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Full-Text Articles in Law

Poverty, Justice, And Community Lawyering: Interdisciplinary And Clinical Perspectives, Karen Tokarz Jan 2006

Poverty, Justice, And Community Lawyering: Interdisciplinary And Clinical Perspectives, Karen Tokarz

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This introduction recognizes the efforts toward social justice through interdisciplinary clinical teaching and practice. The goals of this project are three-fold: to raise awareness about interdisciplinary clinical teaching and practice, to inspire thoughtful discussion and debate, and to develop scholarship, guidelines, and course materials.

Throughout the project, there has been a focus on questions raised in both academia and practice: What are the goals, the rewards, and the challenges of interdisciplinary teaching and practice? How does one go about designing and developing an interdisciplinary clinic or course? What are the ethical issues that arise in interdisciplinary education and practice, and ...


Toward A New Understanding Of American Poverty, Mark R. Rank Jan 2006

Toward A New Understanding Of American Poverty, Mark R. Rank

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay argues that one of the fundamental reasons the United States currently has the highest poverty rates in the industrialized world is that we have consistently misunderstood the nature and causes of American poverty. Old strategies of addressing poverty have rested upon imagining a world that reflects a preferred set of myths, agendas, and policies; a new approach to poverty reduction must put in place a set of policies that reflects the realities of the world. These policies should be grounded in a new understanding of the nature and meaning of American poverty. This Essay provides the rudimentary details ...


Looking For Justice On A Two-Way Street, Nancy L. Cook Jan 2006

Looking For Justice On A Two-Way Street, Nancy L. Cook

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

The unstated truth about lawyer-community “collaborations” is that lawyers, by and large, do not intend to bridge the gap between the powerful (themselves included) and poor communities by giving up their apparent privileges and taking advantage of what communities would have to offer if they did. Access is therefore generally presumed to go in one direction. Lawyers seek to give client populations access to the halls of political and economic power, but they do not think in terms of providing judges and the economically privileged access to financially under-supported communities. In these pages, I look at the contemporary notions of ...


Living On A Poverty Income: The Role Of Non-Governmental Agencies In The Scramble For Resources, Ronald Angel, Laura Lein Jan 2006

Living On A Poverty Income: The Role Of Non-Governmental Agencies In The Scramble For Resources, Ronald Angel, Laura Lein

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Our objective is to illustrate the precariousness of the formal social service safety net for low-income families and to argue that social inequality in urban America is exacerbated by the inequitable distribution of more formal sources of support. Ultimately, we examine whether the current system of service delivery for poor families is adequate, and what toll these fragmented and discontinuous services take on a family’s ability to thrive.


Revolutionary Lawyering: Addressing The Root Causes Of Poverty And Wealth, William P. Quigley Jan 2006

Revolutionary Lawyering: Addressing The Root Causes Of Poverty And Wealth, William P. Quigley

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

It is true that lawyers are rarely revolutionaries. In fact, the idea may seem like an oxymoron (like corporate ethics), but some people are, and others can be, revolutionary lawyers. Our profession is, at the core of its practice, the primary profession world-wide that protects and defends the machines, computers, profit motives and property rights so rightly condemned by Dr. King. We use our training, wealth, and position in society to facilitate commerce without conscience, to accumulate wealth without responsibility, and to serve the needs of corporations over and above the rights and needs of people. Yet still, some lawyers ...


Race, Homeownership And Wealth, Thomas M. Shapiro Jan 2006

Race, Homeownership And Wealth, Thomas M. Shapiro

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Closing the racial wealth gap must be at the forefront of the civil rights agenda in the twenty-first century. This Essay examines homeownership as a main policy strategy to move toward this goal. The Essay opens by restating the crucial importance of closing the racial wealth gap, and offers an early assessment of this agenda. Next, the Essay argues that homeownership is an appropriate strategy to attack the racial wealth gap. Finally, the Essay examines the various promises and many potential pitfalls and challenges facing minority homeownership.


Structural Racism, Structural Pollution And The Need For A New Paradigm, Luke W. Cole, Caroline Farrell Jan 2006

Structural Racism, Structural Pollution And The Need For A New Paradigm, Luke W. Cole, Caroline Farrell

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Any serious attempt to address the issues of poverty, wealth and the working poor would do well to learn from the Environmental Justice movement, a broad-based national social movement that has emerged from the ground up over the past twenty years. The movement operates at the intersection of race, poverty and the environment, and offers hope in an otherwise bleak landscape of environmental and social justice advocacy. The movement offers a new paradigm for community leadership and control. This Essay explores the need for that new paradigm, using one community’s struggle against toxic intrusion to illustrate the failure of ...


Post-Welfare Lawyering: Clinical Legal Education And A New Poverty Law Agenda, Juliet M. Brodie Jan 2006

Post-Welfare Lawyering: Clinical Legal Education And A New Poverty Law Agenda, Juliet M. Brodie

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Ours is the “post-welfare” era, and it is ripe with opportunities for poverty lawyers to shape a new poverty law agenda. This era is characterized by the millions of former welfare recipients who entered the wage-labor force, and by a new public dialogue about post-welfare poverty. Journalists, social scientists, and policymakers have been watching these “welfare leavers,” assessing their labor market participation, their “success,” and their economic well-being. Together, these observers and actors have created a new academic, political, and cultural terrain on which American poverty is debated and constructed—one where “the working poor” has replaced “the welfare recipient ...