Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2003

Jurisprudence

Discipline
Institution
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 46

Full-Text Articles in Law

Too Close To The Rack And The Screw: Constitutional Constraints On Torture In The War On Terror, Seth F. Kreimer Nov 2003

Too Close To The Rack And The Screw: Constitutional Constraints On Torture In The War On Terror, Seth F. Kreimer

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


United States V. Bean: Shoveling After The Elephant?, Pannal A. Sanders Oct 2003

United States V. Bean: Shoveling After The Elephant?, Pannal A. Sanders

ExpressO

Thomas Bean’s felony conviction in Mexico implicated provisions of federal law that preclude certain persons, including specified felons, from owning or trading in firearms and ammunition which have been transported in interstate commerce. 18 USC Sec. 922. Affected persons can seek relief from the federal firearms disability by invoking procedures established in 18 USC Sec. 925(c) under the Dept of Treasury, Director of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (“ATF”). Beginning in 1992, Congress has enacted provisions annually in the ATF’s appropriations laws that ban it from investigating or acting upon Sec. 925(c) applications from individuals. Section 925 ...


Racism As "The Nation's Crucial Sin": Theology And Derrick Bell , George H. Taylor Oct 2003

Racism As "The Nation's Crucial Sin": Theology And Derrick Bell , George H. Taylor

ExpressO

The Article probes a paradox that lies at the heart of the work of critical race scholar Derrick Bell. Bell claims on the one hand that racism is permanent, and yet on the other he argues that the fight against racism is both necessary and meaningful. Although Bell’s thesis of racism’s permanence has been criticized for rendering action for racial justice unavailing, the Article advances an understanding of Bell that supports and defends the integrity of his paradox. The Article draws upon the work of Protestant theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and Niebuhr’s paradox that social action is both ...


Suem - Spitz's Ultimate Equitable Maxim: In Equity, Good Guys Should Win And Bad Guys Should Lose, Roger Young, Stephen Spitz Oct 2003

Suem - Spitz's Ultimate Equitable Maxim: In Equity, Good Guys Should Win And Bad Guys Should Lose, Roger Young, Stephen Spitz

South Carolina Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Symbols Of Governance: Thurman Arnold And Post-Realist Legal Theory, Mark Fenster Oct 2003

The Symbols Of Governance: Thurman Arnold And Post-Realist Legal Theory, Mark Fenster

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article is an effort to provide both the intellectual context of Thurman Arnold's work and, through his work, a better sense of where and how the study of law turned after realism. The article is in five parts. Part I describes Arnold's relationship with legal realism, looking at the earliest part of his academic career when, as a mainstream realist, he performed empirical studies of local and state court systems. Part II is Arnold's proposed field of "Political Dynamics," an interdisciplinary approach to the symbols of law, politics, and economics. Part III considers Arnold's authorial ...


The Self-Incrimination Clause Explained And Its Future Predicted, Ronald J. Allen Sep 2003

The Self-Incrimination Clause Explained And Its Future Predicted, Ronald J. Allen

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Canadian Fundamental Justice And American Due Process: Two Models For A Guarantee Of Basic Adjudicative Fairness, David M. Siegel Sep 2003

Canadian Fundamental Justice And American Due Process: Two Models For A Guarantee Of Basic Adjudicative Fairness, David M. Siegel

ExpressO

This paper traces how the Supreme Courts of Canada and the United States have each used the basic guarantee of adjudicative fairness in their respective constitutions to effect revolutions in their countries’ criminal justice systems, through two different jurisprudential models for this development. It identifies a relationship between two core constitutional structures, the basic guarantee and enumerated rights, and shows how this relationship can affect the degree to which entrenched constitutional rights actually protect individuals. It explains that the different models for the relationship between the basic guarantee and enumerated rights adopted in Canada and the United States, an “expansive ...


Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll Sep 2003

Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll

Working Paper Series

Many participants in the music industry consider unauthorized downloading of music files over the Internet to be “theft” of their “property.” Many Internet users who exchange music files reject that characterization. Prompted by this dispute, this Article explores how those who create and distribute music first came to look upon music as their property and when in Western history the law first supported this view. By analyzing the economic and legal structures governing musicmaking in Western Europe from the classical period in Greece through the Renaissance, the Article shows that the law first granted some exclusive rights in the Middle ...


The "No Property" Problem: Understanding Poverty By Understanding Wealth, Jane Baron Sep 2003

The "No Property" Problem: Understanding Poverty By Understanding Wealth, Jane Baron

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Perils Of "Consensus": Hans Kelsen And The Legal Philosophy Of The United Nations, J. Peter Pham Aug 2003

The Perils Of "Consensus": Hans Kelsen And The Legal Philosophy Of The United Nations, J. Peter Pham

ExpressO

Recently the United States and a number of its traditional allies have clashed over a variety of foreign policy issues that are profoundly juridical: the authority for war and peace, the International Criminal Court, etc. The source of these recent tensions is to be located at a level deeper than that of narrow national interests and specific policies. Rather, they arise from significant differences concerning the nature of "consensus" and, ultimately, legal philosophy. While the United Nations and many other international organizations derive their legal visions from the philosophy of law of Hans Kelsen (1881-1973), one of the most important ...


