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2006

Legal Writing and Research

Legal literature

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Plural Of Anecdote Is “Blog”, A. Michael Froomkin Jan 2006

The Plural Of Anecdote Is “Blog”, A. Michael Froomkin

Washington University Law Review

Evaluating the limitations and benefits of blogging as a form of legal scholarship, this paper ultimately asks the question -- what are blogs good for? This paper puts forth the argument that law blogs are a great tool for the sharing, organization, and development of ideas. At the same time, the limitations of blogging when dealing with complex, lengthy material are recognized.


Is Blogging Scholarship? Why Do You Want To Know?, James Lindgren Jan 2006

Is Blogging Scholarship? Why Do You Want To Know?, James Lindgren

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Blogs And The Promotion And Tenure Letter, Ellen S. Podgor Jan 2006

Blogs And The Promotion And Tenure Letter, Ellen S. Podgor

Washington University Law Review

Writing promotion and tenure letters is an important service to the academy, albeit one that is seldom rewarded in comparison to the enormous time consumption involved. And although evaluations to date have all been premised on hard-text material, it is likely that soon the day will come that the packet of scholarship material arriving on one's doorstep will be a Website address that leads to a blog. In thinking about whether law blogs are legal scholarship, an important consideration in answering this question is how a blog should be evaluated for promotion and tenure purposes.


Blog As A Bugged Water Cooler, Kate Litvak Jan 2006

Blog As A Bugged Water Cooler, Kate Litvak

Washington University Law Review

Legal academics like to think that everything they write is scholarly. There is no surer way to offend a colleague than to suggest that some of his public musings are—gasp!—not scholarship. These comments do not seek to debate whether someone’s remarks on the Enron trial, or “gotcha” comments on the quality of the New York Times reporting, or critique of a recent Michelle Malkin book, or teaching notes thinly disguised as encyclopedic entries qualify as “scholarship.” For the purpose of these remarks, “scholarship” is anything that satisfies your budget committee.

A safer (and more productive) inquiry is ...


Scholarship In Action: The Power, Possibilities, And Pitfalls For Law Professor Blogs, Douglas A. Berman Jan 2006

Scholarship In Action: The Power, Possibilities, And Pitfalls For Law Professor Blogs, Douglas A. Berman

Washington University Law Review

A general debate concerning whether law blogs can be legal scholarship makes little more sense than a general debate concerning whether law articles or law books can be legal scholarship. Blogs—like articles and books—are just a medium of communication. Like other media, blogs surely can be used to advance a scholarly mission or a range of other missions.

Looking through the debate over law blogs as legal scholarship, I see a set of bigger and more important (and perhaps scarier) questions about legal scholarship and the activities of law professors. First, the blog-as-scholarship debate raises fundamental questions about ...


Blogging At Blackprof, Paul Butler Jan 2006

Blogging At Blackprof, Paul Butler

Washington University Law Review

Commenting on the papers by Doug Berman Lawrence Solumn, this paper raises questions concerning the emergence of blogging and its relationship with legal scholarship. These insights suggest that blogging can reach a wider audience and introduce a new way of connecting to certain issues in a way that law reviews cannot reproduce.


Blogs And The Legal Academy, Orin S. Kerr Jan 2006

Blogs And The Legal Academy, Orin S. Kerr

Washington University Law Review

This paper's focus is on today’s technology and ask whether blogs as we know them today are conducive to advancing scholarship. This paper's conclusion is that relative to other forms of communication, blogs do not provide a particularly good platform for advancing serious legal scholarship. The blog format focuses reader attention on recent thoughts rather than deep ones. The tyranny of reverse chronological order limits the scholarly usefulness of blogs by leading the reader to the latest instead of the best.

This doesn’t mean that blogs can’t advance scholarship. The impact of any blog depends ...


Scholarship, Blogging, And Tradeoffs: On Discovering, Disseminating, And Doing, Eugene Volokh Jan 2006

Scholarship, Blogging, And Tradeoffs: On Discovering, Disseminating, And Doing, Eugene Volokh

Washington University Law Review

Now, more than ever before, we legal academics have to, at least in some measure, choose. Should we spend the bulk of our time discovering, with the reputational, professional, and emotional benefits that this produces? Or should we spend more of the time disseminating, mostly disseminating views that are our own but are based on others’ discoveries, with the very different reputational, professional, and emotional benefits that this produces?

Sure, it’s our choice, at least once we have tenure. But how should we exercise that choice? Yes, we’re probably better off both discovering and disseminating, if we’re ...


Are Modern Bloggers Following In The Footsteps Of Publius? (And Other Musings On Blogging By Legal Scholars . . .), Gail Heriot Jan 2006

Are Modern Bloggers Following In The Footsteps Of Publius? (And Other Musings On Blogging By Legal Scholars . . .), Gail Heriot

Washington University Law Review

Is legal blogging an antidote to the hyper-scholasticism that sometimes characterizes the legal academy today? Or is it a self-indulgence for legal scholars? It's hard to know. On the one hand, there is a proud American tradition behind the publication of concise but erudite essays aimed at a broad audience concerning the important legal issues of the day, starting with the Federalist Papers. It's hard to believe that neglecting that tradition in favor of a cloistered academic existence in which legal scholars write only for each other could be a good thing. On the other hand, even the ...