swallows The Exception, Joseph E. Slater

ExpressO

The “American” rule of employment at-will cripples the effectiveness of the two most important exceptions to that doctrine, the National Labor Relations Act and Title VII. Scholars often cite at-will as an area in which exceptions swallow the rule but ignore the opposite effect the rule has in undermining rights widely viewed as fundamental. This article goes beyond the standard critiques of the NLRA and Title VII and uses two other areas of law to make this case. The impact of at-will on private sector labor rights under the NLRA is shown by comparing public sector employment. Public sector labor ...


The Small Firm Exemption And The Single Employer Doctrine In Employment Discrimination Law, Richard R. Carlson May 2006

The Small Firm Exemption And The Single Employer Doctrine In Employment Discrimination Law, Richard R. Carlson

ExpressO

The small firm exemption is a provision of Title VII and the other major federal employment discrimination laws that exempts very small firms from coverage as “employers.” Under the Title VII version of the exemption, for example, an employer is exempt as long as it employs no more than fourteen employees. However, a small firm might be affiliated or integrated with other firms, which collectively employ more than the number of employees required for coverage. The single employer doctrine is a rule for treating separately organized firms as if they were one employer, for purposes of meeting the statutory threshold ...


The Ineffectiveness Of Capped Damages In Cases Of Employment Discrimination: Solutions Toward Deterrence, Vanessa M. Ruggles Apr 2006

The Ineffectiveness Of Capped Damages In Cases Of Employment Discrimination: Solutions Toward Deterrence, Vanessa M. Ruggles

ExpressO

Although the Civil Rights Act of 1991 helped victims of employment discrimination in a variety of ways, including the authorization of jury trials and the accompanying possibility of compensatory and punitive damages, the caps Congress placed on damages do not serve the purpose of deterrence. Because the caps are based on the number of employees a defendant employer has, the goal of protecting small businesses from exorbitant damages is accomplished. However, because the top category of the caps is “500 or more” employees, giant corporations escape meaningful awards. This article identifies the problem citing specific examples, and proposes several solutions ...


Disability And Employment Discrimination At The Rehnquist Court, Anita Silvers, Michael E. Waterstone, Michael Ashley Stein Apr 2006

Disability And Employment Discrimination At The Rehnquist Court, Anita Silvers, Michael E. Waterstone, Michael Ashley Stein

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Disability, Disparate Impact, And Class Actions, Michael Ashley Stein, Michael E. Waterstone Jan 2006

Disability, Disparate Impact, And Class Actions, Michael Ashley Stein, Michael E. Waterstone

Faculty Publications

Following Title VII's enactment, group-based employment discrimination actions flourished due to disparate impact theory and the class action device. Courts recognized that subordination that defined a group's social identity was also sufficient legally to bind members together, even when relief had to be issued individually. Woven through these cases was a notion of panethnicity that united inherently unrelated groups into a common identity, for example, Asian Americans. Stringent judicial interpretation subsequently eroded both legal frameworks and it has become increasingly difficult to assert collective employment actions, even against discriminatory practices affecting an entire group. This deconstruction has immensely ...