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Full-Text Articles in Law

Democracy, Race, And Multiculturalism In The Twenty-First Century: Will The Voting Rights Act Ever Be Obsolete?, Sheryll D. Cashin Jan 2006

Democracy, Race, And Multiculturalism In The Twenty-First Century: Will The Voting Rights Act Ever Be Obsolete?, Sheryll D. Cashin

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

In this Essay I reflect on the impact of the Voting Rights Act (“the Act”) and what growing racial diversity portends for American democracy in the twenty-first century. The enduring quandary of the Act, in my view, is that it attempts to ensure meaningful political participation for the traditionally disenfranchised while operating against a backdrop of still-divisive race relations. The historic cleavage between blacks and whites in the South remains a centuries-old conundrum, familiar to any student of American politics. Such racial divides are less pronounced nationally. But it remains the case that race and political affiliation are substantially correlated ...


Race, Homeownership And Wealth, Thomas M. Shapiro Jan 2006

Race, Homeownership And Wealth, Thomas M. Shapiro

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Closing the racial wealth gap must be at the forefront of the civil rights agenda in the twenty-first century. This Essay examines homeownership as a main policy strategy to move toward this goal. The Essay opens by restating the crucial importance of closing the racial wealth gap, and offers an early assessment of this agenda. Next, the Essay argues that homeownership is an appropriate strategy to attack the racial wealth gap. Finally, the Essay examines the various promises and many potential pitfalls and challenges facing minority homeownership.


Structural Racism, Structural Pollution And The Need For A New Paradigm, Luke W. Cole, Caroline Farrell Jan 2006

Structural Racism, Structural Pollution And The Need For A New Paradigm, Luke W. Cole, Caroline Farrell

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Any serious attempt to address the issues of poverty, wealth and the working poor would do well to learn from the Environmental Justice movement, a broad-based national social movement that has emerged from the ground up over the past twenty years. The movement operates at the intersection of race, poverty and the environment, and offers hope in an otherwise bleak landscape of environmental and social justice advocacy. The movement offers a new paradigm for community leadership and control. This Essay explores the need for that new paradigm, using one community’s struggle against toxic intrusion to illustrate the failure of ...