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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Gina, What Could You Do For Me One Day?: The Potential Of The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act To Protect The American Public, Lauren J. Sismondo Jan 2006

Gina, What Could You Do For Me One Day?: The Potential Of The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act To Protect The American Public, Lauren J. Sismondo

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


The Military's Ban On Consensual Sodomy In A Post-Lawrence World, Jeremy J. Gray Jan 2006

The Military's Ban On Consensual Sodomy In A Post-Lawrence World, Jeremy J. Gray

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


A Tale Of Two Bloggers: Free Speech And Privacy In The Blogosphere, Daniel J. Solove Jan 2006

A Tale Of Two Bloggers: Free Speech And Privacy In The Blogosphere, Daniel J. Solove

Washington University Law Review

It is true that existing law lacks nimble ways to resolve disputes about speech and privacy on the Internet. Lawsuits are costly to litigate, and being sued can saddle a blogger with massive expenses. Bloggers often don’t have deep pockets, and therefore it might be difficult for plaintiffs to find lawyers willing to take their cases. Lawsuits can take years to resolve. People seeking to protect their privacy must risk further publicity in bringing suit. These are certainly serious problems, but the solution shouldn’t be to insulate bloggers from the law. The solution is to create a system ...


The Story Of Me: The Underprotection Of Autobiographical Speech, Sonja R. West Jan 2006

The Story Of Me: The Underprotection Of Autobiographical Speech, Sonja R. West

Washington University Law Review

This Article begins the debate over the constitutional underprotection of autobiographical speech. While receiving significant historical, scientific, religious, and philosophical respect for centuries, the time-honored practice of talking about yourself has been ignored by legal scholars. A consequence of this oversight is that current free speech principles protect the autobiographies of the powerful but leave the stories of “ordinary” people vulnerable to challenge. Shifting attitudes about privacy combined with advanced technologies, meanwhile, have led to more people than ever before having both the desire and the means to tell their stories to a widespread audience. This Article argues that truthful ...