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2006

State and Local Government Law

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 68

Full-Text Articles in Law

Party On: The Right To Voluntary Blanket Primaries, Margaret P. Aisenbrey Dec 2006

Party On: The Right To Voluntary Blanket Primaries, Margaret P. Aisenbrey

Michigan Law Review

Political parties have unique associational rights. In party primaries, party members associate to further their common political beliefs, and more importantly, to nominate candidates. These candidate are the "standard bearer[s]" for the political party-the people who "best represent[ ] the party's ideologies and preferences." The primary represents a "crucial juncture at which the appeal to common principles may be translated into concerted action, and hence to political power in the community." Because the primary is such a critical moment for the political party, the party's asso-ciational rights are most important at this time.


Issue 1: Annual Survey 2006 Table Of Contents Nov 2006

Issue 1: Annual Survey 2006 Table Of Contents

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Accrual Of Causes Of Action In Virginia, James W. Ellerman Nov 2006

Accrual Of Causes Of Action In Virginia, James W. Ellerman

University of Richmond Law Review

This article will examine major issues in Virginia law affecting the accrual of causes of action, specifically in the contexts of contract, tort, and property. In addition to surveying the basic accrual requirements for each area of law, this article will look more deeply into several specific issues that guide an accrual analysis particularly the distinction between causes and rights of action, as well as the continuous treatment, discovery, and economic loss rules.


Constitutional Crisis In The Commonwealth: Resolving The Conflict Between Governors And Attorneys General, Michael Signer Nov 2006

Constitutional Crisis In The Commonwealth: Resolving The Conflict Between Governors And Attorneys General, Michael Signer

University of Richmond Law Review

In this article, I argue the solution to agency conflict and the broader problem of establishing the proper scope of executive authority lies in establishing that Virginia has a "statutory" rather than a "common-law" model of the Attorney General's powers, and that the Office of the Attorney General is therefore circumscribed by statute. Contrary to popular understanding, I will argue that Wilder v. Attorney General of Virginia effectively establishes Virginia as a statutory state and resolves the conflict in favor of the Governor. Because the Supreme Court of Virginia is unlikely to act more strongly in favor of the ...


Bargain Basement Annexation: How Municipalities Subvert The Intent Of North Carolina Annexation Laws, Elizabeth R. Connolly Oct 2006

Bargain Basement Annexation: How Municipalities Subvert The Intent Of North Carolina Annexation Laws, Elizabeth R. Connolly

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


Protecting Abused, Neglected, And Abandoned Children: A Proposal For Provisional Out-Of-State Kinship Placements Pursuant To The Interstate Compact On The Placement Of Children, John C. Lore Iii Oct 2006

Protecting Abused, Neglected, And Abandoned Children: A Proposal For Provisional Out-Of-State Kinship Placements Pursuant To The Interstate Compact On The Placement Of Children, John C. Lore Iii

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children deals with the interstate placement of abused, neglected and abandoned children. This article addresses the critical need for reform of the Interstate Compact and attempts to tackle its most serious flaw-the lack of a provisional placement for children awaiting approval of out-of-state kinship placements. The recently enacted Safe and Timely Interstate Placement of Foster Children Act of 2006 (the "Act") is seriously flawed to the detriment of one of our country's most vulnerable groups and the very population it is designed to protect-children who have been abused, neglected and abandoned. This ...


A Tale Of Conflicting Sovereignties: The Case Against Tribal Sovereign Immunity And Federal Preemption Doctrines Preventing States' Enforcement Of Campaign Contribution Regulations On Indian Tribes, Paul Porter Oct 2006

A Tale Of Conflicting Sovereignties: The Case Against Tribal Sovereign Immunity And Federal Preemption Doctrines Preventing States' Enforcement Of Campaign Contribution Regulations On Indian Tribes, Paul Porter

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Note will discuss whether Indian tribes can assert tribal sovereign immunity to avoid compliance with state campaign finance regulation and whether such regulations should be preempted by federal law. Tribal sovereign immunity is not an enshrined constitutional imperative; it exists only under federal common law and can be limited by the courts from blocking state suits to enforce campaign finance regulations against tribes. This Note will also argue that state campaign finance regulations should not be preempted by federal law because states have a compelling interest in protecting their political processes from corruption that outweighs tribal interests in flouting ...