The Trajectory Of (Corporate Law) Scholarship, Brian R. Cheffins Aug 2003

The Trajectory Of (Corporate Law) Scholarship, Brian R. Cheffins

ExpressO

While considerable attention is devoted to legal scholarship, little has been written on the process by which academic writing on law evolves. This paper departs from the existing pattern and examines five potential trajectories for legal scholarship. One is based on the idea that knowledge “accumulates” as part of “progress” towards a better understanding of the matters under study. The second is the concept of the “paradigm”, derived from work done on the history and sociology of science. The third focuses on the idea that academic endeavor concerning law yields useful ideas since market forces are at work. The fourth ...


Race[,] Science, History, And Law, David Caudill Jul 2003

Race[,] Science, History, And Law, David Caudill

David S Caudill

No abstract provided.


Law-And-Literature, Literature-And-Science, And Enhancing The Discourse Of Law/Science Relations, David Caudill Jul 2003

Law-And-Literature, Literature-And-Science, And Enhancing The Discourse Of Law/Science Relations, David Caudill

David S Caudill

No abstract provided.


Marshall V Madison: The Supreme Court And Original Intent, 1803-1835, Gordon Lloyd Jul 2003

Marshall V Madison: The Supreme Court And Original Intent, 1803-1835, Gordon Lloyd

School of Public Policy Working Papers

Should the justices of the Supreme Court rely on “original intent” as the foundation for constitutional interpretation? Or should they be free to interpret the Constitution in light of hermeneutical approaches created by current philosophies of law? This essay examines the Marshall Court to determine whether its opinions take their bearings from the American Founding or instead rely on a philosophy of jurisprudence that can be separated from the Founding. The purposes of this essay are fourfold: 1) to provide a comprehensive account of the use of the Framers by the Marshall Court, 2) address the normative question of the ...


The Constitutional Structure And The Jurisprudence Of Justice Scalia, Bradford R. Clark May 2003

The Constitutional Structure And The Jurisprudence Of Justice Scalia, Bradford R. Clark

Saint Louis University Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Unique Jurisprudence Of Letters Of Credit: Its Origin And Sources, Gao Xiang, Ross P. Buckley May 2003

The Unique Jurisprudence Of Letters Of Credit: Its Origin And Sources, Gao Xiang, Ross P. Buckley

San Diego International Law Journal

This Article seeks to illumine the legal nature of the letter of credit instrument, and catalogue the various sources of law and rules that can govern it; and, by doing so, render a service to those who must quickly come to grips with letter of credit law. The Article is in two parts. The first part examines the legal nature of the letter of credit by looking at its definition, operation, and history and by comparing it with negotiable instruments and contracts. The second part considers the rules, customs, and regulations governing letters of credit and introduces the two fundamental ...


The Economic Ambiguity (And Possible Irrelevance) Of Tax Transition Rules, Eric D. Chason Apr 2003

The Economic Ambiguity (And Possible Irrelevance) Of Tax Transition Rules, Eric D. Chason

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Pragmatist And Non-Pragmatist Knowledge Practices In American Law, Mariana Valverde Mar 2003

Pragmatist And Non-Pragmatist Knowledge Practices In American Law, Mariana Valverde

Pragmatism, Law and Governmentality

For anyone interested in documenting and analyzing knowledge practices, legal arenas prove to be fruitful sites, for at least two reasons. 1) First, questions of evidence and of authority are often explicitly contested, with the contestations often forming part of a court’s public record and/or going on in the public setting of the courtroom. Thus, unlike science studies scholars, who must gain access to social interactions that are not mentioned in scientific papers and that do not take place in public view, legal studies scholars have vast amounts of material – affidavits, trial transcripts, etc– that can readily be ...


Styles Of Pragmatism, Social Science And The Law, Robert P. Burns Mar 2003

Styles Of Pragmatism, Social Science And The Law, Robert P. Burns

Pragmatism, Law and Governmentality

I have long held as an ideal the words of one of foremost American interpreters of John Dewey's philosophy: "An adequate, comprehensive political and social theory must be at once empirical, interpretive, and critical." How these styles of social inquiry, whose practitioners often seem at war, might cohere has never been completely clear. This essay is an attempt to work out in a very limited context some of the issues surrounding these relationships. In particular, I want to explore the relationship between the interpretive style, which I take to be central, and the other two. The focus of these ...


A Consumer-Use Approach To Products Liability, Alan Calnan Jan 2003

A Consumer-Use Approach To Products Liability, Alan Calnan

Alan Calnan

In dicta, courts have had no trouble identifying unreasonable product uses. Indeed, over the years, they have compiled an extensive list of examples. That list includes the following pearls of wisdom. An automobile should not be used as a bulldozer. A shovel should not be used as a doorstop. A hunting and fishing knife should not be used to shave. A knife should not be used as a toothpick. An electric drill should not be used to clean teeth. A power saw should not be used to clip fingernails. A motorized hedge clipper should not be used to trim beards ...


