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Full-Text Articles in Law

Do International Criminal Tribunals Deter Or Exacerbate Humanitarian Atrocities?, Julian Ku, Jide Nzelibe Jan 2006

Do International Criminal Tribunals Deter Or Exacerbate Humanitarian Atrocities?, Julian Ku, Jide Nzelibe

Washington University Law Review

Contemporary justifications for international criminal tribunals (ICTs), especially the permanent International Criminal Court, often stress the role of such tribunals in deterring future humanitarian atrocities. But hardly any academic commentary has attempted to explore in depth this deterrence rationale. This Article utilizes economic models of deterrence to analyze whether a potential perpetrator of humanitarian atrocities would likely be deterred by the risk of future prosecution by an ICT. According to the economic theory of deterrence, two factors—certainty and severity of punishment—are central to the reduction of crime after taking into account a particular individual's preference for risk ...


Fired Up! In The Blogosphere: Internet Communications Regulation Under Federal Campaign Finance Law, Benjamin Norris Jan 2006

Fired Up! In The Blogosphere: Internet Communications Regulation Under Federal Campaign Finance Law, Benjamin Norris

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Wiley Rutledge, Executive Detention, And Judicial Conscience At War, Craig Green Jan 2006

Wiley Rutledge, Executive Detention, And Judicial Conscience At War, Craig Green

Washington University Law Review

John Ferren’s Salt of the Earth, Conscience of the Court is the first full biography of Rutledge, and the book not only lifts Rutledge from obscurity’s shadow; it also dispels any “limbo” surrounding the Court he served. Part I of this Article offers a brief biographical sketch showing that Rutledge deserves that much. His pre-judicial life as dean, legal reformer, and advocate of progressive politics provides context for his work on the bench. Also, Rutledge’s tale illuminates broader issues, including FDR’s transformative judicial appointments, early twentieth-century legal education, and the New Deal’s influence on both ...


The Ideological Component Of Judging In The Taxation Context, Nancy Staudt, Lee Epstein, Peter J, Wiedenbeck Jan 2006

The Ideological Component Of Judging In The Taxation Context, Nancy Staudt, Lee Epstein, Peter J, Wiedenbeck

Washington University Law Review

Despite the vast number of systematic empirical studies of judicial behavior, we know surprisingly little about how and why judges reach decisions in the business and finance context. This void is due, in part, to scholars’ abiding focus on controversies involving civil rights and liberties; indeed, based on the extant literature, it would be easy to conclude that judges, particularly U.S. Supreme Court Justices, spend their days interpreting civil rights–type legislation to the exclusion of all other types of laws. Yet this conclusion is wide of the mark—even a simple count of the Supreme Court’s plenary ...


De-Rigging Elections: Direct Democracy And The Future Of Redistricting Reform, Michael S. Kang Jan 2006

De-Rigging Elections: Direct Democracy And The Future Of Redistricting Reform, Michael S. Kang

Washington University Law Review

I propose direct democracy as the best solution, a distinctly political solution, to the problems of contemporary gerrymandering. By requiring direct democratic approval by the general electorate for passage of any statewide redistricting plan, direct democracy invites the public into civic engagement about the fundamental issues of democratic governance that a democracy ought to embrace. In Part II, I briefly describe redistricting reform efforts to transfer greater responsibility for redistricting to apolitical institutions, namely courts and independent commissions. In Part III, I argue that these efforts to insulate redistricting from politics are badly misguided. I contend that redistricting, as a ...