Administrative Agencies: A Comparison Of New Hampshire And Federal Agencies’ History, Structure And Rulemaking Requirements, Scott F. Johnson Sep 2006

Administrative Agencies: A Comparison Of New Hampshire And Federal Agencies’ History, Structure And Rulemaking Requirements, Scott F. Johnson

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] "In this day and age it is difficult to think of anything that is not regulated in some way by a state or federal agency. State and federal agencies routinely make decisions that impact our daily lives. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, the clothes we wear, and the places where we live and work are all regulated to some extent.

Agencies sometimes regulate things in ways that lead to strange results. For example, New Hampshire, state regulations allow anyone to own a yak, a bison, a wild boar, or an emu, but ...


New Hampshire’S Claremont Case And The Separation Of Powers, Edward C. Mosca Sep 2006

New Hampshire’S Claremont Case And The Separation Of Powers, Edward C. Mosca

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] "Court decisions involving the adequacy of public education raise some obvious separation of powers problems. These include the institutional competency of courts to determine what level of education is adequate and how much funding is necessary to reach that level, and the authority of courts to enforce such judgments. This article will examine these problems through New Hampshire’s serial education funding litigation, the Claremont case. [. . .]

I will start by briefly reviewing the history of education funding litigation because this context is essential to understanding the Claremont case. I will then undertake a limited review of the Claremont case ...


Inclusionary Zoning In Westchester County, New York: Is It A Viable Tool To Reduce A County-Wide Housing Crisis?, Ann S. Matthews Sep 2006

Inclusionary Zoning In Westchester County, New York: Is It A Viable Tool To Reduce A County-Wide Housing Crisis?, Ann S. Matthews

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


How Qui Tam Actions Could Fight Public Corruption, Aaron R. Petty Jul 2006

How Qui Tam Actions Could Fight Public Corruption, Aaron R. Petty

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Note argues that public corruption at the state and local levels is a serious problem throughout the United States. Because public corruption decreases confidence in the democratic system at all levels of government, a strong response is necessary. Due to difficulties inherent in the deterrence, detection, and prosecution of state and local corruption, innovative methods to respond to this problem are needed. The author argues that amending the federal criminal statutes most commonly used to prosecute state and local public corruption, to allow a private citizen to bring a qui tam civil action against the public official for violations ...


Juvenile Competency Statutes: A Model For State Legislation, Kellie M. Johnson Jul 2006

Juvenile Competency Statutes: A Model For State Legislation, Kellie M. Johnson

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Let History Be Our Guide: Using Historical Analogies To Analyze State Response To A Post-Granholm Era, Matthew B. Mills Jul 2006

Let History Be Our Guide: Using Historical Analogies To Analyze State Response To A Post-Granholm Era, Matthew B. Mills

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Conflicts Between The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court And The Legislature: Campaign Finance Reform And Same-Sex Marriage, Mark C. Miller Jun 2006

Conflicts Between The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court And The Legislature: Campaign Finance Reform And Same-Sex Marriage, Mark C. Miller

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] "This article will examine recent interactions and dialogues between the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts (“SJC” or “Supreme Judicial Court”) and the Massachusetts State Legislature. The interactions between courts and legislatures are often cordial, but sometimes these interactions are also highly conflictual. During the 1980s and 1990s, the relationship between the Massachusetts legislature and the Supreme Court was indeed mainly cooperative. Recently, however, in several high profile cases the Supreme Court has been willing to challenge directly the decisions of the legislature and vice versa. Among other controversies, the Court’s 2002 decision requiring that the state legislature fund ...


The Political Market For Criminal Justice, Rachel E. Barkow Jun 2006

The Political Market For Criminal Justice, Rachel E. Barkow

Michigan Law Review

In 2004, the number of individuals incarcerated in the United States exceeded the two million mark. The current incarceration rate in the United States is 726 per 100,000 residents, the highest incarceration rate in the Western world and a dramatic increase from just three decades ago. Not only are more people serving time, but sentences have markedly lengthened. What should we make of these trends? The answer has been easy for most legal scholars: to them, the incarceration rate in the United States is too high, and reforms are necessary to lower sentences. But many political leaders and voters ...


