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2006

Discrimination

Hospitality Administration and Management

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Retaliation: The Fastest-Growing Discrimination Claim, David Sherwyn, Zev Eigen, Gregg Gilman Nov 2006

Retaliation: The Fastest-Growing Discrimination Claim, David Sherwyn, Zev Eigen, Gregg Gilman

Articles and Chapters

Many employers were shocked and alarmed when the U.S. Supreme Court in June 2006 unanimously established a relatively broad standard regarding employees’ complaints of retaliation by employers when employees have made discrimination complaints. An examination of case law as well as comments made by those attending the 2006 Labor and Employment Law Roundtable at the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration allow us to conclude that although employees who make complaints need to be treated carefully, employers need not panic. Instead, they must thoroughly document any personnel actions and base them on actual performance, making sure that any termination ...


You (Don’T) Look Marvelous: Considerations For Employers Regulating Employee Appearance, G. Roger King, Jeffrey D. Winchester, David Sherwyn Nov 2006

You (Don’T) Look Marvelous: Considerations For Employers Regulating Employee Appearance, G. Roger King, Jeffrey D. Winchester, David Sherwyn

Articles and Chapters

Under federal law, employers are generally allowed to set policies regulating employees’ appearance, provided that those policies do not impinge on groups specifically protected under federal statute. State and local laws, however, may preclude employers from implementing such dress and appearance policies. Employers whose workers are unionized must consider the provisions of the bargaining agreement. One trend in connection with regulations relating to employees’ appearance and dress is that creative lawyers have stretched the law to cover certain workers.