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2006

Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Legal assistance to the poor

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Looking For Justice On A Two-Way Street, Nancy L. Cook Jan 2006

Looking For Justice On A Two-Way Street, Nancy L. Cook

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

The unstated truth about lawyer-community “collaborations” is that lawyers, by and large, do not intend to bridge the gap between the powerful (themselves included) and poor communities by giving up their apparent privileges and taking advantage of what communities would have to offer if they did. Access is therefore generally presumed to go in one direction. Lawyers seek to give client populations access to the halls of political and economic power, but they do not think in terms of providing judges and the economically privileged access to financially under-supported communities. In these pages, I look at the contemporary notions of ...


Structural Racism, Structural Pollution And The Need For A New Paradigm, Luke W. Cole, Caroline Farrell Jan 2006

Structural Racism, Structural Pollution And The Need For A New Paradigm, Luke W. Cole, Caroline Farrell

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Any serious attempt to address the issues of poverty, wealth and the working poor would do well to learn from the Environmental Justice movement, a broad-based national social movement that has emerged from the ground up over the past twenty years. The movement operates at the intersection of race, poverty and the environment, and offers hope in an otherwise bleak landscape of environmental and social justice advocacy. The movement offers a new paradigm for community leadership and control. This Essay explores the need for that new paradigm, using one community’s struggle against toxic intrusion to illustrate the failure of ...


Post-Welfare Lawyering: Clinical Legal Education And A New Poverty Law Agenda, Juliet M. Brodie Jan 2006

Post-Welfare Lawyering: Clinical Legal Education And A New Poverty Law Agenda, Juliet M. Brodie

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Ours is the “post-welfare” era, and it is ripe with opportunities for poverty lawyers to shape a new poverty law agenda. This era is characterized by the millions of former welfare recipients who entered the wage-labor force, and by a new public dialogue about post-welfare poverty. Journalists, social scientists, and policymakers have been watching these “welfare leavers,” assessing their labor market participation, their “success,” and their economic well-being. Together, these observers and actors have created a new academic, political, and cultural terrain on which American poverty is debated and constructed—one where “the working poor” has replaced “the welfare recipient ...