Crime, Criminals, And Competitive Crime Control, Wayne A. Logan Jun 2006

Crime, Criminals, And Competitive Crime Control, Wayne A. Logan

Michigan Law Review

Given the negative consequences of crime, it should come as no surprise that states will endeavor to make their dominions less hospitable to potential criminal actors. This predisposition, when played out on a national stage, would appear ripe for a dynamic in which states will seek to "out-tough" one another, leading to a spiral of detrimental competitiveness. Doran Teichman, in an article recently appearing in these pages, advances just such a view. Teichman posits that the decentralized structure of America's federalist system provides states with "an incentive to increasingly harshen" their crime control efforts, with the net result being ...


Decentralizing Crime Control: The Political Economy Perspective, Doron Teichman Jun 2006

Decentralizing Crime Control: The Political Economy Perspective, Doron Teichman

Michigan Law Review

In an article recently published on the pages of this Law Review, The Market for Criminal Justice: Federalism, Crime Control, and Jurisdictional Competition ("The Market"), I put forward a theory of crime control in a decentralized government. Specifically, I made three distinct claims. First, criminal justice policies affect the geographic decision of criminals as to where to commit their crimes. Other things being equal, criminal activity will tend to shift to areas in which the expected sanction is lower. Second, local jurisdictions attempting to lower their crime rates will react to policies adopted by neighboring jurisdictions and try to keep ...


Free Will To Will? A Case For The Recognition Of Intestacy Rights For Survivors To A Same-Sex Marriage Or Civil Union?, Christine A. Hammerle Jun 2006

Free Will To Will? A Case For The Recognition Of Intestacy Rights For Survivors To A Same-Sex Marriage Or Civil Union?, Christine A. Hammerle

Michigan Law Review

This Note argues that courts should recognize intestacy rights for same sex couples that were validly married or civilly united in a state other than the one in which one of the partners died. Courts may validly recognize the marriage for intestacy purposes, even while refusing to recognize the marriage as against public policy. Part I details the recent provision of benefits in various states to same-sex couples. Part II argues that same-sex couples cannot necessarily rely on wills to effectuate their intent to leave their property to their spouses. Part III argues that when states refuse to recognize the ...


Megasubsidiaries And Asset Sales Under Section 271: Which Shareholders Must Approve Subsidiary Asset Sales, Yaman Shukairy Jun 2006

Megasubsidiaries And Asset Sales Under Section 271: Which Shareholders Must Approve Subsidiary Asset Sales, Yaman Shukairy

Michigan Law Review

Corporate law statutes determine the nature of the relationship between shareholders, the principal owners of the corporation, and the board of directors, those w ho run and operate the corporation. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law ("DGCL"), many of the powers are delegated to the board of directors. More specifically, under section 141, "the business and affairs of every corporation . . . [are] managed by or under the direction of a board of directors . . . ." The Delaware courts have interpreted this provision by deferring to decisions by directors and their designated management under the business judgment rule, which presumes that in making a ...


Fear And Loathing: Combating Speculation In Local Communities, Ngai Pindell May 2006

Fear And Loathing: Combating Speculation In Local Communities, Ngai Pindell

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Local governments commonly respond to economic and social pressures on property by using their legal power to regulate land uses. These local entities enact regulations that limit property development and use to maintain attractive communities and orderly growth. This Article argues that government entities should employ their expansive land use powers to limit investor speculation in local markets by restricting the resale of residential housing for three years. Investor speculation, and the upward pressure it places on housing prices, threatens the availability of affordable housing as well as the development of stable neighborhoods. Government regulation of investor speculation mirrors existing ...