The State’S Perpetual Protection Of Adultery: Examining Koestler V. Pollard And Wisconsin’S Faded Adultery Torts, Nehal A. Patel Jan 2003

The State’S Perpetual Protection Of Adultery: Examining Koestler V. Pollard And Wisconsin’S Faded Adultery Torts, Nehal A. Patel

Nehal A. Patel

No abstract provided.


The Unruliness Of Rules, Peter A. Alces Jan 2003

The Unruliness Of Rules, Peter A. Alces

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr. Jan 2003

Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr.

Faculty Scholarship Series

Brown v. Board of Education occupies a vaunted space in American
jurisprudence. One commentator writes that Brown is the most
celebrated case in the Court's history. Equally laudatory, another
commentator remarks: "In the half century since the Supreme Court's
decision, Brown has become a beloved legal and political icon." A
third proclaims that, "Brown forever changed the role of the United States Supreme Court in American politics and society." To the lay
public, Brown sits among a small pantheon of cases that is widely recognizable
to the average American.' Miranda and Roe v. Wade
likely are the only ...


Drug Testing Those Crazy Chess Club Kids: The Supreme Court Turns Away From The One Clear Path In The Maze Of “Special Needs” Jurisprudence In Board Of Education V. Earls, Marcus Raymond Jan 2003

Drug Testing Those Crazy Chess Club Kids: The Supreme Court Turns Away From The One Clear Path In The Maze Of “Special Needs” Jurisprudence In Board Of Education V. Earls, Marcus Raymond

Saint Louis University Public Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Right To A Jury Decision On Questions Of Fact Under The Seventh Amendment, Paul F. Kirgis Jan 2003

The Right To A Jury Decision On Questions Of Fact Under The Seventh Amendment, Paul F. Kirgis

Faculty Law Review Articles

In a series of decisions over the last decade, the Supreme Court has reconsidered an aspect of the Seventh Amendment that has been long overlooked: the allocation of particular questions to the judge or the jury in a case where the right to a jury trial applies. Breaking with historical practice, the Court has emphasized considerations other than the fact-law distinction as a basis for identifying the questions that must go to the jury. Most prominently, in Markman v. Westview Instruments, Inc., the Court focused on 'functional considerations" in assigning a question of patent claim construction to the judge. In ...


Hercules, Omniscience, Omnipotence, And The Right Answer Thesis, Michael B. W. Sinclair Jan 2003

Hercules, Omniscience, Omnipotence, And The Right Answer Thesis, Michael B. W. Sinclair

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


On Canonical Transformations And The Coherence Of Dichotomies: Jazz, Jurisprudence, And The University Mission, Barbara K. Bucholtz Jan 2003

On Canonical Transformations And The Coherence Of Dichotomies: Jazz, Jurisprudence, And The University Mission, Barbara K. Bucholtz

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


What Do We Mean By "Judicial Independence"?, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 2003

What Do We Mean By "Judicial Independence"?, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In this article, the author argues that the concept of "judicial independence" has served more as an object of rhetoric than it has of sustained study. He views the scholarly literatures that treat it as ships passing in the night, each subject to weaknesses that reflect the needs and fashions of the discipline, but all tending to ignore courts other than the Supreme Court of the United States. Seeking both greater rigor and greater flexibility than one usually finds in public policy debates about, and in the legal and political science literatures on, judicial independence, the author attributes much of ...


Hate Speech In Constitutional Jurisprudence: A Comparative Analysis, Michel Rosenfeld Jan 2003

Hate Speech In Constitutional Jurisprudence: A Comparative Analysis, Michel Rosenfeld

Articles

The United States protects much hate speech that is banned in other Western constitutional democracies and under international human rights covenants and conventions. In the United States, only hate speech that leads to "incitement to violence" can be constitutionally restricted, while under the alternative approach found elsewhere, bans properly extend to hate speech leading to "incitement to hatred." The article undertakes a comparative analysis in light of changes brought by new technologies, such as the internet, which allow for worldwide spread of protected hate speech originating in the United States. After evaluating the respective doctrines, arguments and values involved, the ...


Hegel’S Theory Of Measure, David Gray Carlson Jan 2003

Hegel’S Theory Of Measure, David Gray Carlson

Articles

The final segment in Hegel's analysis of "being" is measure - the unity of quality and quantity. At stake in these chapters is the difference between quantitative and qualitative change. A being or thing is indifferent to quantitative change, which comes from the outside. For instance, a legislature can increase the stringency of zoning regulations, and yet the legislation is still constitutional "zoning." But there comes a point at which quantitative change effects a qualitative change - zoning becomes an uncompensated "taking" of property. This paper analyzes how Hegel, in the "Science of Logic," derives measure from the categories of quality ...