Contents: Allen Chair Symposium-State Of The Chesapeake Bay In The Twenty-First Century May 2006

Contents: Allen Chair Symposium-State Of The Chesapeake Bay In The Twenty-First Century

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Law Review Index, Volume Xl, 2005-2006 May 2006

Law Review Index, Volume Xl, 2005-2006

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Prospect Of Enacting An Unborn Victims Of Violence Act In North Carolina, Jennifer A. Brobst Apr 2006

The Prospect Of Enacting An Unborn Victims Of Violence Act In North Carolina, Jennifer A. Brobst

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


Georgia Photo Id Requirement: Proof Positive Of The Need To Extend Section 5, David H. Harris Jr. Apr 2006

Georgia Photo Id Requirement: Proof Positive Of The Need To Extend Section 5, David H. Harris Jr.

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


North Carolina's Real Estate Recording Laws: The Ghost Of 1985, Charles Szypszak Apr 2006

North Carolina's Real Estate Recording Laws: The Ghost Of 1985, Charles Szypszak

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


"Inevitable Inequities:" The Public Duty Doctrine And Sovereign Immunity In North Carolina, G. Braxton Price Apr 2006

"Inevitable Inequities:" The Public Duty Doctrine And Sovereign Immunity In North Carolina, G. Braxton Price

Campbell Law Review

This comment first examines the muddled past of the application of the public duty doctrine by the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of North Carolina with the aim of showing that it is unworkable, confusing, and unjust. Second, it suggests the Supreme Court of North Carolina should completely abrogate the public duty doctrine in deference to the legislature's intent to waive sovereign immunity to the extent it has done so in the Tort Claims Act. Finally, in its stead, an alternative approach is offered. The North Carolina Supreme Court should adopt a traditional negligence standard of reasonable ...


A Morass Of Confusion And Inconsistency: The Application Of The Doctrine Of Nullum Tempus Occurrit Regi In North Carolina, Thomas R. Young Apr 2006

A Morass Of Confusion And Inconsistency: The Application Of The Doctrine Of Nullum Tempus Occurrit Regi In North Carolina, Thomas R. Young

Campbell Law Review

Given the courts' and legislature's desire to maintain the doctrine of nullum tempus, the need for guiding principles of application is great. This article seeks to piece together the disparate guiding principles the courts have articulated regarding the nullum tempus doctrine from its initial introduction in North Carolina to the present time. Secondarily, the article will explore the case for modification of the current interpretation of the doctrine so as to provide a more uniform and consistent application to governmental actions. In so doing, an inquiry will be made into the approach other jurisdictions upholding nullum tempus take toward ...


Constitutional Law—Direct Shipment Of Alcohol—Well-Aged And Finally Uncorked: The Supreme Court Decides Whether The Twenty-First Amendment Grants States The Power To Avoid The Dormant Commerce Clause. Granholm V. Heald, 125 S. Ct. 1885 (2005)., Robert L. Jones Iii Apr 2006

Constitutional Law—Direct Shipment Of Alcohol—Well-Aged And Finally Uncorked: The Supreme Court Decides Whether The Twenty-First Amendment Grants States The Power To Avoid The Dormant Commerce Clause. Granholm V. Heald, 125 S. Ct. 1885 (2005)., Robert L. Jones Iii

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Collision Of The Takings And State Sovereign Immunity Doctrines, Eric Berger Mar 2006

The Collision Of The Takings And State Sovereign Immunity Doctrines, Eric Berger

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Stealing The Public Purse: Why Washington's Collective Bargaining Law For State Employees Violates The State Constitution, Christopher D. Abbott Feb 2006

Stealing The Public Purse: Why Washington's Collective Bargaining Law For State Employees Violates The State Constitution, Christopher D. Abbott

Washington Law Review

In 2002, the Washington legislature passed the Personnel System Reform Act (PSRA), which gives state employees the right to collectively bargain over wages and other economic terms of their employment. Section 302(3) of the PSRA further provides that once the Governor and collective bargaining units reach a proposed collective bargaining agreement, the legislature may not amend the agreement. Instead, the legislature may only express disapproval with any portion of the agreement by rejecting funding of the agreement as a whole. This Comment argues that section 302(3) of the PSRA, now codified at RCW 41.80.010(3), violates ...